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Hi, 

Me and my partner are looking to move to Australia. We have 2 children also. Any information and help would be much appreciated. 

Thanks 

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You can start here: https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-finder for some initial ideas and an overview of how the system works.

if you have specific questions, the folks here will do our best to answer them. 
 

 

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____________________________________________________________________

Paul Hand

Registered Migration Agent, MARN 1801974

SunCoast Migration Ltd

All comments are general in nature and do not constitute legal or migration advice. Comments may not be applicable or appropriate to your specific situation. 

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Welcome to the forum.   The good news is that you're in the right place to get help on your journey.  The bad news is that Australia is very, very fussy about whom they accept.

First, one of you must work in an occupation that's on a short list of eligible occupations.  If not, you can't migrate.  On top of that, the list specifies what qualifications and experience you must have - if you don't, you can't migrate.  So that is the first thing you need to check.  

For the most straightforward permanent visa, the 189, you're also judged on a point score.  You only need 65 points to apply, but the 189 is a competition, and the people with the highest points get picked. Right now, there are many applicants with very high scores, and no one with less than 85 points stands a chance of getting a visa. 

If you can't score enough points, then there are the 190 or 491 visas you can apply for, which require you to live in a particular state or area for your first few years.  If you want to move to a particular city, that may not suit you.

The last visa on the list is the employer-sponsored visa. This may sound like a good deal because the employer will pay some of your moving costs and you'll have a job to go to, BUT the catch is that it's only a temporary for 2 to 4 years, and you go home at the end.  There is the possibility of applying for a permanent visa at the end, but it's only a possibility and the rules are changing all the time, making it harder and harder to get.  For a family, it's not recommended due to the stress and high cost of moving temporarily.

If all that sounds complicated, that's because it is.  Try the visa finder Paul has linked to, and if it looks as though you might qualify, Paul (and other reputable migration agents) offer an initial consultation free of charge to get you started.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Welcome to the forum.   The good news is that you're in the right place to get help on your journey.  The bad news is that Australia is very, very fussy about whom they accept.
First, one of you must work in an occupation that's on a short list of eligible occupations.  If not, you can't migrate.  On top of that, the list specifies what qualifications and experience you must have - if you don't, you can't migrate.  So that is the first thing you need to check.  
For the most straightforward permanent visa, the 189, you're also judged on a point score.  You only need 65 points to apply, but the 189 is a competition, and the people with the highest points get picked. Right now, there are many applicants with very high scores, and no one with less than 85 points stands a chance of getting a visa. 
If you can't score enough points, then there are the 190 or 491 visas you can apply for, which require you to live in a particular state or area for your first few years.  If you want to move to a particular city, that may not suit you.
The last visa on the list is the employer-sponsored visa. This may sound like a good deal because the employer will pay some of your moving costs and you'll have a job to go to, BUT the catch is that it's only a temporary for 2 to 4 years, and you go home at the end.  There is the possibility of applying for a permanent visa at the end, but it's only a possibility and the rules are changing all the time, making it harder and harder to get.  For a family, it's not recommended due to the stress and high cost of moving temporarily.
If all that sounds complicated, that's because it is.  Try the visa finder Paul has linked to, and if it looks as though you might qualify, Paul (and other reputable migration agents) offer an initial consultation free of charge to get you started.


Marisa I wish you would make an attempt to post more accurate information

A temporary visa is not a one off. It is possible to apply for another when it expires

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5 hours ago, Mcguinnessp1968 said:

 


Marisa I wish you would make an attempt to post more accurate information

A temporary visa is not a one off. It is possible to apply for another when it expires

 

But it’s still temporary. You can’t keep renewing forevermore 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Sorry, i was on my phone.

Yes, it is possible to renew a temporary visa, but all that gets you is another temporary visa.   And you can't keep renewing it again and again, it's not allowed.   

Besides, renewing doesn't improve your chances of getting PR - in fact, probably the reverse, because the longer you're on a temp visa, the more occupations are removed from the lists and the more requirements for permanent visas are going up, so your chances of ever getting permanency are likely to get worse, not better. 

Ultimately if you can't get a permanent visa, you'll have to go home, and the longer you've been away, the harder it will be to settle back in the UK.   

