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Wannabeaussieguyandgal

Spanish/French teacher

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Hi does anyone know if there is currently a need for Modern Foreign Languages teachers? We are hoping to apply for either a 189 or 491 (my "de facto" girlfriend is in Mental Health and I have been a teacher in the UK for 11 years. 

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For immigration purposes there is no such thing as de facto 'girlfriend'. There are openings for teachers who can teach a language other than English, but you might be better off with 'mental health' for the mandatory pre-migration skills assessment. May I suggest that you consult a registered migration agent for an assessment?


Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Wannabeaussieguyandgal said:

Hi does anyone know if there is currently a need for Modern Foreign Languages teachers? We are hoping to apply for either a 189 or 491 (my "de facto" girlfriend is in Mental Health and I have been a teacher in the UK for 11 years. 

Are you asking whether there is a need, or whether you can get a visa?  Those are two different questions. 

Are you aware that you must have a four-year qualification, both for Immigration and to be allowed to teach in Australia?  

I noticed you posted elsewhere about your partner having a chronic medical condition.   If that's the case, then I would investigate that first, because there's no point going any further if that's a problem.   Immigration don't care what the condition is.  What they care about is, how much will her condition cost the taxpayer in treatments and medication over the rest of her life?   There is a threshold.   

The best way to get an answer is to have a consultation with an agent called George Lombard.  He specialises in dealing with medical issues.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

What they care about is, how much will her condition cost the taxpayer in treatments and medication over the rest of her life?   There is a threshold.   

It's actually now over a 10 year period for a permanent visa, but the advice to get a specialist opinion is very sound advice.


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. 

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

Are you asking whether there is a need, or whether you can get a visa?  Those are two different questions. 

Are you aware that you must have a four-year qualification, both for Immigration and to be allowed to teach in Australia?  

I noticed you posted elsewhere about your partner having a chronic medical condition.   If that's the case, then I would investigate that first, because there's no point going any further if that's a problem.   Immigration don't care what the condition is.  What they care about is, how much will her condition cost the taxpayer in treatments and medication over the rest of her life?   There is a threshold.   

The best way to get an answer is to have a consultation with an agent called George Lombard.  He specialises in dealing with medical issues.

Thanks for this, we have an appointment early July with a MARA registered agent for exactly this reason. Based on the calculations I've done it doesn't seem that the cost of her condition would pass the threshold, but we'll see

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2 hours ago, wrussell said:

For immigration purposes there is no such thing as de facto 'girlfriend'. There are openings for teachers who can teach a language other than English, but you might be better off with 'mental health' for the mandatory pre-migration skills assessment. May I suggest that you consult a registered migration agent for an assessment?

Sorry, I was just being facetious - we have lived together for a long time, but with no plans to marry ever. Got an appointment booked. 

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

Are you asking whether there is a need, or whether you can get a visa?  Those are two different questions. 

Are you aware that you must have a four-year qualification, both for Immigration and to be allowed to teach in Australia?  

I noticed you posted elsewhere about your partner having a chronic medical condition.   If that's the case, then I would investigate that first, because there's no point going any further if that's a problem.   Immigration don't care what the condition is.  What they care about is, how much will her condition cost the taxpayer in treatments and medication over the rest of her life?   There is a threshold.   

The best way to get an answer is to have a consultation with an agent called George Lombard.  He specialises in dealing with medical issues.

Both questions I guess. My degree was a 4 year languages with interpreting and translation course, plus a 5th year doing the PGCE. It seems that Eastern Asian languages are more popular than European ones so I wondered if any French/Spanish teachers had managed to get a visa and a job before. 

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1 hour ago, Wannabeaussieguyandgal said:

Both questions I guess. My degree was a 4 year languages with interpreting and translation course, plus a 5th year doing the PGCE. It seems that Eastern Asian languages are more popular than European ones so I wondered if any French/Spanish teachers had managed to get a visa and a job before. 

There are some schools in WA that teach French - as you say Asian languages are more popular.  Is your partner a qualified MH nurse?  may be better to come on her skills?

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4 hours ago, ali said:

There are some schools in WA that teach French - as you say Asian languages are more popular.  Is your partner a qualified MH nurse?  may be better to come on her skills?

She's not, she's in early intervention but would like to do CBT. She is hoping to do further training before we go - she has the luxury of age on her side! 

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6 hours ago, Wannabeaussieguyandgal said:

She's not, she's in early intervention but would like to do CBT. She is hoping to do further training before we go - she has the luxury of age on her side! 

Unless she’s a psychologist or a nurse she’s not going to get much traction with CBT (or any other mental health for that matter) for employment prospects. Check out AHPRA as most mental health practitioners reside in one of their categories.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Wannabeaussieguyandgal said:

This is beginning to look like it's going to be a very difficult journey! 

Yes, it is, I'm afraid.  As I posted on another thread, most Brits have grown up with the idea that Australia is a young country crying out for new migrants - we've all heard of Ten Pound Poms and most of us know of relatives or friends or friends of friends who did it.  But the Ten Pound Poms were 70 years ago.  I migrated 35 years ago and the application process was a doddle. 

Now, Australia is a mature country that largely trains its own workforce.  It isn't much different from the UK, with the government trying to strike a balance between importing the skills the country needs, and placating voters worried about "foreigners taking our jobs".  With the sharp rise in unemployment caused by Covid, it's likely they'll be erring more on the side of placating the voters.   

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Sorry, I was just being facetious

THEY have no sense of humour.

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Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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8 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Yes, it is, I'm afraid.  As I posted on another thread, most Brits have grown up with the idea that Australia is a young country crying out for new migrants - we've all heard of Ten Pound Poms and most of us know of relatives or friends or friends of friends who did it.  But the Ten Pound Poms were 70 years ago.  I migrated 35 years ago and the application process was a doddle. 

Now, Australia is a mature country that largely trains its own workforce.  It isn't much different from the UK, with the government trying to strike a balance between importing the skills the country needs, and placating voters worried about "foreigners taking our jobs".  With the sharp rise in unemployment caused by Covid, it's likely they'll be erring more on the side of placating the voters.   

It is a shame, but it is what it is. If all else fails I suppose there is New Zealand or Canada to try! 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Wannabeaussieguyandgal said:

It is a shame, but it is what it is. If all else fails I suppose there is New Zealand or Canada to try! 

Canada is probably harder given your chosen teaching profession (we lived there for quite some time)

Whilst teachers are in demand, Spanish is not widely taught in Canada and every child has been taught French for years and you will be hard pressed to find a teacher (of any subject) that isn't fluent in French. Also it isn't taught as a foreign language - it's taught in the same way French would be taught in France or English in the UK - as a first language.

Unless you are C2 fluent (i.e. you can't be distinguished from a native speaker) you will find that in Ontario and Quebec that you high school students will speak better French than you do in general.

The immigration rules for Canada are very different to Australia, they use a career priority system and teacher has not been a Cat Zero profession for some time so it's quite difficult to get it.

Can't comment on NZ

Edited by Ausvisitor
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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Ausvisitor said:

 

Edited by Ausvisitor
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