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Lucie

Can we get a visa??

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Hello 

me and my husband are desperate to move to Austria with our children however we do not have a job that is on the skilled list. Is there any other way that we could move out there eg any other visa’s that we could apply for. We have been looking at training to become a job that is on the list, do you have to be working in that role for a certain amount of time before apply for a visa?? 
 

 

 

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22 minutes ago, Lucie said:

Hello 

me and my husband are desperate to move to Austria with our children however we do not have a job that is on the skilled list. Is there any other way that we could move out there eg any other visa’s that we could apply for. We have been looking at training to become a job that is on the list, do you have to be working in that role for a certain amount of time before apply for a visa?? 
 

 

 

Is your husband is New Zealand citizen or not!!

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34 minutes ago, KevinC said:

Is your husband is New Zealand citizen or not!!

No British 

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1 hour ago, Lucie said:

me and my husband are desperate to move to Australia with our children however we do not have a job that is on the skilled list. Is there any other way that we could move out there

The sad fact is that most people can't migrate to Australia.  If you're not on the skilled lists, you can't migrate', end of story.  

Your only option is for one of you to retrain in one of those occupations.  But be warned:  you need to get the qualifications, AND then you need to get the experience.  So depending on what occupation you pick, you'll be up for several years of study and then working in your new job. 

Meanwhile, the list of occupations gets shorter and shorter every year - so you might find that by the time you've spent all that money on retraining, the occupation isn't even on the list any more and it was all a waste of time.  And it's very hard to pick which occupations are "safe" and which aren't.  For instance, you'd think nursing would be a safe bet but they're talking about taking that off the list. And some trades are off the list already.

On top of all that, even once you have the right occupation and the right experience, you're not out of the woods yet.  When you apply for a visa, it's a competition. You are allocated a point score based on various factors.  More qualifications and experience gets higher points, but then you lose points for age.   Only the people with the highest points get picked - so even if you have retrained and got the experience, there's still no guarantee you'll get in.

To give you an idea how bad that can get:  you're eligible to apply for a visa if you can score 65 points or over, but this year, only applicants with over 90 points are actually getting one.

So the message is, if you really want to migrate, then you'll need to retrain, but choose an occupation that you'll want to work in even if you have to stay in the UK, because there is a good chance that's what will happen.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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15 hours ago, Marisawright said:

The sad fact is that most people can't migrate to Australia.  If you're not on the skilled lists, you can't migrate', end of story.  

Your only option is for one of you to retrain in one of those occupations.  But be warned:  you need to get the qualifications, AND then you need to get the experience.  So depending on what occupation you pick, you'll be up for several years of study and then working in your new job. 

Meanwhile, the list of occupations gets shorter and shorter every year - so you might find that by the time you've spent all that money on retraining, the occupation isn't even on the list any more and it was all a waste of time.  And it's very hard to pick which occupations are "safe" and which aren't.  For instance, you'd think nursing would be a safe bet but they're talking about taking that off the list. And some trades are off the list already.

On top of all that, even once you have the right occupation and the right experience, you're not out of the woods yet.  When you apply for a visa, it's a competition. You are allocated a point score based on various factors.  More qualifications and experience gets higher points, but then you lose points for age.   Only the people with the highest points get picked - so even if you have retrained and got the experience, there's still no guarantee you'll get in.

To give you an idea how bad that can get:  you're eligible to apply for a visa if you can score 65 points or over, but this year, only applicants with over 90 points are actually getting one.

So the message is, if you really want to migrate, then you'll need to retrain, but choose an occupation that you'll want to work in even if you have to stay in the UK, because there is a good chance that's what will happen.

Thank you for your reply, that’s really useful to know. It’s really disappointing I didn’t realise it was so hard. 

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4 hours ago, Lucie said:

Thank you for your reply, that’s really useful to know. It’s really disappointing I didn’t realise it was so hard. 

Few people do. 40 years ago it was as simple as just asking to be let in. Even 10 years ago it was likely you'd be allowed in of you wanted it.

Now it's tough, and it's been getting tougher each year with no respite in sight

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8 hours ago, Lucie said:

Thank you for your reply, that’s really useful to know. It’s really disappointing I didn’t realise it was so hard. 

I think most Brits have aunts or uncles or family friends who migrated to Australia years ago, and tend to think it's still like that - "Australia is a young country crying out for new migrants".  

It's not like that any more. Australia is like any other country now - unemployment is a problem and a lot of Australians are starting to think like the Brits ("immigrants are taking our jobs"), so the government is quite anti-immigration.  So we're like any other country and we only accept people whose skills are in short supply.

