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The Pom Queen

Australia suspends Skilled Migration Until further notice

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COVID-19 pandemic to have a significant influence on the shape of Australia’s Migration Program'

However this year, the Department of Home Affairs has advised the states and territories to put their programs on hold until further notice.

In a statement to SBS Punjabi, a spokesperson for the Department said that migration continues to make substantial contributions to Australia’s economic prosperity, national well-being and social cohesion.

“The government is closely monitoring migration and visa settings to ensure they are consistent with public health measures, are flexible and do not displace job opportunities for Australians so that Australia can deal with the immediate and post-recovery impacts of COVID-19,” said the spokesperson.

The Department further stated that the ongoing impacts of the pandemic worldwide, both medically, socially and economically, will have a "significant influence on the shape of Australia’s Migration Program going forward."

Below is the information for each state

 

Victoria:

State nomination program remains temporarily closed. But applicants can still lodge an EOI through the Department of Home Affairs SkillSelect system.

“The 2020-21 Victorian state nomination program will open at a date to be advised after further advice from the Commonwealth Government," according to the information available on the state migration website.

New South Wales:

NSW is currently closed to applications for nomination under the Business Innovation and Investment Program (BIIP) and the Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 491).

The state will open to new nominations once they receive their quota for the current financial year.  

“Invitation rounds for NSW nomination under the Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) will also commence at this time. At this stage, we are unable to advise when this will occur," the state government has declared on its website.

South Australia: 

The state’s business and skilled migration programs are scheduled to re-open from early August.

This will be dependent on the Commonwealth Government’s allocation of state nomination places for the program year 2020-21," as per the state website.

Queensland:

Business and Skilled Migration Queensland (BSMQ) has also announced that its state nomination program will remain closed until further notice. The state has declared that it will not be accepting any EOIs.

The state is now awaiting advice from the Department of Home Affairs with regards to its nomination allocation for the financial year 2020-21.

“BSMQ has not yet received advice from Home Affairs in regard to Queensland’s nomination allocation for FY20-21 and when we will be able to re-open the business and skilled program," BSMQ announced on its website.

 

Tasmania:

Applications remain open and will continue to be considered, but no nominations can be made until the state receives its allocation for the program year.

“Migration Tasmania currently does not have an indication of the size of the 2020 -2021 nomination quota and cannot guarantee all eligible applicants will be nominated," wrote Tasmania Migration.

Northern Territory:

NT Government has also declared that it is currently unable to issue nominations under the skilled and business migration programs.

“At this stage, if you are currently living in the NT, you will still be able to lodge new applications for NT nomination under the GSM program, and these applications will continue to be assessed. Offshore GSM nomination applications remain closed. BIIP nomination applications remain open," as per the Territory website.

No update is available for Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory.

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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Thanks for sharing the update... *sigh*


6-Aug-13 457 Visa lodged : 16-Aug-13 Visa Granted 06-Sept-13 Landed in Sydney : 28-Jun-15 Pinged back to the UK (Family Obligations) : 06-Jun-2019 Decided it was time to Pong back to AU : Jan-2020 COVID! Everything Stops

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Posted (edited)

Just to note that this update refers only to NEW applications.

Essentially, the Federal Government hasn't confirmed the skilled list changes for this financial year, and neither they nor the States can open for new applications until they do.

 

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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37 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Just to note that this update refers only to NEW applications.

Essentially, the Federal Government hasn't confirmed the skilled list changes for this financial year, and neither they nor the States can open for new applications until they do.

 

There are a lot who are on temp visas who may be affected. 

 


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

There are a lot who are on temp visas who may be affected. 

As I understand it, this update is specifically about new applications.  There are other reports besides the SBS one, which make that clearer. 

People on existing temp visas are currently affected by the existing travel bans, that's a different thing AFAIK

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)

I don't see how people can be upset with this (unless you are wanting to apply but haven't done so yet). Countries around the world should be prioritising the residents they currently have for job prospects before taking in any new immigrants. How can that be argued by anyone during these times?

