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simmo

The UK and Climate Change

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2 hours ago, simmo said:

When do people generally charge them up then?

Overnight.  Off peak.

I mainly charge mine during the day when the sun is shining if I can but that is not typical either.


Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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2 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

Yes it could but how do you propose laying all that copper cable to get the power to where it's needed. Along with all the extra tech to convert DC to AC, get the voltage and frequency in sync and match it up to Asia or whoevers system. As well as providing back up battery storage for when there's problems. Do you think Aus should pay too.

Solar is fine for localised areas. Asia have plenty of sun themselves and could have quite large towns and villages off the grid and self sufficient. Check out Broken Hill in Aus for a good example.

 

https://www.energymatters.com.au/renewable-news/worlds-largest-solar-farm-nt-singapore/

Why would Australia pay?  You know that people pay for electricity in Asia don’t you?

And how are we going to get all that coal to Asia.  First we have to dig huge mines, refine it, somehow transport it to a port and load it into ships, unload it at the other end and transport it.  Build massive power stations with furnaces and manage the emissions.  How is all this possible?  You see if it didn’t already exist it would seem a near impossible logistical nightmare.  Hopefully there are people with more imagination than people wedded to 19th Century solutions to 21st Century problems.

Edited by Gbye grey sky
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2 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

There's not enough people with EV's to make it a problem at the moment.

Best to make plans for when there are though, eh?


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1 hour ago, ssiri said:

 

No, it wasn’t, that one. it was just a policy to get very old cars off the road, not related diesel.

The only benefit of diesel is that it lasts longer, but its just as polluting if not worse than petrol. So fewer refills.

Not strictly true.  Diesel produces less CO2 than standard unleaded petrol however that has been offset by other issues such as particulates in urban environments.  The figures were fiddled by VW (and others) on this hence the deserved opprobrium heaped upon them and the massive fines.  Unfortunately nobody senior has wound up serving prison time (as per usual).

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I don't think diesels are suitable for urban stop/start driving.  I think they have their place, just not in towns.

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3 hours ago, simmo said:

When do people generally charge them up then?

4 hours ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Australia could generate enough solar energy to provide power to the whole of Asia.  That would dwarf profits from selling coal.

All it needs is for Australians to get out of their fossil-fuel mentality and embrace a cleaner less-polluted future.

Not within in 5 years as is demanded by ER mob 

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1 hour ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Not strictly true.  Diesel produces less CO2 than standard unleaded petrol however that has been offset by other issues such as particulates in urban environments.  The figures were fiddled by VW (and others) on this hence the deserved opprobrium heaped upon them and the massive fines.  Unfortunately nobody senior has wound up serving prison time (as per usual).

Which are the  other companies besides VW ? 

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1 hour ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Overnight.  Off peak.

I mainly charge mine during the day when the sun is shining if I can but that is not typical either.

That’s ok if you are not using car in daytime, no good if you are travelling from sydney to Brisbane 

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32 minutes ago, Rallyman said:

Which are the  other companies besides VW ? 

If you are genuinely interested research the subject.  VW were just the most blatant at it but they were certainly not alone.

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33 minutes ago, Rallyman said:

Which are the  other companies besides VW ? 

Volvo, Renault, Jeep, Hyundai, Citroën and Fiat, to name a few.

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https://www.energymatters.com.au/renewable-news/worlds-largest-solar-farm-nt-singapore/
Why would Australia pay?  You know that people pay for electricity in Asia don’t you?
And how are we going to get all that coal to Asia.  First we have to dig huge mines, refine it, somehow transport it to a port and load it into ships, unload it at the other end and transport it.  Build massive power stations with furnaces and manage the emissions.  How is all this possible?  You see if it didn’t already exist it would seem a near impossible logistical nightmare.  Hopefully there are people with more imagination than people wedded to 19th Century solutions to 21st Century problems.



Clearly time for a second industrial revolution

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17 hours ago, Gbye grey sky said:

https://www.energymatters.com.au/renewable-news/worlds-largest-solar-farm-nt-singapore/

Why would Australia pay?  You know that people pay for electricity in Asia don’t you?

