Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

Maria18

subclass 190 PR visa

Recommended Posts

Hey

I am just looking for some clarification with a few things that I am struggling to find a straight answer to!

Firstly, myself, partner (not married but living together) and my son, age 12 are wanting to move to Australia for approx 2/3 years. I am a Mental Health Nurse and am 33 (34 in November). I have almost 2 years work experience since qualifying. I have been told my options are a TSS sponsered work visa subclass 482, or a permanent residency visa subclass 190. 

My total points are 65 and with a state sponser I can get another 5, making it up to 70. I don't mind what part of Australia we go to at this stage, we are quite open to anywhere, but did have a preference for QLD. I have just learnt that for QLD 5 years work experience is needed, and by then my son will be 15 and going through his GCSE's which means I cannot take him away and out of school. 

I have quite a narrow window to make this move for my son and his age, as i'd like to settle him into a schoo justl before year 9 or throughout year 9 ideally. (From Sept 2021).

I have read that 70 points quite low, and my partner is not on the skilled list, is this correct? Do I have a chance of getting in on a 190 visa with 2 years work experience and 70 points? Or would I be best going for a TSS sponsered visa where I need minimum 2 years experience, and will have to get a sponser before I apply for the visa?

We have thought about my partner doing a plastering course this is something she has always said she would enjoy. She is currently a senior health care assistant, so a bit of a career change, but she seems to be quite interested in becoming a plasterer! My only question on this is, if she was to do a short course and gain a qualification in plastering, is this definitely on the skills shortage list for Australia, and would her qualification add points without any or much work experience?

I have been told by one migration agent that with 70 points I have a good chance of getting invited, and by another that I would not have much chance with only 70 points.

Thank you for any help you can give me... 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If all you want is 2/3 years in Australia and you have no intention of staying permanently, then a TSS 482 visa is designed for you.   The whole process is much quicker (because Immigration knows that employers won't wait a year for an employee to arrive!).    The difficulty is that you need to find an employer to sponsor you, and I have no idea what the chances are in your profession.  Maybe someone else can offer some advice on that.

In your shoes, I wouldn't even contemplate a 190 visa unless you have deep pockets.   Moving to another country is an expensive business.  It's not just the visa fees and air fares.  If you were a singleton with no kids, you could arrive in Australia with a suitcase and find a share house - but as a parent, you'll either need to ship all your furniture and belongings, or buy a complete new household from scratch when you arrive (rental places in Australia are not furnished).  Either option costs thousands.  You'll need to budget for four weeks in a holiday let on arrival, while you look for a long-term rental. And you'll need to budget for a few months with no income while you look for work (with no access to unemployment benefit).  A commonly quoted figure for all that is around 30K.

If you're planning to stay permanently, you can look on that cost as an investment.   If you're just coming for a short-term adventure, it's just money out the door - and then you'll have to face very similar costs when you go home again. 

If you can get an employer to sponsor you for a 482, the employer may or may not contribute to your relocation costs (worth asking), but you would know you have the security of a job from day 1. Plus you may find the employer will be helpful with getting you settled in, especially if you're going somewhere in the country (for instance, we had a member recently who was moving to Tasmania and contacted the employer for a recommendation on a holiday let - and she was offered a free stay at a staff member's home).  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your reply. I do think the TSS visa seems better for me to go for, my only worry with this is that I will be tied to the same job for the 2-3 years, and I have also been told from my agent that with the TSS visa I am entitled to pay school fees, wheras with the PR it is included, as is medicare. Is this not the case with the 482 do you know? 

Thanks again for your advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are currently a UK resident, you’ll be covered by Medicare under the reciprocal agreement anyway. 

You will have to pay school fees, but at least it’s a cost you can predict, unlike the uncertainty of how long it will take to find a job

  • Like 1

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a question (please don't be offended), is your partner the childs father?  If not, you will also need to look at getting permission from the absent parent.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, no, but I have spoken to my sons dad about this and asked his permission, which he has given. My son curently sees his dad once a week, so we have worked out that he would probably see him more if he was to come back and stay in the 6 weeks holidays for 3 weeks. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Maria18 said:

Hey, no, but I have spoken to my sons dad about this and asked his permission, which he has given. My son curently sees his dad once a week, so we have worked out that he would probably see him more if he was to come back and stay in the 6 weeks holidays for 3 weeks. 

I believe his dad will need to provide a statutory declaration giving permission. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, he will. He has agree to this when and if that time comes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, Maria18 said:

Hey, no, but I have spoken to my sons dad about this and asked his permission, which he has given. My son curently sees his dad once a week, so we have worked out that he would probably see him more if he was to come back and stay in the 6 weeks holidays for 3 weeks. 

