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Hi, 

I'm currently a commissioning engineer for a large gas turbine OEM (supplying mainly oil & gas and energy sectors) and looking to find out more about the industry in Australia, in particular the best areas for my type of work, and what sort of salary I could expect? I have already realised employer sponsorship would be nigh-on impossible.

Perth seems an obvious choice for the oil & gas jobs, and my own company have offices in both Melbourne and Sydney (so could be a possibility of employer sponsorship if I'm still working for them at the time) - add in the fact we are childless (and intend on being) and very social then we are very much looking for that "city life". 

I've had a quick look at visas and would both be looking at skilled visas (missus is in mental health nursing) as both our occupations are on the SOL (I believe I would be eligible for state sponsorship too) - I have 21 years experience in engineering in various roles, and I have a bachelor degree which I have confirmed is accredited. Only thing against me is my age (will be 40-44 when we intend on moving). I guess I could take one of the English proficiency tests if i needed the extra 10 points?

Skill-wise, my degree is in Mechanical Engineering, as is my apprenticeship, but currently working in controls (PLCs) and electrical (instrumentation) with limited exposure to valves, compressors etc.

Anyway, look forward to hearing the thoughts of any fellow professional engineers 🙂 

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Only one of you needs to apply for a visa, and then includes their partner in the application. 

I think your first step is to make sure you could get a visa, given your ages.   You lose points for age, and the points score is critical.  Although you only need 65 points to apply, it's a highly competitive process and no one with less than 90 points has been successful in recent times (in any occupation).  Most people do take the English test for extra points, but don't assume you'll get 10 points.  For some reason, non-native speakers tend to score better than native speakers!  

Employer sponsorship is probably not a good idea.  Most sponsorships are just for a temporary contract of 2 to 4 years, with a possibility (not a guarantee) of a permanent visa at the end- and by that time you'd be over 45 and not eligible.

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thanks for the quick reply. Have been getting between 65-75 points depending on my interpretation of a couple of things. Having looked at some of the tests I'd definitely fancy my chances at the extra points if needed. As you say though, getting even above the minimum points stlll wont guarantee acceptance as things change all the time! To some extent visa-wise "what will be will be" - I can't really change any of the variables involved.

Was hoping to get more of an insight to my specific industry to be honest.

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Assuming I got in on a permanent visa, then I also assume i'd be able to take a permanent work contract?

 

EG if my existing employer offer me a move to their Oz offices in a similar role, based on the assumption I quality for a permanent visa, then there's no reason I couldnt be offered a permanent work contract no?

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1 hour ago, The DJing Engineer said:

Assuming I got in on a permanent visa, then I also assume i'd be able to take a permanent work contract?

 

EG if my existing employer offer me a move to their Oz offices in a similar role, based on the assumption I quality for a permanent visa, then there's no reason I couldnt be offered a permanent work contract no?

If you could move with your current employer that would be your best bet. Once you're here and in a job you can have a good look round with confidence.

Perth has a large oil, gas and mining industries, a lot of the major players offices are in Perth. If you can get a job with one of the major players it's likely to be well paid. Could be fly in fly out though. If you're childless though it's a good chance to get some savings.

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2 hours ago, The DJing Engineer said:

Thanks for the quick reply. Have been getting between 65-75 points depending on my interpretation of a couple of things. Having looked at some of the tests I'd definitely fancy my chances at the extra points if needed. 

Was hoping to get more of an insight to my specific industry to be honest.

If you reckon you've got 75 points + 10 points for English, that's only 85 points.  At that level, you've got absolutely zero chance of getting a 189 visa.   Here are the figures:

https://www.iscah.com/will-get-189-invitation-january-2020-estimates/

And note, that was before Covid.   The expectation is that it will get even tougher now.

Like I said, no point in researching the industry if there's no way to get a visa.

 

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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To amplify my post - I think there's a general perception that if you are highly qualified and at the top of your profession, of course there will be a way to migrate to Australia.  Unfortunately it doesn't work like that. Perhaps it should, but it doesn't.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Would the same higher real-life points requirement apply for a 482 temporary skills visa, or 489 skilled regional (provisional)? 

If that was an easier route in, then explore the permanent options once we're settled? Apparently another option is for my partner to apply and as long as we're married then I'd get in with her...

 

Also, what's the harm in asking about the job market before being granted a visa? Why would i go to the effort and cost of getting a visa only to find out the job market I'm interested in is on its arse? Surely it's better to gain as much information about the country as possible, before dropping thousands on visa fees?

Edited by The DJing Engineer
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The points don't matter for a 482 visa as the sponsorship element from the company effectively removes that need. However if you leave that company (your choice or theirs) you only have 30 days to find someone else to take over the sponsorship or you go home. You would then need to be able to get points together to get a skilled visa in order to stay.