It may  not be an issue for singles or couples with no ties, but harder for families to live in that situation.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I think that depends on the family.  Many are willing to take the opportunity to live overseas for a few years even if it doesn't suit everyone.

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21 minutes ago, MaggieMay24 said:

I think that depends on the family.  Many are willing to take the opportunity to live overseas for a few years even if it doesn't suit everyone.

Absolutely, and I think it’s a great opportunity to have an adventure if the family treats it as such. 

The OP asked specifically about moving to Australia which I took to mean permanently not just for the short term 

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 17/01/2020 at 07:34, Aussiewannabie said:

Hi, 

Me and my partner are looking to move to Australia. We have 2 children also. Any information and help would be much appreciated. 

Thanks 

Hi check out the occupations list and see if you can match your job, some jobs may come under a few category's so if your unsure definately check with an agent. We moved with 2 young children over 13 years ago on a skilled visa and have no regrets yet, migrating isnt easy but it sure can be worth it.

 Lots of luck with everything

  Cal x

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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8 hours ago, calNgary said:

Hi check out the occupations list and see if you can match your job, some jobs may come under a few category's so if your unsure definately check with an agent. We moved with 2 young children over 13 years ago on a skilled visa and have no regrets yet, migrating isnt easy but it sure can be worth it.

 Lots of luck with everything

  Cal x

Thank you soo much for the advice.  We really want to do it know wed be happier and healthier its just making it possible now 😬🙈

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25 minutes ago, Aussiewannabie said:

Thank you soo much for the advice.  We really want to do it know wed be happier and healthier its just making it possible now 😬🙈

Why do you think you’d be happier and healthier?


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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The outdoor lifestyle will be much better as a family, walks, sports eating fresher and healthier foods... The laid back atmosphere will be amazing, were im from everyone loves drama and to just leave behind the bad and start afresh. 

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24 minutes ago, Aussiewannabie said:

The outdoor lifestyle will be much better as a family, walks, sports eating fresher and healthier foods... The laid back atmosphere will be amazing, were im from everyone loves drama and to just leave behind the bad and start afresh. 

Remember that the grass is never really greener. Just a different type. Food is actually not cheap, and not really healthier. It is generally cheaper to buy fast food, if you're so inclined.

The atmosphere is not always laid-back. I work in as a highly strung environment here as I did in most of my UK jobs.

If you're not generally an active person there, then you may not be one here.

Now on to the positives.

The climate. Depending on where you move to, you're almost guaranteed to have more sun than you've ever had in a country like the UK.

However, this can also be a bad thing. I'm in Brissie, and today it was 31, but felt like 39 due to the humidity.

Evidently, some Poms find it hard to make friends with the locals.

There are gorgeous beaches just over an hour's drive away.

Lovely bushwalking and forest trails.

Pay can be better for some occupations.

New cars are much cheaper than in the UK, eg, VW Golf for $23k

HTH

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IELTS : 13/08/16: W8 S8 L9 R9. F2w ID Check/Rcvd: 15/08/16, 23/08/16 HCPC/SoR CoGS sent: 23/08/16. Skills Ax sent/Rcvd/granted: 30/08/16, 12/09/16, 10/10/16. AHPRA sent/AIP : 05/09/16, 28/12/16. EoI/invited: 20/1/17, 01/02/17. 189 submitted: 06/02/17, Caseworker: 23/02/17. Medicals: 31/03/17. Grant: 12/04/17. Child 101 submitted: 09/06/17. Granted: 06/07/17. Landed: 01/09/17.

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4 hours ago, Aussiewannabie said:

The outdoor lifestyle will be much better as a family, walks, sports eating fresher and healthier foods... The laid back atmosphere will be amazing, were im from everyone loves drama and to just leave behind the bad and start afresh. 

From my experience. If your not outdoor now, moving country won't make you. 

If you can't get fresh healthy food now, well...

Laid back? You are aware Australians work some of the longest hours in the developed world and generally have less annual leave? 

If you are running from something, in my experience, it tends to not just catch you, but put you in a worse position. 

But this is all surplus. You need to qualify for a visa. What are your occupations and qualifications and experience? 