And how are we going to get all that coal to Asia.  First we have to dig huge mines, refine it, somehow transport it to a port and load it into ships, unload it at the other end and transport it.  Build massive power stations with furnaces and manage the emissions.  How is all this possible?  You see if it didn’t already exist it would seem a near impossible logistical nightmare.  Hopefully there are people with more imagination than people wedded to 19th Century solutions to 21st Century problems.

The thing is though that the supply chain, power stations already exist and Aus companies are making huge profits, paying large amounts of tax here and keeping the lifestyle as we know and enjoy stable.

The situations changing though but making it sound simple that Aus should just put heaps of solar farms in, supply Asia with power and then somehow make a profit is farsical at the moment.

It's very easy to say we should do this or that and everyone is saying it should be done faster. In reality it's a big balancing act to maintain, jobs, the price of electricity, tax income, keeping the economy stable.

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17 hours ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Best to make plans for when there are though, eh?

I'm sure the electricity companies are mate. Another balancing act though. They only have so much money to go around, they have to spend heaps on maintenance on their existing networks and the extra investment needed for the power needed has to be carefully managed.

As people transiton the infrastructure will have to change. It's a  long way off yet though.

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It's very easy to say we should do this or that and everyone is saying it should be done faster. In reality it's a big balancing act to maintain, jobs, the price of electricity, tax income, keeping the economy stable.



Yes, a transition by its very nature implies it is a big balancing act, and they need to get to doing that transition planning right now, bot bickering over it and kicking the can down the road.

The longer they procrastinate, and avoid doing the job, there will be no transition. The issues they are trying to ‘balance’ into a twill just be catapulted into a transition without any plan or thought, which means they would be on the back foot, incapable of safeguarding existing jobs, unable to provide new jobs, forget controlled tax and options to keep the economy ticking over into a stable transition. Everyone will be dragged into instability and insecurity if they fail to pave the way to achieve the balance, when transitioning. That’s what happens when elected leaders fail to lead.
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4 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

I'm sure the electricity companies are mate. Another balancing act though. They only have so much money to go around, they have to spend heaps on maintenance on their existing networks and the extra investment needed for the power needed has to be carefully managed.

As people transiton the infrastructure will have to change. It's a  long way off yet though.

Was listening to radio today and comments on the infrastructure is in a  shocking state of repair and we are in real danger of grid crashing it’s a real mess, and being realistic about costs on how much people will pay   Only a certain amount to go round 

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5 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

I'm sure the electricity companies are mate. Another balancing act though. They only have so much money to go around, they have to spend heaps on maintenance on their existing networks and the extra investment needed for the power needed has to be carefully managed.

As people transiton the infrastructure will have to change. It's a  long way off yet though.

If the data is correct and the science is accepted then we don’t have the time to simply wait for change to happen over decades.  Of course if you think that the data is wrong and that the scientists are conspiring against the global oil, banking and other poor conglomerates then why bother changing anything at all.

I agree that change will take a long long time if everyone simply throws their arms in the air and says it is all too difficult and expensive.

It remains to be seen what the cost of dealing with accelerated climate change will be.  All the indications are much much more but then the future generations will be stumping up that one.....so that’s alright then.

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1 hour ago, Rallyman said:

Was listening to radio today and comments on the infrastructure is in a  shocking state of repair and we are in real danger of grid crashing it’s a real mess, and being realistic about costs on how much people will pay   Only a certain amount to go round 

Yet if we find an excuse for another war in the Middle East we can all magically come up with billions of dollars to pay for it.  Question of priorities (or another word beginning with pr - profit).

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6 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

The thing is though that the supply chain, power stations already exist and Aus companies are making huge profits, paying large amounts of tax here and keeping the lifestyle as we know and enjoy stable.

The situations changing though but making it sound simple that Aus should just put heaps of solar farms in, supply Asia with power and then somehow make a profit is farsical at the moment.