The 491 (replacement for 489 which is no longer available) has much lower points entitlement as its designed to allow the states to get people in to fill jobs that need doing. The issue you will have is that your industry is rarely located in the "back of beyond" and is usually HQ'd slap bang in the centre of a major city (you might be working on projects in the middle of nowhere but you'll be employed in the city) and so you can't get that sort of work on a REGIONAL visa 491

It might be worth exploring a 190 - but before they closed immigration scheme unilaterally, WA(Perth) was not offering 190 for your occupation but NSW(Sydney) did but thats about as far away from your chosen location of Perth as you can get and still be in Australia

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9 minutes ago, Ausvisitor said:

The points don't matter for a 482 visa as the sponsorship element from the company effectively removes that need. However if you leave that company (your choice or theirs) you only have 30 days to find someone else to take over the sponsorship or you go home. You would then need to be able to get points together to get a skilled visa in order to stay.

The 491 (replacement for 489 which is no longer available) has much lower points entitlement as its designed to allow the states to get people in to fill jobs that need doing. The issue you will have is that your industry is rarely located in the "back of beyond" and is usually HQ'd slap bang in the centre of a major city (you might be working on projects in the middle of nowhere but you'll be employed in the city) and so you can't get that sort of work on a REGIONAL visa 491

It might be worth exploring a 190 - but before they closed immigration scheme unilaterally, WA(Perth) was not offering 190 for your occupation but NSW(Sydney) did but thats about as far away from your chosen location of Perth as you can get and still be in Australia

 

thanks for the reply.

 

you;re right about the HQs. My company have offices in the centre of the business districts in Sydney and Melbourne. However, my job is "home-based". I sit at home waiting for my next job away, so proximity to the office would not be an issue if I continue with the same role.

My partner would need to be working in a hospital or other such facility, which I guess are more "spread around". A few years in the sticks before a city move might not be such a bad thing 🙂

I'm going to seek some professional advice regarding the visas now anyway (since it could be either myself or my partner who has the best chance, I also have a first cousin living in Sydney since 2010 that I only just remembered! so that may change things too)

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1 hour ago, The DJing Engineer said:

Also, what's the harm in asking about the job market before being granted a visa? Why would i go to the effort and cost of getting a visa only to find out the job market I'm interested in is on its arse? 

I wasn't suggesting you should.  Any reputable migration agent will give you a free consultation to give you an idea of your chances.   If your chances are slim to none, they'll tell you that, and you'll save yourself a lot of research.    If they say you could possibly apply for a particular visa (e.g. in a particular state or in regional areas) then you'll know where you need to direct your research. 

If your partner is younger and has an occupation on the skilled list, with the required qualifications and experience, then that may well be a much better pathway.  Only one of you needs to apply as the main applicant.  

The problem with a 482 visa is that it's just a temporary contract.  After a few years you can apply for a permanent visa (the 186), but you still need the same qualifications, experience, points etc - and as you still need to be under 45.  You can get an idea of how long-winded, uncertain and stressful the 186 process is by reading the threads about it on these forums.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, The DJing Engineer said:

 

thanks for the reply.

 

you;re right about the HQs. My company have offices in the centre of the business districts in Sydney and Melbourne. However, my job is "home-based". I sit at home waiting for my next job away, so proximity to the office would not be an issue if I continue with the same role.

My partner would need to be working in a hospital or other such facility, which I guess are more "spread around". A few years in the sticks before a city move might not be such a bad thing 🙂

I'm going to seek some professional advice regarding the visas now anyway (since it could be either myself or my partner who has the best chance, I also have a first cousin living in Sydney since 2010 that I only just remembered! so that may change things too)

It will all depend on what your contract says.

If it says "We employ DJing Eng on a full time contract, based from Our Big Office, Sydney. DJ Eng will be allowed to aork from home and is expected to work on remote jobs as required"

Then you fail the regional employment test

If it says "We emply DJ on a full time contract, from his home address with no requirement to attend our office in Big City"

The you pass the regional employment test

 

I know of almost no major multi-national corporation that would allow an employee not to have a "declared base office" at a building in their estate. Many will allow you to habitually work from home or on project sites, but they will still have a contractual base office in one of their locations - and whilst the actual experince of the emply would be no different in either version of the contract wording, the compliance with the Regional Visa conditions are poles apart (i.e. one complies and the other totally does not)

 

{Note: because they have offices in Perth/Melbourne/Sydney even if you were contractually based from home, you would not be able to work on projects in those cities in your companies offices - this means no pre-sales work or in-office preliminary projects - I asked this specifically when I got my visa as my career is similar in travel nature - - I can't see a company wanting to employ an employee that has so many barriers to deployment so in your case I would be shying awat from the 491} 

Edited by Ausvisitor
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