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Cameron Shean

General advice on getting started

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Hey ladies and gents,

I am looking at starting my skilled visa or spouse visa application in the next few days. My fiancé is an Australian citizen, we have our flights booked for the 31st of August (travelling for 9-12 months then looking to settle, hoping covid-19 doesn’t disrupt it completely, but we’re preparing for some delays).

However, I am unsure whether to apply for the skilled-visa as I have a Bsc hons degree  in sports conditioning and rehabilitation and have worked for a private company as a strength/rehabilitation coach for 5 years now! So I’m unsure whether to apply under the job title of a physiotherapist as that isn’t entirely true, due to me not calling myself a physio!

Also, regardless of what visa I end up applying for, I have considered getting a migrant agent to help with my application papers... is this something you guys would recommend?

 

any help would be massively appreciated!

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You're not a physiotherapist though are you? You wouldnt come under the AHPRA conditions for registration so you cant call yourself one.

When you say travelling - do you mean to Australia or around the world? If around the world then put your spouse visa in asap and it may be ready before you are proposing to move to Australia.  If to Australia straight away you've left it rather late - they're taking 12-18 months to be granted.  You probably should talk to an agent to see what your best options are

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21 minutes ago, Quoll said:

You're not a physiotherapist though are you? You wouldnt come under the AHPRA conditions for registration so you cant call yourself one.

When you say travelling - do you mean to Australia or around the world? If around the world then put your spouse visa in asap and it may be ready before you are proposing to move to Australia.  If to Australia straight away you've left it rather late - they're taking 12-18 months to be granted.  You probably should talk to an agent to see what your best options are

Thanks for the quick response!

Noted about the Physiotherapist title.

So we are doing 6months of travelling Australia on a holiday visa (aslong as the covid-19 Situation allows us by then) then will be off for 6 months elsewhere... with then plans to settle in Australia!

 Thanks once again!

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2 hours ago, Cameron Shean said:

Hey ladies and gents,

I am looking at starting my skilled visa or spouse visa application in the next few days. My fiancé is an Australian citizen, we have our flights booked for the 31st of August (travelling for 9-12 months then looking to settle, hoping covid-19 doesn’t disrupt it completely, but we’re preparing for some delays).

However, I am unsure whether to apply for the skilled-visa as I have a Bsc hons degree  in sports conditioning and rehabilitation and have worked for a private company as a strength/rehabilitation coach for 5 years now! So I’m unsure whether to apply under the job title of a physiotherapist as that isn’t entirely true, due to me not calling myself a physio!

Also, regardless of what visa I end up applying for, I have considered getting a migrant agent to help with my application papers... is this something you guys would recommend?

 

any help would be massively appreciated!

Not a hope in hell of getting a positive outcome as a Physiotherapist.

There are many people/professions that provide some  physical therapy, however Physiotherapist is a reserved professional term and the only way to qualify as a Physio is through a degree in Physiotherapy

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Posted (edited)

There is absolutely no point in applying for a skilled visa.   The whole process takes just as long as the partner visa - PLUS it is uncertain.   You can apply for a skilled visa but there is no guarantee you'll get one.  The process is highly competitive.   For instance, you only need to score 65 points to submit an application - but currently only those with over 90 points are being successful.  The rest just lose their money.

If you are eligible for a partner visa and you use an agent, you're not likely to have any problems.   Partner visas have a high refusal rate, but that's because (a) there's a large number of fraudulent applications and (b) a lot of genuine applicants make a mess of the application, because they don't realise the extent of evidence required. 

If you're worried about not having an independent visa, don't be.   Depending how long you've been together, you might get a temporary visa to start with, which is linked to your partner.  But once you get the permanent visa, it's yours, and you retain it even if your relationship breaks up. 

 

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)

Your big issue will be timeframes. 

It takes about a year to get a partner visa.   You can visit Australia in the meantime (on a tourist visa like any holidaymaker) but not stay or work, so that might work for you.  If you're planning to travel around anyway, then I'd say that would be your best option.   Get the application in, forget about it, and head off on your trip.

Your other option is to come to Australia on a tourist visa, then apply for the partner visa once you're onshore.   You would then get a bridging visa which would allow you to stay in Australia while you wait for the partner visa to come through.  However, you then can't leave Australia without applying for a special visa, and you need to show good reason why you need to travel.  You may also find it difficult to get work, as employers are suspicious of bridging visas. 

On top of all that, there's coronavirus. As the partner of an Australian  citizen, you can apply for special permission to enter Australia in August (when the travel bans will still be in place).    Since your partner isn't actually living in Australia at present, I have no idea whether you'd be successful.  

The bigger problem is that Australian citizens aren't  allowed to leave the country without a good reason (such as work or compassionate grounds).   So once she arrived, your partner wouldn't be able to go travelling again.   The government has said, several times, that the travel ban will stay in place until September, and probably a lot longer - some are saying it will be well into 2021.  

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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The risk with rocking up as a tourist, lying to Immigration about your intentions could land you in hot water and see you turned around at the border because they think you might be an overstayer - and banned for 3 years.  Far more sensible to get it in now and hope for the best

 

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2 hours ago, Quoll said:

The risk with rocking up as a tourist, lying to Immigration about your intentions could land you in hot water and see you turned around at the border because they think you might be an overstayer - and banned for 3 years.  Far more sensible to get it in now and hope for the best

 

No one has suggested lying to immigration in this thread. In any case, it is not illegal to lodge an onshore visa application whilst holding a visitor visa. In considering visitor visas, Departmental policy instructs officers not to consider “whether this person will legally lodge another application” but rather whether they will abide by the terms of their current visa. 

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. 

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I’d say one of your problems will be that you can’t get in at the moment as a non citizen or resident. And I’ll be amazed if that’s lifted before the end of august

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Just wanted to jump in on this topic as confused about entry into Australia this year?

If still residing in the UK at present but waiting to move to Australia (I'm the Australian Citizen,  partner has 3019/100 Visa) who has to get permission to leave the UK and/or permission to arrive in Australia and to activate the visa?  I understand if wanting to travel to Australia within the next 3 months you have to complete a form online, but I doubt we will be moving this year now because of the virus, so travel restrictions will be pose a problem if Australia wont be letting people in.

The excitement of our move is very much in our minds but at the same time very worried about actually getting there!!

 

 

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@Aussiebird as a citizen and a partner visa holder neither of you need an exemption to travel to Australia. 

https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/coming-australia


Applied from London - 6th September 2019 

Medical uploaded 17th Jan

AFP clearance uploaded 27th Jan 

UK police clearance uploaded 23rd March 

Australian husband - together 10 years, married 7.
2 children with dual citizenship.

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