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davlap

Weeds or plants ?

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Trying to start a veggie patch. Things start to grow and then die, just when you think they are going to flourish. Had a few chilli tree harvests, and basil, which have been good and edible.  Lettuce, tomatoes and carrots have produced very small pickings. But not much else.

Live in Brisbane area, so climate not extreme.

The only things to grow well recently are shown in photos. I think they are weeds. Nothing planted that I know of, but if things die I tend to spread the pot soil on part on the patch in case there are dormant roots/seeds. Resurrected a couple of things this way. The shiny leaf plant looks similar to plants we did get free from council plants. 

 

IMG_20200409_115519.jpg

IMG_20200409_115454.jpg

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Posted (edited)

I found growing fruit and vegetables in Sydney very challenging.    SO many bugs of various kinds. Being European, my MIL had planted her garden with figs, oranges, peaches etc but she very rarely got any fruit - if the fruit flies didn't get them, the bats and birds did.  Every time I tried to grow tomatoes, they got decimated before we got to eat many.  Same with lettuces. The only thing that survived well was rocket, oregano and mint.   

The weather was also a challenge, because the sun can be too intense at times.  

I could imagine all of that being similar in Brissie.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, davlap said:

Trying to start a veggie patch. Things start to grow and then die, just when you think they are going to flourish. Had a few chilli tree harvests, and basil, which have been good and edible.  Lettuce, tomatoes and carrots have produced very small pickings. But not much else.

Live in Brisbane area, so climate not extreme.

The only things to grow well recently are shown in photos. I think they are weeds. Nothing planted that I know of, but if things die I tend to spread the pot soil on part on the patch in case there are dormant roots/seeds. Resurrected a couple of things this way. The shiny leaf plant looks similar to plants we did get free from council plants. 

 

IMG_20200409_115519.jpg

IMG_20200409_115454.jpg

G’day mate, the first pic is one of the weeds of the solanum family (nightshades and potatoes) and the second is a healthy looking passionfruit. Train it over a strong type trestle, so the fruit can hang down slightly in 12 months, or so. 
If you live in the  “salad bowl belt”, you should be ok with almost any veggies. 
Cheers, Bobj.

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Cheers BobJ

Wife said she thought it was a nightshade, will pull the bugger out !

Glad that is a passionfruit. Neighbour has one coming over our fence. Tried to cultivate a couple of times, no joy. Like I mentioned, I throw old pots on the patch, so looks like I go a success from that . The one coming over the fence bore a bout 20 fruits (yellow variety) this year (none last year). Got about half a dozen full size and made a compot from flesh. Rest of them were too small. This one is by the other side and would be great to train it over  the fence.

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

I found growing fruit and vegetables in Sydney very challenging.    SO many bugs of various kinds. Being European, my MIL had planted her garden with figs, oranges, peaches etc but she very rarely got any fruit - if the fruit flies didn't get them, the bats and birds did.  Every time I tried to grow tomatoes, they got decimated before we got to eat many.  Same with lettuces. The only thing that survived well was rocket, oregano and mint.   

The weather was also a challenge, because the sun can be too intense at times.  

I could imagine all of that being similar in Brissie.

Hi Marisawright, sounds like you have same success as us. Some things grow, but not to a size for eating. We don't really see any bugs, see a few caterpillars (lots of butterflies around at the moment). But something eats the plants, especially lettuce and cabbages.

BobJ wrote: if you live in the  “salad bowl belt”, you should be ok with almost any veggies.  - I wish !! My Mum could grow anything and everything, all I grow is impatience ! I was so pleased that our game playing bedroom dweller man child got interested. But after a few weeks he got fed up with poor results and has given up.

There is a bat colony nearby. Neighbour has a mango tree and it had literally hundreds this year. We picked a few kilos of overhangs and fresh off the floor. They were really tasty. Bats descended of course and nibbled or ate a lot of them.

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I'm in Melbourne now and am astonished at how well things grow here.  You'd think not because of Melbourne's reputation for miserable weather - but because it's cooler, the bugs aren't as rampant, there's less mould, and of course the rain is spread more evenly over the year, which is better for the plants.

I live near Carlton which used to be a huge Italian and Greek neighbourhood, so the gardens (even the front gardens) are full of trees -   quinces, apricots, olives, persimmons, lemons, oranges, grapefruit, clementines, mulberry.  Nowadays the people who own those houses don't seem to appreciate the trees as they don't look after them, but they fruit well anyway.   I have friends who give away bucketloads of apricots every year.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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We recently downloaded a phone app called “Picture This” it is expensive for the premium service I think, it’s $29.99 usd  but you can use it without. You take a photo with the app of the plant and it tells you what it is and all the info on it.  If you subscribe it will also help you if you have a dying plant and advise how to revive it.


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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I think I’m an expert gardener. No one could grow as many weeds as me 😂😂

Using the app one thing I did find on the land in a really random place not anywhere near the house was this plant which the app says is a purple bush bean. Now it doesn’t make it clear whether it’s edible or not. 
6510652E-54C5-4838-B7AE-DAE84A82EBFF.jpeg

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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17 minutes ago, The Pom Queen said:

We recently downloaded a phone app called “Picture This” it is expensive for the premium service I think, it’s $29.99 usd  but you can use it without. You take a photo with the app of the plant and it tells you what it is and all the info on it.  If you subscribe it will also help you if you have a dying plant and advise how to revive it.

