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Sarahelle

Planning a big move but...

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Hey all,

Soo we're looking into moving home (for many reasons) which is proving to be problematic because of course, my husband is Australian.  Kids are not a problem as they have British citizenship through me.  

We absolutely cannot do the cash savings route - we have no house to sell, no wealthy parents and it would take us years and years to save that amount.  We also have absolutely no chance of going the Ancestry Visa route.  Hubby's grandparents are born and bred Australian and only great grandparents were of British decent so that's a closed door too.

The only way we can do it is for me to move back with our youngest daughter and find a job, set up home etc. This is not ideal as I am not the high earner by any stretch

So.  We have made a good start on savings which is at least one good thing to come out of the whole Covid-19 thing as I was able to access my pension early.  It seemed like a good idea as I would lose it if I left anyway.  

My question is, has anyone had to do this?  Being the British one but not the high earner?  I'm eager to hear any stories as I'm finding the whole prospect extremely daunting to say the least!

Any advice would be very gratefully received 🙂 

Thank you. 

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9 minutes ago, Sarahelle said:

Hey all,

Soo we're looking into moving home (for many reasons) which is proving to be problematic because of course, my husband is Australian.  Kids are not a problem as they have British citizenship through me.  

We absolutely cannot do the cash savings route - we have no house to sell, no wealthy parents and it would take us years and years to save that amount.  We also have absolutely no chance of going the Ancestry Visa route.  Hubby's grandparents are born and bred Australian and only great grandparents were of British decent so that's a closed door too.

The only way we can do it is for me to move back with our youngest daughter and find a job, set up home etc. This is not ideal as I am not the high earner by any stretch

So.  We have made a good start on savings which is at least one good thing to come out of the whole Covid-19 thing as I was able to access my pension early.  It seemed like a good idea as I would lose it if I left anyway.  

My question is, has anyone had to do this?  Being the British one but not the high earner?  I'm eager to hear any stories as I'm finding the whole prospect extremely daunting to say the least!

Any advice would be very gratefully received 🙂 

Thank you. 

 

I can't give you any advice but would it be possible for you and your daughter to stay with relatives/parents until you get settled?

Good luck, I know you have been wanting to move back to the UK for some time.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Sarahelle said:

at least one good thing to come out of the whole Covid-19 thing as I was able to access my pension early.  It seemed like a good idea as I would lose it if I left anyway.  

That's not true, actually, if by "pension" you mean "superannuation".   You can access your superannuation from anywhere in the world, if you are a permanent resident of Australia.  It's the state government pension that you can't get. 

It's a very tough situation.   Have you thought about moving to the republic of Ireland?   The requirements are not as onerous and if you're moving back because of homesickness, it means you're close enough to visit family, even if not on their doorstep.  You could see it as a stepping stone to ultimately move to the UK.  

Edited by Marisawright
  • Like 1

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Marisawright thanks for your reply - yes, I meant superannuation.  Moving to Ireland could in fact be an option.  I'll look into it, thank you 🙂 

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Posted (edited)
51 minutes ago, Sarahelle said:

Marisawright thanks for your reply - yes, I meant superannuation.  Moving to Ireland could in fact be an option.  I'll look into it, thank you 🙂 

It used to be a very common option for people who couldn't afford a partner visa to the UK.   As an EU citizen, you have the right to enter Ireland with your spouse and family, no need for a visa.   Due to Ireland's historical connection with the UK, Ireland has even fewer restrictions than the other EU countries.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/dec/30/brexit-10-things-uk-citizens-can-still-do-in-eu-after-31-january

(to be clear, I do mean Ireland not Northern Ireland)

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

It used to be a very common option for people who couldn't afford a partner visa to the UK.   As an EU citizen, you have the right to enter Ireland with your spouse and family, no need for a visa.   Due to Ireland's historical connection with the UK, Ireland has even fewer restrictions than the other EU countries.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/dec/30/brexit-10-things-uk-citizens-can-still-do-in-eu-after-31-january

(to be clear, I do mean Ireland not Northern Ireland)

Britain isn't in the EU.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Parley said:

Britain isn't in the EU.

If you read the link, you'll see that many of the rules don't change till December 2020.  And Ireland has special concessions for Brits on top of that.

Edited by Marisawright
  • Like 1

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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