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Drazic

Perth or Sydney?

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18 hours ago, MacGyver said:

If Perth was on the East Coast it would be very difficult to beat.

It's called Brisbane!¬†ūüėĄ

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2 hours ago, Wanderer Returns said:

 

I live in South Brisbane and it takes and hour to drive to the Gold Coast, and an hour and half to drive to the Sunshine Coast. It's not as close to the beach as Pert, but I'd hardly say that's a long way. The beaches on Stradbroke Island actually take longer to get to than the Goldie because of the Ferry, and then the bus ride on the other side.

We live 2 min by car from the beach, we can walk it in 10. 

We rented in Como for a year when we first came, only 20min by car to Freo but we didn't go to the beach nearly as much. Living really close is like a different life.

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2 hours ago, Wanderer Returns said:

It's called Brisbane!¬†ūüėĄ

No, it's better where it is. Less humid, better climate and less crowded.

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48 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

We live 2 min by car from the beach, we can walk it in 10. 

We rented in Como for a year when we first came, only 20min by car to Freo but we didn't go to the beach nearly as much. Living really close is like a different life.

Nice. Can't really argue with that!

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54 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

No, it's better where it is. Less humid, better climate and less crowded.

I'll grant you it's less crowded but there's little difference in climate. Brissie has a bit more rain and mostly in summer, whereas Perth gets most of it's rain during winter. Summers are pretty muggy here but from April to October it's glorious. I've only been to Perth in summer and it's always been as dry as a bone, which I've never found very appealing. 

https://weather-averages.co.uk/compare-climate/brisbane%2C-australia/perth%2C-australia

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6 hours ago, Wanderer Returns said:

 I don't think Sydney is excessively humid, apart from 2-3 months over the summer, although it seems to be getting hotter everywhere these days!

3 months is a quarter of the year, and if you can’t cope with humidity, it’s a long time to be miserable. 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, Wanderer Returns said:

I'll grant you it's less crowded but there's little difference in climate. Brissie has a bit more rain and mostly in summer, whereas Perth gets most of it's rain during winter. Summers are pretty muggy here but from April to October it's glorious. I've only been to Perth in summer and it's always been as dry as a bone, which I've never found very appealing. 

https://weather-averages.co.uk/compare-climate/brisbane%2C-australia/perth%2C-australia

Temperature may not be much different but humidity is very different indeed

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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31 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Temperature may not be much different but humidity is very different indeed

I could move around outside in Perth's dry heat of 30C and still feel comfortable whereas in Sydney (and I dare say Brisbane), I found it difficult on a really humid day of 25C.

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17 hours ago, Marisawright said:

3 months is a quarter of the year, and if you can’t cope with humidity, it’s a long time to be miserable. 

3 months of the year in Sydney when you might want to run the air-con to stay comfortable, as opposed to 3 months in Melbourne when you need to relay on some form of auxiliary heating. It's horses for courses. Either is an improvement on 7-8 months in the UK when you need to run the central heating¬†ūüôā

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1 hour ago, Wanderer Returns said:

3 months of the year in Sydney when you might want to run the air-con to stay comfortable, as opposed to 3 months in Melbourne when you need to relay on some form of auxiliary heating. It's horses for courses. Either is an improvement on 7-8 months in the UK when you need to run the central heating¬†ūüôā

The difference is that for those 3 months, I can cope with an air conditioner when I'm indoors, but what do I do when I want to go outdoors?  Nothing, because there's only so much clothing I can strip off - so I'm trapped.

Whereas in Melbourne, I'm  comfortable indoors most of the winter - I don't own a heater, but I do switch on the reverse cycle air conditioner occasionally - and I can rug up if it's cool outside.   Melbourne does have a few stinking hot days in summer, but even on those days, it's always fresh and cool in the morning till about 10, so I can still get out and enjoy the day.  Total freedom.

