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KaeDarcy

189 visa - English Exams / options for boosting points

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Hi there

I'm currently at my wit's end trying to figure out the best way to remain in Aus in these trying times, and would really appreciate some advice.

Long story short, I was visiting family here when Covid-19 struck, and as a result, I haven't been able to return to China where I was working as an English teacher. I don't have any family left in the UK anymore, so settling in Australia sooner than I'd originally planned seems to now be the best option. Fortunately I've been granted a bridging visa to tide me over, but submitting an EOI for the 189 visa seems impossible at the moment due to the points system. 

I'm a PGCE qualified secondary school teacher, but I don't have 3 years worth of experience, so my points stand at 60. The whole reason for me going overseas to teach was to gain the necessary experience which I couldn't get in the UK with all the Drama Teacher job shortages. At 33 years old, I'm also too old now to apply for any working holiday visa type. It seems that the only way to gain those extra 15 points, is through proof of 'Superior English', which would give me 20 points.

Is it fairly common for native English speakers to have to sit the IELTS/Cambridge C1, etc? The immigration guidelines state that I'd need to score 200 points on all 4 parts of the C1 Advanced test (might as well take the C2 test then?), which sounds to me like a 90-100% pass mark? Has anyone here been through the process of taking any of the English exams?

Have I perhaps overlooked any other options to boost my points?

From reading other posts on the forum, I also get the feeling that 80 points in all honesty, still wouldn't be enough to get a visa invitation?

My only other visa option at this point is to tag onto my mom's aged parent application, which she's yet to submit, but time is ticking. I'm not sure how comfortable I feel about waiting up to 30 years to be granted permanent residency, not to mention how this might affect living, travel and working conditions going forwards. I'll be almost retired myself by then! 🤣

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If you are not dependent on your mum, you can’t be on her application. 

Most (basically all) native speakers need to do IELTS or equivalent to get the necessary points. You should be looking at state sponsorship for 190 or 491 visas rather than a 189 at this points level. 


____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. 

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5 hours ago, KaeDarcy said:

Long story short, I was visiting family here when Covid-19 struck, and as a result, I haven't been able to return to China where I was working as an English teacher. I don't have any family left in the UK anymore, so settling in Australia sooner than I'd originally planned seems to now be the best option. Fortunately I've been granted a bridging visa to tide me over, but submitting an EOI for the 189 visa seems impossible at the moment due to the points system. 

Irom reading other posts on the forum, I also get the feeling that 80 points in all honesty, still wouldn't be enough to get a visa invitation?

My only other visa option at this point is to tag onto my mom's aged parent application, which she's yet to submit, but time is ticking.

Yes, with 80 points, you don't stand any chance of being invited, and an application for a 189 would be a complete waste of money.   

Your best bet is state sponsorship, which (depending on which states are sponsoring) might mean living in another state from your mum for several years, but at least you'll be in Australia.  Considering the visa requirements are getting harder and harder every year, I'd say it's your only hope.  It would be foolhardy to delay in hopes of getting more experience to earn more points, because you might find your occupation wasn't even on the list by that time and the door would be firmly shut. 

As Paul says, most people do take the English test to gain more points. The surprising thing is that many native speakers (including teachers of English!) score poorly on it, so don't assume you'd get 20 points. 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Yes, with 80 points, you don't stand any chance of being invited, and an application for a 189 would be a complete waste of money.   

Your best bet is state sponsorship, which (depending on which states are sponsoring) might mean living in another state from your mum for several years, but at least you'll be in Australia.  Considering the visa requirements are getting harder and harder every year, I'd say it's your only hope.  It would be foolhardy to delay in hopes of getting more experience to earn more points, because you might find your occupation wasn't even on the list by that time and the door would be firmly shut. 

As Paul says, most people do take the English test to gain more points. The surprising thing is that many native speakers (including teachers of English!) score poorly on it, so don't assume you'd get 20 points. 

When my son took the IELTS test even though I had no need to take it, I thought I would give it a go on a practice one line, . I am a native English speaker, kid myself I am fairly articulate, and failed. My son sailed through his real one, but had been sensible and practiced. I realised I was reading more into the questions than was necessary and passed my next one, did it again to reassure myself I was competent in my native language.

So practice lots on line to have the best chance of passing.

Have you ever tried it Marisa, it’s an interesting experiment.

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1 hour ago, ramot said:

When my son took the IELTS test even though I had no need to take it, I thought I would give it a go on a practice one line, . I am a native English speaker, kid myself I am fairly articulate, and failed. My son sailed through his real one, but had been sensible and practiced. I realised I was reading more into the questions than was necessary and passed my next one, did it again to reassure myself I was competent in my native language.

So practice lots on line to have the best chance of passing.

Have you ever tried it Marisa, it’s an interesting experiment.

No, I've never tried it, but have read so many complaints on here about it, from people who are obviously articulate and fluent.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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As mentioned, 80 points will be of no use as although the technical minimum is 65, nobody will get an invite for a 189 on less than 90 points. 
 

However, all is not lost. I would strongly recommend a consultation with a good registered migration agent as there are likely other options 

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Thank you for all the comments and advice.

11 hours ago, paulhand said:

If you are not dependent on your mum, you can’t be on her application.  

I've been debating this heavily with family. Thanks for clarifying!

Gosh... It's a wonder why immigration don't change the minimum points to a more honest 90+ for the sake of transparency! Will have to look into and talk over the 190 and 491 options instead.

2 hours ago, VERYSTORMY said:

However, all is not lost. I would strongly recommend a consultation with a good registered migration agent as there are likely other options 

Yup, is does feel rather hopeless, and the current climate/timing of everything going on around the world really doesn't help. You're right though, consultation might just be the best way forward from here.

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You can boost your points by 5 if you successfully write a NAATI test. If you can confidently speak another language, then gaining the extra 5 points should be a breeze. Booking for NAATI requires you to be inshore and the waiting queues are rather long from what I recall reading, good luck!

On 16/05/2020 at 02:55, KaeDarcy said:

Thank you for all the comments and advice.

I've been debating this heavily with family. Thanks for clarifying!

Gosh... It's a wonder why immigration don't change the minimum points to a more honest 90+ for the sake of transparency! Will have to look into and talk over the 190 and 491 options instead.

Yup, is does feel rather hopeless, and the current climate/timing of everything going on around the world really doesn't help. You're right though, consultation might just be the best way forward from here.

 

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