Unless one of you is chaperoning the child on the flight, don't underestimate just how hard 26+ hours travelling alone is on a kid.

Also have a think about how you'd feel if 2 weeks into the 3 a COVID style lock happened, would you be happy with them quarantining alone in Australia on their return?

Immigration with parents in two countries is much harder than you think, and 3 weeks a year rather than one day a week is not remotely the same thing in terms of retaining a relationship

 

I say this, having been that kid, so I know just how hard this is on them

Edited by Ausvisitor
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

My post isn’t about my sons relationship with his dad. 

My son has been to Australia. He did the 22 hour flight and he loved it. We would be going for 2-3 years and he wants to do that. I know my sons relationship with his dad, and it’s not a problem for him to go to Australia. He wants to. His dad is well and truly on board. He hasn’t plans for the future with his own family to move out there and has family there also. 

Im not sure when I said he’d be coming back to the UK alone. We’d be coming back also to visit family.

 

Edited by Maria18
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also to add, I had my dad in another country all my life. I actually loved it. I got to visit every year. My son isn’t very close to his dad.  He sees him maybe 1 hour a week to nip to McDonald’s. 

We are not staying in the UK to keep that going when 95% of the time, my som hasn’t much interest in doing that anyway. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Calm down Maria people are only trying to help 👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that. Apologies if I came across abrupt. I just feel very passionate regarding some things that I cannot post on here! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Maria18 said:

Yes, he will. He has agree to this when and if that time comes.

An agent has posted on another similar thread that it’s form 1229 that needs to be completed.

Good luck! 👍

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Maria18 said:

My post isn’t about my sons relationship with his dad. 

My son has been to Australia. He did the 22 hour flight and he loved it. We would be going for 2-3 years and he wants to do that. I know my sons relationship with his dad, and it’s not a problem for him to go to Australia. He wants to. His dad is well and truly on board. He hasn’t plans for the future with his own family to move out there and has family there also. 

Im not sure when I said he’d be coming back to the UK alone. We’d be coming back also to visit family.

 

Hi Maria

Didn't mean to upset or wind you up, I was just posting about how I felt when my parents split across continents.

You know your kid, and you know how they'll take to it, I just wanted to add a view from a kid's point of view, but it was just that "one" kids point of view, I'm sure others probably reacted different.

Take care and good luck with the application process

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 19/06/2020 at 09:54, Maria18 said:

Thank you for your reply. I do think the TSS visa seems better for me to go for, my only worry with this is that I will be tied to the same job for the 2-3 years, and I have also been told from my agent that with the TSS visa I am entitled to pay school fees, wheras with the PR it is included, as is medicare. Is this not the case with the 482 do you know? 

Thanks again for your advice.

I’m a little confused about your time line imperatives - do you want him back in UK  by Sept 21 for year 9? That’d be running it pretty close!  Remember that the Australian education system is not the British system. Year level names may be different and the essential Aus years are 11&12 which start in the January of the year that the child turns 16.  (No GCSEs in Aus). Pretty much across the board in Aus a child aged 12 now would be in year 7 so in 2021 would be in year 8 (unless they’ve only just turned 12 in which case they would be year 6 this year) so you wouldn’t be aiming for year 9 in 2021.   Are you intending to stay only 2/3 years? In which case the issue is when will he need to be back in order to avoid being penalised for not having been in the U.K. system?

In answer to your question though, yes, in some states you will have to pay school fees - anything between 5 and 10kpa depending on where you go. Some states don’t (yet) charge so very much luck of the draw where you end up.  Also, yes, you will be covered by the reciprocal agreement for Medicare but that isn’t full Medicare and it covers only “necessary” medical interventions.  Some things you may consider necessary may be technically elective, so budget in private health care insurance as well.

Another thing to bear in mind is the cost of flying back for 3 weeks every year (bang goes your annual leave and a huge chunk of your salary ) so, at 12+ a trip alone might be the more attainable option but, given the current C19 situation with possible quarantine implications that might be a trickier prospect. I sent my son back at 9 on his own, it wasn’t a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

When looking at timings if you are thinking about a temp visa rather than a PR you also need to consider post-school options.

If your son has plans to go to university, you won't qualify for Aussie home fees unless you get PR. If you plan to go to uni in the UK you need to be back resident in the UK before the start of year 11 (i.e. by August 31st of the year your son goes into year 11 - GCSE year) otherwise regardless of residence/citizenship you don't qualify as a UK home student either so would have to pay overseas fees in the UK

 

It's a way off, but getting this one wrong adds about £60k to university degree cost, and it's an addition that you can't finance through the usual student finance routes. I know lots of people who wished they had known this before making decisions on when to come back from overseas adventures.