It's very easy to say we should do this or that and everyone is saying it should be done faster. In reality it's a big balancing act to maintain, jobs, the price of electricity, tax income, keeping the economy stable.

Of course it isn’t easy.  That’s one of the prime reasons why it isn’t getting the right backing.  Short term easy options are always the preferred ones.  Live for today.

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3 hours ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Yet if we find an excuse for another war in the Middle East we can all magically come up with billions of dollars to pay for it.  Question of priorities (or another word beginning with pr - profit).

It’s not government spending money it’s what it will cost the general public, you have gone to extreme views on coal and climate change compared to 6 months ago , you would send us into Stone Age with ER demands 

all too easy when your livelihood is not dependent on it to be a keyboard warrior 

putting solar on your roof is not going to save the planet , protecting the environment first will and be more beneficial. 

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The big difference between Australia and many of the European countries is that they mostly have nuclear power. We don't. We just sell the wherewithall to others. We actually couldn't handle it, we don't have the skills. 

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10 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

The thing is though that the supply chain, power stations already exist and Aus companies are making huge profits, paying large amounts of tax here and keeping the lifestyle as we know and enjoy stable.

The situations changing though but making it sound simple that Aus should just put heaps of solar farms in, supply Asia with power and then somehow make a profit is farsical at the moment.

It's very easy to say we should do this or that and everyone is saying it should be done faster. In reality it's a big balancing act to maintain, jobs, the price of electricity, tax income, keeping the economy stable.

J P Morgan this past week questioned the future of humanity if we do not act IMMEDIATELY on climate change.

JP Morgan are arch proponents of free market, profit driven, economics and even they recognise climate change as the foremost issue for humanity NOW, not when we can afford it, not when we can fit it in between keeping our jobs, our lifestyles, our holidays, our houses, but NOW

It will require SACRIFICES and our govts have to show LEADERSHIP.

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12 hours ago, BacktoDemocracy said:

J P Morgan this past week questioned the future of humanity if we do not act IMMEDIATELY on climate change.

JP Morgan are arch proponents of free market, profit driven, economics and even they recognise climate change as the foremost issue for humanity NOW, not when we can afford it, not when we can fit it in between keeping our jobs, our lifestyles, our holidays, our houses, but NOW

It will require SACRIFICES and our govts have to show LEADERSHIP.

Mate, governments can show as much leadership as they like but first they have to get elected. You saw the results when Labor had green policies here that would have cost thousands of jobs and you had Labour in the UK have even crazier policies.

JP Morgan say what they say because it's the popular thing to say, not because they are willing to do anything that cuts into their profits or their scarily well paid executives.

They want action, but like everyone else as long as it doesn't affect them or their profits.

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It’s not government spending money it’s what it will cost the general public, you have gone to extreme views on coal and climate change compared to 6 months ago , you would send us into Stone Age with ER demands 
all too easy when your livelihood is not dependent on it to be a keyboard warrior 
putting solar on your roof is not going to save the planet , protecting the environment first will and be more beneficial. 



What will send everyone to the ‘stone-age’ is not doing anything to plan for a transition at the level of authority required to do so. ie:,leaders leading.

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18 hours ago, ssiri said:

 

 


Yes, a transition by its very nature implies it is a big balancing act, and they need to get to doing that transition planning right now, bot bickering over it and kicking the can down the road.

The longer they procrastinate, and avoid doing the job, there will be no transition. The issues they are trying to ‘balance’ into a twill just be catapulted into a transition without any plan or thought, which means they would be on the back foot, incapable of safeguarding existing jobs, unable to provide new jobs, forget controlled tax and options to keep the economy ticking over into a stable transition. Everyone will be dragged into instability and insecurity if they fail to pave the way to achieve the balance, when transitioning. That’s what happens when elected leaders fail to lead.

 

 

They aren't procrastinating. The transitions happening. Saw on the news last night that so many people are using solar panels that the grid is in a bad state and the electricity companies are struggling  to guarantee supply and security. They have to guarantee supply too, it's in their charter to operate. 

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