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Barnyrubble

Visa 804 aged parent visa

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31 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Once you have the 804 or 864, you are entitled to the same Medicare as any other Australian.

While you are on the bridging visa for either visa, you are covered by the reciprocal agreement between the UK and Australia, which covers all essential treatment.

Note, however, my post above yours, which explains how the Australian system works.   Even Australians have to pay something towards their medical treatment a lot of the time, and prescriptions can be expensive.

If you put the property in your son's name, you are gifting him the money and he will own the property.  Therefore you need to consider how secure you would feel, knowing he has the right to sell the property at any time and you could do nothing about it. 

According to the visa office yes but medicare site says 804 holders are not entitled.  Why is it all so conflicting.?

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6 minutes ago, Barnyrubble said:

According to the visa office yes but medicare site says 804 holders are not entitled.  Why is it all so conflicting.?

Where does it say on the Medicare site that 804 holders are not entitled? Can you provide a link?

According to this:

 https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/individuals/subjects/how-enrol-and-get-started-medicare/enrolling-medicare/how-enrol-medicare-if-youre-australian-permanent-resident 

It says exactly what Marisa states above - 804 applicants cannot get Medicare (but they might get it under the reciprocal agreement). 

Once you are an 804 holder you are a permanent resident and all permanent residents qualify for Medicare.

It's not conflicting. You just have to read it properly.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I understand the reciprocal but under "if you have applied for a Parents visa" following your link it reads "you can't enrol if youve applied for an 804 or 103 parent visa",   you can enrol if you have a permanent subclass 143 or 864". 

Edited by Barnyrubble
Typographical

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3 minutes ago, Barnyrubble said:

I understand the reciprocal but under "if you have applied for a Parents visa" following your link it reads "you can't enrol if youve applied for an 804 or 103 parent visa",   you can enrol if you have a permanent subclass 143 or 864". 

Yes. That's what Marisa said. You can't enrol if you've merely applied for an 804 vsa.  However, once you have received your 804 visa you are a permanent resident and automatically qualify.

You stated in your earlier post that  "medicare site says 804 holders are not entitled". That is not true. 804 holders are entitled. It's 804 applicants that aren't. They are not the same thing.

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35 minutes ago, Barnyrubble said:

According to the visa office yes but medicare site says 804 holders are not entitled.  Why is it all so conflicting.?

The other thing to consider following on from what Marisa said about the house being in your sons name. It can all go wrong. If your son is married/gets married and that relationship ends then the house he owns will form part of the finances when working out settlement/distribution of assets. If he fell on hard times whether through work or a disability, him getting any financial help from the state may be difficult as he’d be seen as having a second property. If he wanted to buy himself/move up the housing market, the upkeep on his second home may be taken into consideration on the affordability checks. He could say you cover all expenses, bills etc but he’d still have to pay if you stopped paying.  Is he your only child?  If not how will inheritance work if one child owns your house. Its easy to say my kids would just sort it all out fairly but that’s not possible if his ex wife has rights on it. It’s quite a minefield and certainly not something to do lightly. 

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56 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

........ the house being in your sons name. It can all go wrong. If your son is married/gets married and that relationship ends then the house he owns will form part of the finances when working out settlement/distribution of assets.

Even if not married - if in a defacto relationship...or a relationship a court considers to be defacto - your son's financial position in the event of a separation could be seriously impacted by having your house in his name.  I agree with the comments above - it is a potential minefield.

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2 hours ago, Barnyrubble said:

According to the visa office yes but medicare site says 804 holders are not entitled.  Why is it all so conflicting.?

I am confused, in your post 5 hours ago you said that you have been issued with a Medicare card as you had previously lived in Australia. Was that a full one or a temporary one? 

As I wrote on another post from you on another thread, you are sounding very confused, asking the same questions on different threads, so perhaps take a bit of quiet time, read all the replies and consolidate  everything onto one thread. 

All of us who have applied for the various different parent visas understand it’s confusing, and will try to help, but we are only ordinary members not experts.