Shows like Home and Away can give people the wrong idea. The kids on Home and Away would never be able to live where they do - houses in the real "Summer Bay" are only affordable for multi-millionaires.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Posted (edited)
On 01/03/2020 at 05:58, Lucie said:

Hello 

me and my husband are desperate to move to Austria with our children however we do not have a job that is on the skilled list. Is there any other way that we could move out there eg any other visa’s that we could apply for. We have been looking at training to become a job that is on the list, do you have to be working in that role for a certain amount of time before apply for a visa?? 

Are you on the right forum? 

😉

Serious question though. Are you really that desperate to move here that would go back to school for years and afterward gain even more years of work experience back home? I mean, I get your sentiment, but it's not as if the UK is some third-world dictatorship who persecutes it's citizens. It has one of the highest qualities of life in the world (as does my home nation) and is also an immigrant magnet. I'll bet you have a great life in the UK, so you would really need to think about this before throwing your lives into complete chaos. Just my two cents.

Edited by Canada2Australia
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5 minutes ago, Canada2Australia said:

Are you on the right forum? 

😉

I missed that.  Well spotted!  😄

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On 02/03/2020 at 07:51, Marisawright said:

I think most Brits have aunts or uncles or family friends who migrated to Australia years ago, and tend to think it's still like that - "Australia is a young country crying out for new migrants".  

It's not like that any more. Australia is like any other country now - unemployment is a problem and a lot of Australians are starting to think like the Brits ("immigrants are taking our jobs"), so the government is quite anti-immigration.  So we're like any other country and we only accept people whose skills are in short supply.

Shows like Home and Away can give people the wrong idea. The kids on Home and Away would never be able to live where they do - houses in the real "Summer Bay" are only affordable for multi-millionaires.  

Thinking about it when we were planning to apply for the Australian PR in 2011, my agents told me that the process is changing and to get our applications in as soon as possible. This was before the EOI was put in place. Thanks to Go Matilda we were able to get through within 6 months of starting the process. It was much more simpler then. Things have gotten much harder and I see people struggling to qualify even if they have their jobs on the list. Immigration for sure has become much more tighter. 

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3 minutes ago, Toots said:

I missed that.  Well spotted!  😄

That was the first thing I noticed, but again just thought it would have been a typo from the op. 


IELTS 07/22 R 7.5 W 8.5 S 8.0 L 8.5 O 8.0| Positive Assessment on 10/12 | SA SS Online 10/19 | SA Docs Recvd. 11/02 | SA SS Approved 11/18 | 176 lodged 11/30 | PCC and Medicals requested 12/05 | Meds Finalzed 09/01 | PCC met 31/01 | Visa Granted 02/01

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1 minute ago, path2aus said:

That was the first thing I noticed, but again just thought it would have been a typo from the op. 

It reminded me of a friend of mine whose parents came to Australia from the Ukraine after WW ll.  They thought that they were going to Austria and couldn't understand why they were put on a large ship.  Nobody could speak English and after the chaos of everyone getting on board they realised that they were heading for Australia.  They were newly married and only 20 years old.  

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3 hours ago, Toots said:

It reminded me of a friend of mine whose parents came to Australia from the Ukraine after WW ll.  They thought that they were going to Austria and couldn't understand why they were put on a large ship.  Nobody could speak English and after the chaos of everyone getting on board they realised that they were heading for Australia.  They were newly married and only 20 years old.  

I dont suppose they ever wrote about their experience? Sounds like a fantastic story I'd love to read about


:evilface_frowning_s

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9 minutes ago, MacGyver said:

I dont suppose they ever wrote about their experience? Sounds like a fantastic story I'd love to read about

No they never wrote anything down sadly.  They had a very hard life to start with in Australia.  He worked as a labourer on the railways in NSW and she cooked for all the workers.  When they had their first child she continued to work and when the child was toddling, he was tied to a kitchen table leg to keep him out of mischief.  😮

Eventually they bought a house, had 3 more children (who were all successful) and lived a contented life in Sydney.  He ended up as a train driver.  My friend is the youngest of the 4.  Her Mum and Dad never really spoke about their life in the Ukraine or how hard it was for them when they arrived in Australia until they were really quite elderly.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Toots said:

No they never wrote anything down sadly.  They had a very hard life to start with in Australia.  He worked as a labourer on the railways in NSW and she cooked for all the workers.  When they had their first child she continued to work and when the child was toddling, he was tied to a kitchen table leg to keep him out of mischief.  😮

Eventually they bought a house, had 3 more children (who were all successful) and lived a contented life in Sydney.  He ended up as a train driver.  My friend is the youngest of the 4.  Her Mum and Dad never really spoke about their life in the Ukraine or how hard it was for them when they arrived in Australia until they were really quite elderly.