Edited by Ausvisitor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thank you for your replies.

 I was meaning I hope to move to Aus either before my son reaches year 9, or throughout year 9 (When he is age 13 and a half). We are looking at around 18 months before we get there after the application, invitation, etc and savings. 

We are aiming for approximately Nov 2021 -Feb 2022 (ish, and depending on visas etc). We are probably going to go for the 190 state sponsered or the 491 regional sponsered visa. The TSS visa does seem more applicable to me, I understand that, but I have worked out that financially we may be better off going for PR as can stay as long as we want on this and the cost of school is covered, as opposed to paying 5-6 AUD per year (2.5/3000 pounds). The cost of the 190 visa seems to balance out when you look at the yearly cost of school.

 

 

Edited by Maria18
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, Maria18 said:

We are aiming for approximately Nov 2021 -Feb 2022 (ish, and depending on visas etc). We are probably going to go for the 190 state sponsered or the 491 regional sponsered visa. The TSS visa does seem more applicable to me, I understand that, but I have worked out that financially we may be better off going for PR as can stay as long as we want on this and the cost of school is covered, as opposed to paying 5-6 AUD per year (2.5/3000 pounds). The cost of the 190 visa seems to balance out when you look at the yearly cost of school.

As others have said, the problem with going for the 491/190 is that it takes so long to process, and you'll need to get back to the UK before your son starts year 11. Otherwise you'll be paying full international fees for him to go to university, because you won't fulfil the residency requirements.  

If you go for the 482, the processing time is much faster so you'll be on your way earlier.  Given your timeframes you'd only want a 2 year contract and let's face it, even if it isn't the perfect job, you could stick it out for 2 years. 

I'd say if you go for the 190/491, you'd need to plan on the basis that your son will complete his education in Australia, including university - but another factor to consider is that by the time he's finished uni, he'll be an adult with lots of Australian friends, probably including an Aussie girlfriend, and he may not be willing to return to the UK should you wish to go home. That may or may not be an issue for you.

I don't agree with Quoll about the "limited" nature of Medicare cover - it's true that if you read the letter of the law, she's right, but in practice I've seen many Brits have operations and procedures under Medicare which I would never have expected would be covered. 

 

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m still unclear. Are you aiming to move to Australia or just have a couple of years here? If you aim to move (and stay) then go for the PR and as long as you arrive before your son is just 16 or just about to turn 16 to enter year 11 then he will be ok with Aus education.   If you only want a 2/3 year visit then I’d say you’re probably going to be short on time but could opt for the TSS and aim to get him back to uk to do GCSE and Alevels if he has any aspirations of further education but you’d have to leave about now and that’s not going to be possible for a whole range of reasons.  Don’t think that he could do yr 12 In Australia then go back to a U.K. Uni - Aus scores don’t rank as well as A levels and he would be up for international fees at a U.K. Uni (yes, even though he is a citizen) because he won’t have been resident in country for 3 years before starting Uni.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Quoll said:

I’m still unclear. Are you aiming to move to Australia or just have a couple of years here? If you aim to move (and stay) then go for the PR and as long as you arrive before your son is just 16 or just about to turn 16 to enter year 11 then he will be ok with Aus education.   If you only want a 2/3 year visit then I’d say you’re probably going to be short on time but could opt for the TSS and aim to get him back to uk to do GCSE and Alevels if he has any aspirations of further education but you’d have to leave about now and that’s not going to be possible for a whole range of reasons.  Don’t think that he could do yr 12 In Australia then go back to a U.K. Uni - Aus scores don’t rank as well as A levels and he would be up for international fees at a U.K. Uni (yes, even though he is a citizen) because he won’t have been resident in country for 3 years before starting Uni.

He could certainly do a UNI course with Aussie yr 12 qualifications if he scores highly enough that isn'y a problem

The issue is the cost

If you make it back to the UK before year 11 starts you can do the 3 year academic residence to make Univeristy "home fee status" - this means Uni cost £9,250 which you can get a student loan for (so no payment until after you graduate)

If you miss the date by a day (so you land in the UK on the 1st Sept of the child's year 11) then (in this example Bath Engineering) is £22,300 per year, which you can't get a student loan for and has to paid as you go term by term. So by the time you finish the course you've spent £67,000 in actual cash before you've paid to live there

Your UK resident pupil studying alongside them may never pay a penny of their tuition depending on what they earn after graduation

 

For the same course (Bath Engineering) the A-Level entry requirements is A*AA (which needs to include A level Chemistry and Maths) - (incidentally it's higher than Oxford or Cambridge)

The equivalent Australian pass mark is an ATAR of 97 (which means you scored in the top 3% of your high school peers - it's not quite that simple but it's close)

For comparison last year 9% of UK students got 3As or higher at A Level - so you are correct it needs a higher mark at ATAR to get into a good UK University

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/06/2020 at 09:38, Maria18 said:

Thank you for your replies.