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5 hours ago, Aussiewannabie said:

The outdoor lifestyle will be much better as a family, walks, sports eating fresher and healthier foods... The laid back atmosphere will be amazing, were im from everyone loves drama and to just leave behind the bad and start afresh. 

Do you really think that Australia is going to offer you this???? 

I've been in Australia for nearly a month (on holiday this time but have lived here for over 30 years) and my time outdoors had been more severely limited this last month than for the past 8 years in UK! I'm restricted when I can walk because some days get too hot, we've had the worst air quality in the world because of bush fires and having to exercise in a P2 mask hasn't been fantastic (and advice has been dont exercise at all outside). I've been bitten several times by mozzies and a March fly had a go at me yesterday. I've been almost caught outside by one of the biggest thunderstorms I've ever seen (but we weren't one of the 11000 insurance claims made here as a result). And my Great Aussie Wave has been much practiced (I dislike flies trying to crawl into every head orifice while I'm walking) 

Fresh fruit and veg - get  plenty of that in UK, quality just as  good, variety greater and generally cheaper than it is here. Meat - well, I have yet to meet anyone better than our village butcher in UK, especially for sausages.

Laid back??? Probably in some rural towns but city folk are highly strung - never seen so many tail gaters in my life and road courtesy - nah. Add to that longer working hours and only 4 weeks rec leave a year. I really think laid back is a thing of Australia's past now that pretty much every family needs to be two income just to cover  the mortgage. 

If you're in it for adventure then go for it. If you've got a skill that's in demand, and a nice savings buffer behind you then have fun! 

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6 hours ago, Aussiewannabie said:

The outdoor lifestyle will be much better as a family, walks, sports eating fresher and healthier foods... The laid back atmosphere will be amazing, were im from everyone loves drama and to just leave behind the bad and start afresh. 

Mate! Love that attitude. Been in Australia for over 55 years and still having an outdoors lifestyle at age 79...Do what you and your partner feel you should do. Be positive in your outlook. And to hell with the negative comments. 😉 I can honestly say that I’ve had a fabulous life here.

And, enjoy your lives together

Cheers, Bobj.

PS. In all my time in Australia, I have only lived in cities for about 2 years, My time has been spent in The Kimberlies, northern New England and now in the Whitsunday/ Mackay Region.

 

 

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Life is what u make it were ever u live . I been here over 30 years , visited or lived in all the states . Queensland my favourite, been lucky to live in some beautiful places , had some health issues an can say Medicare is wonderful , been homeless livving in my car an can say in Queensland it was easy , the weather the support available like food banks , free cooking on beach bbq’s , amenities all made this part of my life easier .

We never no what life has in store for us . I say do it we only have now do wat makes u happy give it a go , if u don’t settle there’s a hole world out there I been lucky seen most of it but I think I’ll call Australia home . Good luck to you and yours .

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Just a further thought , some have said Australia is boreing . But how many live in the cities in uk ? suburbia the choice of many . The cities here offer a vibrant life style . Brisbane with its day and nite markets , eat street foods from all over the world , excellent transport the citie cats up and down the river , Southbank, swimming in the city , shopping in queen st buy a Rolex watch to a fridge magnet at the cheap shop .we have china town , restaurants , clubs and pubs , museums art gallery’s , it’s all out there same as any place you have to go and find it , it won’t come to you, an the people are multicultural here same as most cities , join a club get to no them ,friends have to be found say the first hello . 

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You could be negative about any country really.  I also think some people should never migrate  ............  the stay at home, family and friends living round the corner types will find it very hard to settle in a totally new country and many of them will always be yearning to return to the country they love.   You only need to read some of the "I want to move back to the UK" posts to understand that.

I grow most of my veggies and swap and share with friends.  Don't eat meat so have no idea what it costs.  OH buys his own meat but even he has cut down on his meat eating.  Apart from the odd 40C day when we lived in Sydney the weather hasn't bothered me - though I dislike humidity.  I am outdoors for most of the day here - always something to do.  I have been content for the nearly 40 years I've lived here.  I have an inherited heart problem and the care I receive for that is excellent.  

