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Mark Jones

Urostomy supplies In Oz Compared with UK

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We have just started the visa application process for parental contributory subclass 143. My wife has urostomy supplies delivered free here in the UK via the NHS. Does anyone have experience of urostomy supplies in Australia, specifically NSW Sydney area. Cost? Prescription charges? Methods of reducing prescription charges? Names of suppliers or companies etc? Any noticeable changes to types of urostomy equipment?

We welcome any advice from people in a similar position or have been through the UK NHS to Australian system process.

Thank you

Mark & Diane Jones

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thanks for the links. Nothing we can do about the length of time it takes to get this visa. If you know of any short cuts please advise.

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7 minutes ago, Mark Jones said:

Thanks for the links. Nothing we can do about the length of time it takes to get this visa. If you know of any short cuts please advise.

There are temporary parent visas which you can get in the meantime (more fees of course!).   

There's also the option of moving to Australian on a tourist visa and then applying for the permanent visa onshore. You then get a bridging visa which allows you to stay in Australia while you wait for the parent visa to be granted.   It's an option that people are using increasingly because of the long wait times, but it's vital to look into it carefully as there are snags.  

The problem is that while you're on a bridging visa, you're in limbo - not legally a resident of any country (you've lost residency in the UK but you're classed as a temporary visitor in Australia).  That means you'll lose access to the NHS (you can't pop back to the UK on holiday and expect to get treatment or prescriptions).  As a British citizen, you can access Medicare (the NHS equivalent) in Australia - however extras like the stoma appliance scheme wouldn't be available to you.    

Also, because you're only a visitor, you're classed as a foreign investor if you want to buy a home, and will be charged extra fees.   On a $500,000 home, your fees would amount to about $45,000.  You are not allowed to leave Australia while on the basic bridging visa (BVA) and will need to apply for another visa (BVB - more fees!) if you wish to travel outside Australia for holidays. You may or may not be allowed to work on the bridging visa.

Finally, there's the fact that when the visa finally gets processed, there will be a medical.  That's something you'll always have to face:  however if you've spent the 6 to 8 years waiting in the comfort of your own home in the UK and you fail the medical, you just stay there.   If you move yourself lock,stock and barrel to Australia and then fail the medical, you're faced with the prospect of having to move back to England and re-establish your whole life again.  So you also have to consider your health outlook.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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If your wife is eligible for the Stoma Appliance Scheme, you pay a membership fee of $50 and then you can purchase your products from one of their suppliers. Here is the price list. https://www1.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/AB1C0973EEA98E14CA257BF0001E01C4/$File/sas-schedule-1-november-2019-full.pdf
 

I use Independence Australia for my stoma needs https://store.independenceaustralia.com 

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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11 hours ago, Marisawright said:

There are temporary parent visas which you can get in the meantime (more fees of course!).   

There's also the option of moving to Australian on a tourist visa and then applying for the permanent visa onshore. You then get a bridging visa which allows you to stay in Australia while you wait for the parent visa to be granted.   It's an option that people are using increasingly because of the long wait times, but it's vital to look into it carefully as there are snags.  

The problem is that while you're on a bridging visa, you're in limbo - not legally a resident of any country (you've lost residency in the UK but you're classed as a temporary visitor in Australia).  That means you'll lose access to the NHS (you can't pop back to the UK on holiday and expect to get treatment or prescriptions).  As a British citizen, you can access Medicare (the NHS equivalent) in Australia - however extras like the stoma appliance scheme wouldn't be available to you.    

Also, because you're only a visitor, you're classed as a foreign investor if you want to buy a home, and will be charged extra fees.   On a $500,000 home, your fees would amount to about $45,000.  You are not allowed to leave Australia while on the basic bridging visa (BVA) and will need to apply for another visa (BVB - more fees!) if you wish to travel outside Australia for holidays. You may or may not be allowed to work on the bridging visa.

Finally, there's the fact that when the visa finally gets processed, there will be a medical.  That's something you'll always have to face:  however if you've spent the 6 to 8 years waiting in the comfort of your own home in the UK and you fail the medical, you just stay there.   If you move yourself lock,stock and barrel to Australia and then fail the medical, you're faced with the prospect of having to move back to England and re-establish your whole life again.  So you also have to consider your health outlook.

Thanks again for the information. Our agent has confirmed the current waiting time is 3.5 to 4 years. Not so bad, it will pass quickly and we do visit once a year so we will be more positive now every time we have to leave.

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25 minutes ago, Mark Jones said:

Thanks again for the information. Our agent has confirmed the current waiting time is 3.5 to 4 years

I think your agent is out of touch, but time will tell.   


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Mark Jones said:

Thanks again for the information. Our agent has confirmed the current waiting time is 3.5 to 4 years. Not so bad, it will pass quickly and we do visit once a year so we will be more positive now every time we have to leave.

If your agents told you that you should be concerned as it’s not correct. You may want to ask them again. The wait time for people applying now is thought to be in excess of 6 years but likely nearer to 8.  It sounds like you haven’t submitted the application yet, honestly think of the wait time as 8 years and be surprised if it’s any sooner. 

Edited by Tulip1

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Thanks Tulip1, its very interesting being new to the forum and new to applying for our visas. As we said in our earlier post we can do nothing about the time involved. We have no reason to mistrust or be concerned about the agent acting for us. If its 6 years up to 8 then so be it but we have testimonials saying otherwise. Its not an issue for us really. Time is on our side. In fact it may negate the issue of looking for work as I could retire in 8 years and just enjoy Oz as a giant retirement home. Thanks again though its nice to see people are willing to post advice for newby's.

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3 hours ago, Mark Jones said:

Thanks Tulip1, its very interesting being new to the forum and new to applying for our visas. As we said in our earlier post we can do nothing about the time involved. We have no reason to mistrust or be concerned about the agent acting for us. If its 6 years up to 8 then so be it but we have testimonials saying otherwise. Its not an issue for us really. Time is on our side. In fact it may negate the issue of looking for work as I could retire in 8 years and just enjoy Oz as a giant retirement home. Thanks again though its nice to see people are willing to post advice for newby's.

A retirement out there sounds a good plan. I’m sure you know but testimonials of anything are after the event has happened. People who got their visas even a year or so ago were waiting the timeframe you’ve mentioned and people a year or two before that got theirs even quicker. Therefore of course their testimonials will say their wait time was say 3 to 4 years because it was.  People who’s queue date was late 2015 have only just got their visas and the queue length went crazy after they joined it. This coupled with the quota of visas being issued each year reducing made wait times go off the scale.  They give out 6000 parent visas a year and there is currently approximately 50 thousand in the queue waiting. It’s sad that your agent is still promising a quicker turn around than is possible by several years. That said, you have the best outlook saying it will happen when it does and to go out to retire without the worry of finding work sounds good. I wish you the best. 

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