It all comes down to the fact that different people react differently to heat and humidity.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)
On 15/05/2020 at 02:50, Paul1Perth said:

How long is it since you were here? Perth has changed a lot and there is a lot more choice in Perth now. Freo is nice but small.

Moved back last year.

I always found Perth CBD a bit sterile and lifeless. I used to work in the BHP tower so, you'd think you were in the midst of it but, there wasn't a great deal going on. There were a few bars and restaurants in that area but not much atmos in the places; and they're extortionate for not that great quality.

I liked Freo, it was a bit different. You can walk the place in no time but there are bars and eateries galore, all within spitting distance. That cappuccino strip has a distinctly Euro feel to it now. Perth CBD is glass and metal and, whilst it looks clean, nice and new, its a bit clinical and unwelcoming. Just my tuppence.

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10 hours ago, s713 said:

Moved back last year.

I always found Perth CBD a bit sterile and lifeless. I used to work in the BHP tower so, you'd think you were in the midst of it but, there wasn't a great deal going on. There were a few bars and restaurants in that area but not much atmos in the places; and they're extortionate for not that great quality.

I liked Freo, it was a bit different. You can walk the place in no time but there are bars and eateries galore, all within spitting distance. That cappuccino strip has a distinctly Euro feel to it now. Perth CBD is glass and metal and, whilst it looks clean, nice and new, its a bit clinical and unwelcoming. Just my tuppence.

This is my take entirely, and you've pretty much summed it up that Freemantle has more atmosphere than the city itself. Having lived 20 years in London the I think the OP @Drazic would find it quite an adjustment, and should definitely consider a visit there first before committing.

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11 hours ago, s713 said:

Moved back last year.

I always found Perth CBD a bit sterile and lifeless. I used to work in the BHP tower so, you'd think you were in the midst of it but, there wasn't a great deal going on. There were a few bars and restaurants in that area but not much atmos in the places; and they're extortionate for not that great quality.

I liked Freo, it was a bit different. You can walk the place in no time but there are bars and eateries galore, all within spitting distance. That cappuccino strip has a distinctly Euro feel to it now. Perth CBD is glass and metal and, whilst it looks clean, nice and new, its a bit clinical and unwelcoming. Just my tuppence.

They've opened up some of the laneways now and have a few smaller bars with a lot more atmosphere and customers. One's called the spaniard that we've been to a few times. Good tapas and sangria for a decent price. There are about 4 bars in that one laneway, near the Belgium beer cafe, which is extortionate I reckon, but always seem popular. 

I love the rooftop bars, The Aviary my favourite, handy for the train too.

I like Freo too, nice feel to it but a lot of the really good Italian restaurants seem to have closed.

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5 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

I love the rooftop bars, The Aviary my favourite, handy for the train too.

Bob's Bar was the rooftop bar near our work. I remember getting stung for a round in there, $54 for 3 pints of IPA. Funnily enough, that's my main recollection of the place.

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1 hour ago, s713 said:

Bob's Bar was the rooftop bar near our work. I remember getting stung for a round in there, $54 for 3 pints of IPA. Funnily enough, that's my main recollection of the place.

That must have been some special sort of beer. Most I've paid in there is $12 and I thought that was steep. Good bar though, the Asian restaurant in the middle floor is excellent and  surprisingly, good value.

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3 hours ago, s713 said:

Bob's Bar was the rooftop bar near our work. I remember getting stung for a round in there, $54 for 3 pints of IPA. Funnily enough, that's my main recollection of the place.

I like Bobs bar .. thankfully never paid that much for a round of drinks there though 


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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My Australian life started in Perth on 3rd November, 1978, and I loved it but I could not get a job. I might have still been living there now If I'd got a job. I went over to Adelaide on the Greyhound after a month, decided to go back to Perth after a week there, then changed my mind again and went on to Sydney on an Ansett Pioneer bus.