Very much enjoying retirement now  .............  never bored or lonely.  Life is still an adventure.  😃

 

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Mate! Love that attitude. Been in Australia for over 55 years and still having an outdoors lifestyle at age 79...Do what you and your partner feel you should do. Be positive in your outlook. And to hell with the negative comments.  I can honestly say that I’ve had a fabulous life here.
And, enjoy your lives together
Cheers, Bobj.
PS. In all my time in Australia, I have only lived in cities for about 2 years, My time has been spent in The Kimberlies, northern New England and now in the Whitsunday/ Mackay Region.
 
 



Well said Bob

There are some real misery guts on here, it’s almost like they see themselves as some sort of amateur border security

To the OP check if you can get a visa first. If you can then go for it, it’s well worth the adventure
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I often read (valid) opinions that if you dont eat healthy in the UK, or spend much time outdoors, you therefore wont in Australia. While I partially agree with this, something that is often overlooked is how the climate impacts on your desire to do these things, rather than an ability to do them. You have beautiful countryside for long walks in the UK and healthy foods are abundant in supermarkets. The difference I found though (particularly living in Scotland) is you sometimes dont want to eat healthy or go outside. When its cold and miserable your body demands inside warmth, lots of carbs, hearty meals. In parts of australia, the heat can make you desire different things and you want to eat lighter meals wtih smaller portions, you want to get out into the sunshine etc.

For me thats the difference, not the ability to do those things, but rather the natural tendency to do them given the respective climates. My Australian diet is far, far healthier than my Scottish diet. My Australian lifestyle is far healthier than my Scottish lifestyle. I'm the same person, I want to be healthy in both places, I just find it comes more naturally in Australia.

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Another life is what you make it poster. I’ve lived in 5 different countries, and have called the Sunshine Coast home for 16 years having retired here from Brunei,Now that really is a hot, humid country, where amazingly I played badminton in a non air conditioned large hall and tennis admittedly late afternoon, and my husband played golf, children even played sport at school, so I find the moaning about how you can’t exercise here very odd. The dreadful smoke haze down south from the fires is obviously awful at the moment, and restrictive.

Yes it’s hot and humid at the moment on the Sunshine Coast, so people walk more in the early morning and late afternoon, sport still continues. I don’t know if I am more or less active than retired UK friends, but the weather hardly ever stops me apart from obvious bad conditions. I  Balance that against almost 9 months of almost perfect weather here. 

There are posters who are glass half full people and others the opposite. No country suits everyone, and it must be awful to be as unhappy as some posters are.

I say live life to the full wherever you are, and don’t knock a country that you have left,  I have lived in a couple of really difficult ones.if I really wanted to moan I could,  but that was then and this is now, so move on is my policy.

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45 minutes ago, ramot said:

There are posters who are glass half full people and others the opposite. No country suits everyone, and it must be awful to be as unhappy as some posters are.

Absolutely. Personally, I like life in Australia but when I see someone saying "we want to move to Australia because everything is better and we'll be happier and healthier", I think it's irresponsible not to point out that there are minuses as well as pluses.  If they get their visa and arrive expecting a paradise, they'll be disappointed and those first disappointments can poison their whole experience.  Whereas if they've thought through the pros and cons first, they've got a much better chance of success.

When someone says, "go for it, it's an adventure" to someone with a wife and kids, they're saying, "Yeah, why not, it will only cost you about . If you don't like it, you can always move back, what's another £30k?"   For some people, that would be their life savings.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I think she said ''they would be happier and healthier'', unless i've totally missed the' everything better' bit. Either way, you can migrate and be happy and healthier and quite a few of us on here can vouch for that.   As a new comer i would be well put off posting with all the questions and negatives fired at me. 

To be fair its like someone saying they are getting married so we post links and lecture them on divorce rates, just in case.. 

Cal x

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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Not to be pedantic but before you get married most people as a general rule know who they will be marrying having spent a considerable amount of time with them. Comparing marriage and migrating; I’d say migrating is more like an arranged marriage, it might look good on paper but the reality can be somewhat different. In which case quoting divorce rates and difficulties that may be encountered by not knowing the person and therefore comparatively speaking, having never lived in Australia before, is perfectly appropriate IMO. 
 

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Due to escalating bills and budgetary cuts in the NHS, unfortunately, the light at the end of the tunnel has had to be switched off.

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