 I was meaning I hope to move to Aus either before my son reaches year 9, or throughout year 9 (When he is age 13 and a half). We are looking at around 18 months before we get there after the application, invitation, etc and savings. 

We are aiming for approximately Nov 2021 -Feb 2022 (ish, and depending on visas etc). We are probably going to go for the 190 state sponsered or the 491 regional sponsered visa. The TSS visa does seem more applicable to me, I understand that, but I have worked out that financially we may be better off going for PR as can stay as long as we want on this and the cost of school is covered, as opposed to paying 5-6 AUD per year (2.5/3000 pounds). The cost of the 190 visa seems to balance out when you look at the yearly cost of school.

 

 

School costs aren't  'covered' on a PR visa. Which means you will pay something. Depending on what subjects your son takes the school will charge for them. For example; the school my daughter attends charges around $350 per year for things like newsletters, photocopying, school diary, guest speakers, locker hire etc, then on top of this are the charges per subject, this could be $25 Maths, $150 Food tech, $50 English etc. These charges don't include books either, every year students are issued with a booklist, with what they are required to buy to participate fully in the lesson. So while it's not as much as $5K per year on a temp visa, it isn't free either. Schools are  businesses at the end of the day and each student has an 'account', at least they do in VIC anyway :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, cheese n pickle said:

School costs aren't  'covered' on a PR visa. Which means you will pay something. Depending on what subjects your son takes the school will charge for them. For example; the school my daughter attends charges around $350 per year for things like newsletters, photocopying, school diary, guest speakers, locker hire etc, then on top of this are the charges per subject, this could be $25 Maths, $150 Food tech, $50 English etc. These charges don't include books either, every year students are issued with a booklist, with what they are required to buy to participate fully in the lesson. So while it's not as much as $5K per year on a temp visa, it isn't free either. Schools are  businesses at the end of the day and each student has an 'account', at least they do in VIC anyway 🙂

School costs like the one's you mention aren't covered for citizens either, there are parts of education that you have to pay for. It's the same in every country. Our daughter goes to a state 6th form college in the UK and we have spent over £500 on books (text and novels/poetry) in the two years. 

Yes schooling isn't totally free, but it is close, and someone who can afford the £20-30k cost of migration for a family should have no issue in cover $350 a year for a couple of years

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all your responses. 

We are really unsure if we want to go for 2- 3 years or stay longer... We really can't say until we give it a go and see what Australia offers us. All we know is that we want to go to try it out and if it doesn't work, we can say we tried! 

Ah ok, so quite like the UK then in the way schooling works. (Some books/equipment etc).

I have just heard back from APHRA that it will take approximately 3 months yet to be invited to register, so I am looking at 6 months before I can travel (you have 3 months after they invite you to register to present in person in Aus). After that comes the skills assessment, which I am hoping to begin soon as we have 12 months then to upload documents etc...(English test), and then I can put in an EOI. 

I'm hoping by then and knowing points for sure etc that we will know to go for a 190 or a regional 491... 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you for all your responses. 
We are really unsure if we want to go for 2- 3 years or stay longer... We really can't say until we give it a go and see what Australia offers us. All we know is that we want to go to try it out and if it doesn't work, we can say we tried! 
Ah ok, so quite like the UK then in the way schooling works. (Some books/equipment etc).
I have just heard back from APHRA that it will take approximately 3 months yet to be invited to register, so I am looking at 6 months before I can travel (you have 3 months after they invite you to register to present in person in Aus). After that comes the skills assessment, which I am hoping to begin soon as we have 12 months then to upload documents etc...(English test), and then I can put in an EOI. 
I'm hoping by then and knowing points for sure etc that we will know to go for a 190 or a regional 491... 
 
 

My wife and I and son have got the 190 at the moment and are looking to go in October all fingers crossed. It was a long process but once we submitted it all happened very quickly. It helps having a good migration company guiding you, they can run through everything before it’s submitted then you don’t waste time sending wrong information.

I’d say if you have the cash get the 190 and if your good with paperwork and can prove all past education and work you won’t have an issue. The visa will give you the choice on how long you stay so you can really try and settle in. I to had family stuff happening and people can be a bit forth coming with their opinions tyts for sure, have you thought about this have you thought about that? When in truth you think about nothing else and are fully aware of the task your undertaking.

Good luck to you and I hope all goes well. We have succeeded in the visa part and now the hard part comes of getting over there and starting a whole new life but how amazingly exciting it is.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×