I went back to Perth in December, 2017 for the first time in 38 years and stayed there for seven weeks, mostly in South Perth (but with a few days in Margaret River). I liked it and went back again three month later. This time I stayed in Applecross, Northbridge and South Perth again, with a week driving down to Albany.

That second trip was more of a reality check because I realiized that if I moved there (which I was thinking about) I wasn't sure if I could go through the "emigration" process again.  I've got family and friends in Sydney but nobody bar one friend in Perth. She has invited me to stay which is tempting although the border is closed, seemingly forever more?!

I still like it in Perth and if I was starting off I'd pick it over Sydney. I don't understand many of the criticisms of Perth. Too isolated? But it's five hours closer to Europe and with a direct flight to LHR. Who needs to go to "the Eastern States" on a regular basis? I rarely go to Brisbane, Melbourne or Adelaide. 

Homes seem to be cheaper than in Sydney and compared to Sydney's peak hour (which is seven days a week, twelve hours a day) driving is relatively pleasant. I did the same things I did in Sydney - finding cafes and pubs to go to turn into my "locals". English football is often on at an earlier time than in Sydney and I could get all the games in the casino if the pubs had closed at midnight.

I guess it is all subjective though?

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17 hours ago, MARYROSE02 said:

My Australian life started in Perth on 3rd November, 1978, and I loved it but I could not get a job. I might have still been living there now If I'd got a job. I went over to Adelaide on the Greyhound after a month, decided to go back to Perth after a week there, then changed my mind again and went on to Sydney on an Ansett Pioneer bus.

I went back to Perth in December, 2017 for the first time in 38 years and stayed there for seven weeks, mostly in South Perth (but with a few days in Margaret River). I liked it and went back again three month later. This time I stayed in Applecross, Northbridge and South Perth again, with a week driving down to Albany.

That second trip was more of a reality check because I realiized that if I moved there (which I was thinking about) I wasn't sure if I could go through the "emigration" process again.  I've got family and friends in Sydney but nobody bar one friend in Perth. She has invited me to stay which is tempting although the border is closed, seemingly forever more?!

I still like it in Perth and if I was starting off I'd pick it over Sydney. I don't understand many of the criticisms of Perth. Too isolated? But it's five hours closer to Europe and with a direct flight to LHR. Who needs to go to "the Eastern States" on a regular basis? I rarely go to Brisbane, Melbourne or Adelaide. 

Homes seem to be cheaper than in Sydney and compared to Sydney's peak hour (which is seven days a week, twelve hours a day) driving is relatively pleasant. I did the same things I did in Sydney - finding cafes and pubs to go to turn into my "locals". English football is often on at an earlier time than in Sydney and I could get all the games in the casino if the pubs had closed at midnight.

I guess it is all subjective though?

Interesting times when you came Maryrose. A lot tougher those days, travelling by bus, not knowing what you were going to. Would be hard to move now I reckon if your friends are in Sydney. I guess you could make some money if you moved though.

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To be fair, I got the isolation thing. The main reason for me was that there are only a finite amount of things to do locally, then you're faced with a massive journey to do something else. We lived in Joondalup, there's very little to do there. There's beaches and Hillarys or travel east to Swan Valley and the hills, or head South (I had to stop going to Hillarys, I literally couldn't stick the place in the end). We tried further north a couple of times, as far as Monkey Mia, but most of the small towns aren't really worth the drive, it's just like driving for an hour then getting to another Yanchep, but usually not as good. You may as well just stay in the real Yanchep and save the massive drive. Moore River is nice, I rarely ventured further north than that. We just ended up in a cycle of holidays and days out to the same places over and over, I hit the wall after about 5 years.

Over East, I imagine you don't face the same constraints when it comes to travel options. Obvs, the tyranny of distance still applies.