Edited by Canada2Australia
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19 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

As I understand it, this update is specifically about new applications.  There are other reports besides the SBS one, which make that clearer. 

People on existing temp visas are currently affected by the existing travel bans, that's a different thing AFAIK

What about people on temp visas that are coming up to their "there may be pathway to PR after 3 years" point. Are they barred from putting in an application to convert away from the temp visa also until this is resolved (would this also affect 489 holders who now wish to exercise their right to switch from provisional to permanent residency)?

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4 hours ago, Marisawright said:

As I understand it, this update is specifically about new applications.  There are other reports besides the SBS one, which make that clearer. 

People on existing temp visas are currently affected by the existing travel bans, that's a different thing AFAIK

Going from a temp visa to a PR would be considered a new application wouldn’t it?


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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The SBS article states.
Mr Glazbrook said visa holders whose visas are due to expire in months leading to October will be “significantly disadvantaged” due to delay in allocation of state nomination places. “There are certainly a number of applicants who will be impacted where they might have a visa that expires in the next few months and was going to apply for a skilled migration visa or was going to apply to be sponsored by a state or territory, those programs are temporarily on hold then that could result in those people who ordinarily would have been eligible to apply for a skilled visa, that’s no longer available to those people,” he said. Onshore student visa holders looking to apply for skilled visas, applicants who have lodged EOIs and have not been invited and some offshore visa holders awaiting permanent residency may also be affected.


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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7 hours ago, The Pom Queen said:

The SBS article states.
Mr Glazbrook said visa holders whose visas are due to expire in months leading to October will be “significantly disadvantaged” due to delay in allocation of state nomination places. “There are certainly a number of applicants who will be impacted where they might have a visa that expires in the next few months and was going to apply for a skilled migration visa or was going to apply to be sponsored by a state or territory, those programs are temporarily on hold then that could result in those people who ordinarily would have been eligible to apply for a skilled visa, that’s no longer available to those people,” he said. Onshore student visa holders looking to apply for skilled visas, applicants who have lodged EOIs and have not been invited and some offshore visa holders awaiting permanent residency may also be affected.

Fair point. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 03/07/2020 at 08:01, Canada2Australia said:

I don't see how people can be upset with this (unless you are wanting to apply but haven't done so yet). Countries around the world should be prioritising the residents they currently have for job prospects before taking in any new immigrants. How can that be argued by anyone during these times?

There are a lot of people on WHV and other temp visas who are currently in Australia and being looked after, as opposed to PR applicants who have worked hard at satisfying visa conditions over the past X amount of years and are on the MSTSOL. They certainly should and are taking care of citizens first, but prioritizing backpackers over industry professionals is a little annoying. I sold my accumulated wealth here in Canada and have been invited and applied for my 190 visa, I'm pissed as are many other people who are currently in a similar situation.

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41 minutes ago, Domo said:

There are a lot of people on WHV and other temp visas who are currently in Australia and being looked after, as opposed to PR applicants who have worked hard at satisfying visa conditions over the past X amount of years and are on the MSTSOL. They certainly should and are taking care of citizens first, but prioritizing backpackers over industry professionals is a little annoying. I sold my accumulated wealth here in Canada and have been invited and applied for my 190 visa, I'm pissed as are many other people who are currently in a similar situation.

When did you sell your wealth? Before you were actually invited? If so, I'd say that was a bit premature considering there could have been a plethora of reasons that you may have been rejected, let alone a global pandemic. This is a situation where you will simply have to tough it out and hope for the best. Immigration is never a guarantee and people shouldn't gamble their lives and money away unless they are certain they will be migrating.

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16 hours ago, Domo said:

There are a lot of people on WHV and other temp visas who are currently in Australia and being looked after, as opposed to PR applicants who have worked hard at satisfying visa conditions over the past X amount of years and are on the MSTSOL. They certainly should and are taking care of citizens first, but prioritizing backpackers over industry professionals is a little annoying. I sold my accumulated wealth here in Canada and have been invited and applied for my 190 visa, I'm pissed as are many other people who are currently in a similar situation.