Thanks Pom Queen

Wasn't going to bother, wanted CC details even for 7 day trial, but swiped through and it allows three free Ids (not sure if per day / use etc).

Identified both plants from the photos. Well impressed, only took a couple of seconds

Will look around for free apps

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, The Pom Queen said:

I think I’m an expert gardener. No one could grow as many weeds as me 😂😂

Using the app one thing I did find on the land in a really random place not anywhere near the house was this plant which the app says is a purple bush bean. Now it doesn’t make it clear whether it’s edible or not. 
 

Google is your friend - purple french/runner beans you can eat. But check it is the right plant of course, only did a quick search, but if the beans grow they will be fairly obvious

https://www.succeedheirlooms.com.au/heirloom-vegetable-seed/heirloom-bean-seeds/bean-royal-burgundy-seeds.html

Edited by davlap

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Oh and I forgot we found this, I’m not sure if it’s a wild cucumber or one left over from the sons veg garden. I’m not sure if it’s edible either

503B5E8C-F9E3-48BE-B751-7133607B15EA.jpeg


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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1 minute ago, davlap said:

I saw that but didn’t know if it was the same as these have never had beans on them well not what I’ve seen, maybe because they have only had ground coverage and that one fence pole.


If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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1 hour ago, The Pom Queen said:

Oh and I forgot we found this, I’m not sure if it’s a wild cucumber or one left over from the sons veg garden. I’m not sure if it’s edible either

503B5E8C-F9E3-48BE-B751-7133607B15EA.jpeg

Wild cucumber and, not edible. Neither is the purple bush bean.

Cheers, Bobj.

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I'm in Melbourne now and am astonished at how well things grow here.  You'd think not because of Melbourne's reputation for miserable weather - but because it's cooler, the bugs aren't as rampant, there's less mould, and of course the rain is spread more evenly over the year, which is better for the plants.

I live near Carlton which used to be a huge Italian and Greek neighbourhood, so the gardens (even the front gardens) are full of trees -   quinces, apricots, olives, persimmons, lemons, oranges, grapefruit, clementines, mulberry.  Nowadays the people who own those houses don't seem to appreciate the trees as they don't look after them, but they fruit well anyway.   I have friends who give away bucketloads of apricots every year.

I grow carrots, leeks, broccoli, green beans and salad things in the communal garden which is a bit like an allotment.  At home I grow tomatoes and strawberries.  I'd never had a decent strawberry in all the years I've lived in Australia 'til I grew my own.  The ones from the shops are tasteless and watery - same with a lot of the tomatoes.  My home grown strawberries are full of flavour again the same with the tomatoes.  We give away buckets of lemons and swap them for loads of apples with our neighbour.  I've got my eyes on a good harvest of wild blackberries which I've spotted on my walks.  They will be ready to pick in a couple of weeks.  Again, on one of my walks I came across a pear tree in the middle of nowhere.   There must have been a house in the close vicinity at one time as there is also a lilac tree and an old apple tree.

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11 hours ago, Toots said:

At home I grow tomatoes and strawberries.  I'd never had a decent strawberry in all the years I've lived in Australia 'til I grew my own.  The ones from the shops are tasteless and watery - same with a lot of the tomatoes.  My home grown strawberries are full of flavour again the same with the tomatoes. 

Strawberries are a partial positive. Lots of green foliage on one plant cluster. Had three fruits, 2 of them about a size of a pea ! Tried to separate the other plant cluster, but killed all but one of the transplants.

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@davlap, the secret is to recognise that you're living in a "subtropical" part of the world.    The kind of plants you'd grow in the UK in summer, you have to grow in winter and spring.  If you try to grow them in summer they'll die.  In summer, you can grow tropical plants. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 09/04/2020 at 18:21, Bobj said:

Wild cucumber and, not edible. Neither is the purple bush bean.

Cheers, Bobj.

Thank you @Bobj it’s typical the only thing we manage to grow well and it’s weeds haha 😂 

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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19 hours ago, Marisawright said:

@davlap, the secret is to recognise that you're living in a "subtropical" part of the world.    The kind of plants you'd grow in the UK in summer, you have to grow in winter and spring.  If you try to grow them in summer they'll die.  In summer, you can grow tropical plants. 

So what’s easy to grow, for someone who can’t always get outside if they are wired to machines, and something I could plant now but see rewards soon. 🤔

I wouldn’t mind but we kept talking of planting fruit trees when we moved here and then said no because they take too long to grow. They would have had 4 years of growth by now lol. 
‘My son got a really good set up going, he bought a $700 canvas greenhouse had all seedlings had bathtubs filled with chilli plants, cucumbers, tomatoes, herbs etc, then we had some really bad storms come through they ripped the greenhouse from the stakes and sent it down in to the paddock along with his shelving and it really upset him. After a month he bit the bullet and set it all up again, got lettuce growing, radish then another storm came through took down a tree which landed on his greenhouse and bathtubs that was it, he has never bothered again. 

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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