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Harrimad13

Welfare Worker

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Various people have mentioned to me that as a Probation officer there is a chance I could apply for a skilled visa under the welfare Worker umbrella. 

I can see no way of doing this online, I find alot of the information on the main website confusing and unhelpful. 

My partner's family all like in QLD and he has had permeant residency in the past which has since expired but from what we can see it should not be too difficult to renew. Our main option would seem to be a spousal visa but it looks as though my partner would have to return to Australia within 12 months of his resident return being approved, leaving me behind for up to 2 years or more whilst I wait for my spousal visa? 

Is that right? Has anyone else had this experience? 

We have been together 5 hears, have a mortgage ect 

HELP! 

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53 minutes ago, Harrimad13 said:

My partner's family all live in QLD and he has had permeant residency in the past which has since expired but from what we can see it should not be too difficult to renew. Our main option would seem to be a spousal visa

If your partner's entire family are in Queensland, then he should stand a good chance of getting a RRV (resident return visa).  The longer he's been out of Australia, the worse his chances, so he shouldn't delay. 

If he's been outside Australia for a long time, it's likely you are right - he'll only get 12 months to return and set up residence.  However you could return with him on a tourist visa, and then apply for a partner visa once you're in Australia.  Then you'd get a bridging visa, which would let you stay in Australia until your partner visa is approved (which as you say, can be a year or more).  The risk is that you might not be allowed to work while you're on the bridging visa, but it is possible to apply for special permission to work if you're experiencing hardship. 

A consultation with a good migration agent would be a good investment.   It will cost you money, but then a partner visa is expensive, and you don't want to throw your money away by getting it wrong.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)

Hi,

 

I am interested in this also, my specialism is youth justice and the only posts that are relevant on the STSOL are Welfare Worker or Residential Worker. I would be interested to see how you get on.

Thanks, Helen

Edited by Helenred

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We are going to go for a skilled visa under my partners skill (vehicle painter) purely because he has 24 years experience. 

It would seem as long as you have 2 years experience post qualification or 5 years experience without a qualification you should be able to do it? 

Definitely speak to an agent. We have gone with the Down Under Centre 👍

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11 minutes ago, Harrimad13 said:

We are going to go for a skilled visa under my partners skill (vehicle painter) purely because he has 24 years experience. 

It would seem as long as you have 2 years experience post qualification or 5 years experience without a qualification you should be able to do it? 

Definitely speak to an agent. We have gone with the Down Under Centre 👍

If the person you are dealing with isn’t themselves a registered migration agent, you will be in for a potential disaster. 

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24 minutes ago, Harrimad13 said:

We are going to go for a skilled visa under my partners skill (vehicle painter) purely because he has 24 years experience. 

It would seem as long as you have 2 years experience post qualification or 5 years experience without a qualification you should be able to do it? 

Definitely speak to an agent. We have gone with the Down Under Centre 👍

Great, thank you. Do the DUC want an initial fee?

Good Luck!

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And it appears that you can get a  Visa under one occupation and apply for others once you are there - unless I have got that totally wrong!

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1 minute ago, Helenred said:

Great, thank you. Do the DUC want an initial fee?

Good Luck!

I spoke with Wes and he seemed to want to be sure that we were eligible before we signed up. He gave a lot of advice so we could make an informed decision. 

It's worth a chat with him for sure! 

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1 hour ago, Helenred said:

And it appears that you can get a  Visa under one occupation and apply for others once you are there - unless I have got that totally wrong!

If you get a permanent visa, you can do any job you like and you don't have to apply for another visa.  If you get a temporary visa, then there are restrictions.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Harrimad13 said:

We are going to go for a skilled visa under my partners skill (vehicle painter) purely because he has 24 years experience. 

It would seem as long as you have 2 years experience post qualification or 5 years experience without a qualification you should be able to do it? 

Definitely speak to an agent. We have gone with the Down Under Centre 👍

So, were you advised that the RRV wasn't an option?   


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Helenred said:

Great, thank you. Do the DUC want an initial fee?

Good Luck!

The DUC is a high profile agency but it doesn't mean it's the best.  If you go with them, make sure you're looked after by an actual MARA registered agent and not just an office staffer - it does happen.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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3 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

If you get a permanent visa, you can do any job you like and you don't have to apply for another visa.  If you get a temporary visa, then there are restrictions.

I see... so if I got a VISA for STSOL I would have to do the job on the list?

Thanks

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Harrimad13 said:

I spoke with Wes and he seemed to want to be sure that we were eligible before we signed up. He gave a lot of advice so we could make an informed decision. 

It's worth a chat with him for sure! 

Wes isn't a MARA Registered Agent. Perhaps that is what VERYSTORMY meant. There is an agent attached to the DUC, but it is not Wes.

Edited by mrsmac

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12 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

So, were you advised that the RRV wasn't an option?   

No it's not that it isn't an option for Welfare officer it's just my partners skill is stronger due to the years of experience. 

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1 minute ago, Harrimad13 said:

No it's not that it isn't an option for Welfare officer it's just my partners skill is stronger due to the years of experience. 

Oh wait sorry you mean resident return. 

It is an option for my partner but it's not going to help me. We would probably have to live apart whilst I wait for a partner visa ect. Or I would be unable to work whilst on a bridging visa .. it's just not for us.

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Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, Harrimad13 said:

Oh wait sorry you mean resident return. 

It is an option for my partner but it's not going to help me. We would probably have to live apart whilst I wait for a partner visa ect. Or I would be unable to work whilst on a bridging visa .. it's just not for us.

My worry is that a skilled visa is so uncertain.  It's a highly competitive process and only applicants with the very highest points get picked each year - the rest just sit there until they expire.  A great many applicants miss out, even though they've got all the qualifications and experience on the list, and that's their money down the drain.   If you do miss out, then you'll have to go for the partner visa anyway, and you'll have lost another year or two.

Whereas as long as you have a solid relationship and you've got a good agent to prepare the application, there's a high degree of confidence that you'll get a partner visa.  It's true there's a high rejection rate, but that's because there are so many fraudulent applications (people getting married to get a visa to Australia) and also that a lot of people stuff up the application. Neither of those things apply to you.

Also conside, the waiting time for a partner visa is quoted as two years, but that includes "high risk" countries which have to go through more stringent procedures.   Applications from "safe" countries like the UK are processed faster. 

If your partner applies for a RRV, he will likely get a 12 month one.  You immediately apply for the partner visa, and then you both stay in the UK until the last month of the RRV.  He then moves to Australia.  Once he's in Australia, he's fine - he doesn't need the RRV unless he wants to travel overseas again.   Once he's rented a house, opened a bank account and got a job, he applies to renew his RRV again, which will be no problem because he's got all those strong ties set up.  You can always accompany him on a tourist visa to choose a home etc.  You may then have to go home again, but it will be for a few more months because your application has already been in the queue for a year.  

I'm not an expert but I believe that would work.  Worth running past an agent - and make sure he's a MARA registered one, not some assistant without registration.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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32 minutes ago, Harrimad13 said:

Oh wait sorry you mean resident return. 

It is an option for my partner but it's not going to help me. We would probably have to live apart whilst I wait for a partner visa ect. Or I would be unable to work whilst on a bridging visa .. it's just not for us.

If you are n a bridging visa having applied for a spouse visa you get full working rights. 

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