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9 hours ago, ramot said:

I am confused, in your post 5 hours ago you said that you have been issued with a Medicare card as you had previously lived in Australia. Was that a full one or a temporary one? 

As I wrote on another post from you on another thread, you are sounding very confused, asking the same questions on different threads, so perhaps take a bit of quiet time, read all the replies and consolidate  everything onto one thread. 

All of us who have applied for the various different parent visas understand it’s confusing, and will try to help, but we are only ordinary members not experts.

We have full medicare cards but they should not have been issued as we do not live here. We told them but they were not interested.

So an earlier comment said 804 holders qualify but 804 applicants (on bridging whole waiting 30 years for grant?) aren't???

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11 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

The other thing to consider following on from what Marisa said about the house being in your sons name. It can all go wrong. If your son is married/gets married and that relationship ends then the house he owns will form part of the finances when working out settlement/distribution of assets. If he fell on hard times whether through work or a disability, him getting any financial help from the state may be difficult as he’d be seen as having a second property. If he wanted to buy himself/move up the housing market, the upkeep on his second home may be taken into consideration on the affordability checks. He could say you cover all expenses, bills etc but he’d still have to pay if you stopped paying.  Is he your only child?  If not how will inheritance work if one child owns your house. Its easy to say my kids would just sort it all out fairly but that’s not possible if his ex wife has rights on it. It’s quite a minefield and certainly not something to do lightly. 

Helpful.thank you   he is married with his own business and it would be too much of a worry. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Barnyrubble said:

We have full medicare cards but they should not have been issued as we do not live here. We told them but they were not interested.

So an earlier comment said 804 holders qualify but 804 applicants (on bridging whole waiting 30 years for grant?) aren't???

@Barnyrubble, why would you think otherwise?  You are effectively  jumping the queue by exploiting a loophole in the law. If you choose to do that, you have to accept the consequences.

The normal way to apply for any visa is to apply from your home country, wait there until you have been vetted and approved, and then migrate.  But a loophole means that if you arrive in Australia and apply for a visa onshore,  you're allowed to stay on a bridging visa, even though you've gone through none of the vetting procedures normally required to get a long-term visa. 

I know you're thinking, "but if I go home and wait, I'll be waiting 30 years".   Well actually, the government doesn't want anyone to apply for the 804 visa.  Parents on 804 visas are costing the Australian taxpayer a fortune in medical bills, aged care and pensions, so the government tried to abolish it a few years ago - but it had to go through parliament and was defeated.  So they have made the waiting time unreasonably long to deter applicants.  However they neglected to close the loophole.

Frankly, you should count yourself lucky that such a loophole exists, because it doesn't exist in most other countries.  

 

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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11 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

@Barnyrubble, why would you think otherwise?  You are effectively  jumping the queue by exploiting a loophole in the law. If you choose to do that, you have to accept the consequences.

The normal way to apply for any visa is to apply from your home country, wait there until you have been vetted and approved, and then migrate.  But a loophole means that if you arrive in Australia and apply for a visa onshore,  you're allowed to stay on a bridging visa, even though you've gone through none of the vetting procedures normally required to get a long-term visa. 

Frankly, you should count yourself lucky that such a loophole exists, because it doesn't exist in most other countries.  

 

The other thing to bear in mind too - as evidenced by not infrequent sob stories in the papers - what will happen if, come the time, you are rejected on medical grounds. Far easier to go home and apply then arrive with a no worries visa.  

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10 hours ago, Barnyrubble said:

We have full medicare cards but they should not have been issued as we do not live here. We told them but they were not interested.

So an earlier comment said 804 holders qualify but 804 applicants (on bridging whole waiting 30 years for grant?) aren't???

This is all semantics.

804 holders get medicare as residents.

804 applicants are not not eligible.

British citizens (as I understand) on a bridging visa are eligible for reciprocal Medicare.

My in-laws on visitor visa get new Medicare cards each time they come over.

Hope that makes sense 😁

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