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13 hours ago, s713 said:

To be fair, I got the isolation thing. The main reason for me was that there are only a finite amount of things to do locally, then you're faced with a massive journey to do something else. We lived in Joondalup, there's very little to do there. There's beaches and Hillarys or travel east to Swan Valley and the hills, or head South (I had to stop going to Hillarys, I literally couldn't stick the place in the end). We tried further north a couple of times, as far as Monkey Mia, but most of the small towns aren't really worth the drive, it's just like driving for an hour then getting to another Yanchep, but usually not as good. You may as well just stay in the real Yanchep and save the massive drive. Moore River is nice, I rarely ventured further north than that. We just ended up in a cycle of holidays and days out to the same places over and over, I hit the wall after about 5 years.

Over East, I imagine you don't face the same constraints when it comes to travel options. Obvs, the tyranny of distance still applies.

What do you do now you're back in the UK? I was glad of my yearly trip to Spain or Portugal, go anywhere in the UK on a decent sunny day, when you get one and 10,000 people have the same idea. There's nowhere to park and when you do find a space it costs you £10 an hour to park.

If you had anything like Hillary's in a UK seaside town, I can't think of seeing anything close anywhere, you wouldn't be able to get near it on a nice day, you would have to park the equivalent of Malaga and walk.

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22 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

What do you do now you're back in the UK? I was glad of my yearly trip to Spain or Portugal, go anywhere in the UK on a decent sunny day, when you get one and 10,000 people have the same idea. There's nowhere to park and when you do find a space it costs you £10 an hour to park.

If your leisure time revolves around outdoor sports then I can understand that, but not everyone is into that.   Some people like visiting historic houses and gardens, or going for rambles in the countryside, or bird-watching.  For those people, the UK offers far more choice within a short distance, especially if you don't mind walking in light rain (which many ramblers don't).  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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7 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

What do you do now you're back in the UK? I was glad of my yearly trip to Spain or Portugal, go anywhere in the UK on a decent sunny day, when you get one and 10,000 people have the same idea. There's nowhere to park and when you do find a space it costs you £10 an hour to park.

If you had anything like Hillary's in a UK seaside town, I can't think of seeing anything close anywhere, you wouldn't be able to get near it on a nice day, you would have to park the equivalent of Malaga and walk.

It's absolutely nothing like that. In the the hour and half it used to take me to drive to Mandurah (yawn) the options I have here are breathtaking. I don't save my money for a yearly trip to Spain, we have a weekend (or two) away every month, like we did in Australia. The weather isn't usually a factor, it's just as much a factor over there as half the time it's too hot to do anything. I've never paid £10 to park. Hillary's is OK for a bit, then when you realise it's 1 of about 3 options you've got for the rest of the your life, and you've been 800 times, the OK-ness wears off.

I appreciate that people might like that stuff, not for me though.

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On 21/05/2020 at 15:59, s713 said:

It's absolutely nothing like that. In the the hour and half it used to take me to drive to Mandurah (yawn) the options I have here are breathtaking. I don't save my money for a yearly trip to Spain, we have a weekend (or two) away every month, like we did in Australia. The weather isn't usually a factor, it's just as much a factor over there as half the time it's too hot to do anything. I've never paid £10 to park. Hillary's is OK for a bit, then when you realise it's 1 of about 3 options you've got for the rest of the your life, and you've been 800 times, the OK-ness wears off.

I appreciate that people might like that stuff, not for me though.

I only like Hilary's as somewhere to take visitors and even then I try to get my hubby to do it instead.

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I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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2 hours ago, ali said:

I've neverÔĽŅ paid ¬£ÔĽŅ10 to park

We're currently living in the Derbyshire Dales, we can easily spend ten pounds on parking if we visit different places in one day, and we have a resident's parking permit too (very limited hours for free parking)

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Left UK 1990 / WA for 28 years / UK / returning Australia as soon as the CV issue allows !

 

 

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18 hours ago, AliQ said:

We're currently living in the Derbyshire Dales, we can easily spend ten pounds on parking if we visit different places in one day, and we have a resident's parking permit too (very limited hours for free parking)

Not sure what went wrong with the quote ... it was s713 who mentioned the parking - not me


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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