It's too bad there are so few Ukrainians here. It's the cultural background I was raised and brought up in (am a proud Ukrainian-Canadian 🙂 ) We have the largest Ukrainian population outside of Ukraine and Russia. It's something that I miss dearly and is sometimes hard to live without for me personally, not hearing the language or eating the food on a regular basis.

Edited by Canada2Australia
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27 minutes ago, Canada2Australia said:

It's too bad there are so few Ukrainians here. It's the cultural background I was raised and brought up in (am a proud Ukrainian-Canadian 🙂 ) We have the largest Ukrainian population outside of Ukraine and Russia. It's something that I miss dearly and is sometimes hard to live without for me personally, not hearing the language or eating the food on a regular basis.

The family I know belong to the Ukrainian Association in Sydney and they also have a golf club.

https://www.hromada.org.au/

https://ukigolfsydney.com/

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9 hours ago, Canada2Australia said:

Are you on the right forum? 

😉

Serious question though. Are you really that desperate to move here that would go back to school for years and afterward gain even more years of work experience back home? I mean, I get your sentiment, but it's not as if the UK is some third-world dictatorship who persecutes it's citizens. It has one of the highest qualities of life in the world (as does my home nation) and is also an immigrant magnet. I'll bet you have a great life in the UK, so you would really need to think about this before throwing your lives into complete chaos. Just my two cents.

The uk isn’t a bad place to live but it’s always been missing something. Now I have 2 children I want them to be happy and a better quality of life. I’ve always wanted to move to oz after visiting 10 years ago and I feel like if we don’t at least try we are going to regret it. 

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1 hour ago, Lucie said:

The uk isn’t a bad place to live but it’s always been missing something. Now I have 2 children I want them to be happy and a better quality of life

Life is not better in Australia, it’s just different. When you’re on holiday you only see all the fun bits and not how people really live their lives. 

Some people prefer Australia but you’ll also find large numbers of people who tried it and decided the UK suited them better. Everyone is different. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 02/03/2020 at 01:27, Ausvisitor said:

Few people do. 40 years ago it was as simple as just asking to be let in. Even 10 years ago it was likely you'd be allowed in of you wanted it.

Now it's tough, and it's been getting tougher each year with no respite in sight

We came in 92 and the points system was running then. It wasn't any easier than now to get in. There was an Australian Embassy in Manchester where you could go and apply. There were 2 queues, one for holiday visas, one for people applying to emigrate. The emigration queue was the longest. 

The first process was they gave you a small form to work out how many points you had. If you ran through that and you had less than 80 (I think at the time) they just told you not to bother applying as you would be wasting your money. There were people openly crying in the embassy library after realising they couldn't make the points. I could understand why too.

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On 02/03/2020 at 04:27, Ausvisitor said:

Few people do. 40 years ago it was as simple as just asking to be let in. Even 10 years ago it was likely you'd be allowed in of you wanted it.

Now it's tough, and it's been getting tougher each year with no respite in sight

Sorry. Don't agree. I've been here for 40 years and only qualified to stay under the 1980 amnesty. If it was a case of just asking to be let in 40 years, there wouldn't have been hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants already here and wanting to stay, would there?

And 10 years ago there was a rigorous migration selection system. I've been on these forums for much longer than that and I saw plenty of qualified, hopeful people being knocked back for migration 10 years ago.

Not denying it's tough now but it's always been tough for people who don't qualify under the current rules of the day.

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On 03/03/2020 at 13:58, Toots said:

The family I know belong to the Ukrainian Association in Sydney and they also have a golf club.

https://www.hromada.org.au/

https://ukigolfsydney.com/

Right on. I think if I were really wanting to become active the thr Ukie community again, I may have to move to one of the big 6 cities, where the only real Ukie communities are found in Australia, as small as they are. Something to think about.........

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On 03/03/2020 at 17:44, Lucie said:

The uk isn’t a bad place to live but it’s always been missing something. Now I have 2 children I want them to be happy and a better quality of life. I’ve always wanted to move to oz after visiting 10 years ago and I feel like if we don’t at least try we are going to regret it. 

I have lived in 3 countries and had children in the UK and Australia. Australia isn't much better than the UK in terms of day to day living. The weather may be warmer, but in fact I find it too hot and humid and I really only enjoy the Spring and Autumn heat. There is a  big drug problem in Australia, especially with Ice and if you think that living in a decent area will combat this, you are  mistaken. We live in a very high social economic area in Sydney and drugs and booze are a very real issue here - nangs, weed, ice - you name it, the teens can get their hands on it easily. Luckily, my one child is very anti social and stays at home all the time so doesn't get peer pressured, my youngest is sports mad so we think he will avoid it all - but our middle child is a people pleaser and wants everyone to be happy all the time, even at her own expense so we are keeping a very, very close on her and her friendship circle. Australia is not utopia, it is a country just like the UK and has it's issues. 

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