Australia looks after Australians, they talk a good talk about fairness but they make the rules they want and suit them

Remember the rules are made by politicians who have to get elected every 3 years.

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I don't see how people can be upset with this (unless you are wanting to apply but haven't done so yet). Countries around the world should be prioritising the residents they currently have for job prospects before taking in any new immigrants. How can that be argued by anyone during these times?


You clearly don’t understand the purpose of a skilled visa program

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37 minutes ago, Mcguinnessp1968 said:

 


You clearly don’t understand the purpose of a skilled visa program

 

I'm not sure I understand that comment.   


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I'm not sure I understand that comment.   

It’s pretty straightforward

Skilled migration programs exist to allow employers to fill roles they otherwise can’t fill with Australians

So to say that jobs should go to Australians before migrants is nonsense because in many cases there are none available who can do the jobs

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Just now, Mcguinnessp1968 said:


It’s pretty straightforward

Skilled migration programs exist to allow employers to fill roles they otherwise can’t fill with Australians

So to say that jobs should go to Australians before migrants is nonsense because in many cases there are none available who can do the jobs

I don't think that's what he's saying. 

Let's take the hospitality industry as an example.  While we had a shortage of chefs before the pandemic, we're likely to have a glut of them after, because it's believed many restaurants won't survive.  Hairdressers were on the list, ditto.   Lots of other examples.  That's why a review is necesssary.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I don't think that's what he's saying. 
Let's take the hospitality industry as an example.  While we had a shortage of chefs before the pandemic, we're likely to have a glut of them after, because it's believed many restaurants won't survive.  Hairdressers were on the list, ditto.   Lots of other examples.  That's why a review is necesssary.



Fair point

I can only look my my own industry, telecommunications

The skills didn’t exist pre pandemic, so they won’t exist post pandemic

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41 minutes ago, Mcguinnessp1968 said:

I can only look my my own industry, telecommunications

The skills didn’t exist pre pandemic, so they won’t exist post pandemic

 

 

Yes, there are several occupations like that, where the need won't change.  But they don't know that till they do the review, I guess


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 hours ago, Mcguinnessp1968 said:

 

 


Fair point

I can only look my my own industry, telecommunications

The skills didn’t exist pre pandemic, so they won’t exist post pandemic

 

 

Yes, supply may be unchanged ... but the question is also “will the demand exist?”

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. Any comments relate to legislation and policy at date of post. 

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We have never been so busy

Of course demand will tail off slightly as some businesses go under but in the telecommunications business it will continue as it has

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Hope this will answer some questions

migrationprogram2021-2.pdf

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Citizenship Applied - 21/05/20, Application - Received , Council - Randwick

VetAssess Applied - 10/06/18, Positive Skill Assessment -  15/10/18 EOI NSW  190 - 23/10/18, Invitation -  15/11/18, Nomination Applied - 19/11/18,   Nomination Approved- 20/11/18, Visa Lodged - 27/11/18, Health exam - 19/12/18, Grant - 21/05/19

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1 hour ago, Mcguinnessp1968 said:

We have never been so busy

Of course demand will tail off slightly as some businesses go under but in the telecommunications business it will continue as it has

Again, that may be true in your particular industry, but in other industries, there's likely to be a drop in demand.  So another reason why they need some time to do a review.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Again, that may be true in your particular industry, but in other industries, there's likely to be a drop in demand.  So another reason why they need some time to do a review.


I get it honestly I do

The point I was trying to make is to say that jobs should go to Aussies first before migrants is a very simplistic one and not always valid

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Mcguinnessp1968 said:

 


You clearly don’t understand the purpose of a skilled visa program

 

Yes, I am well educated on it's purpose, thanks. You simply misunderstood the context of my comment.

Edited by Canada2Australia

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