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Parley

This will soon be banned.

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1 minute ago, Perthbum said:

I think it is only really mysterious and awe inspiring to the indigenous population toots.

Quite right PB.  

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8 hours ago, Perthbum said:

I think it is only really mysterious and awe inspiring to the indigenous population toots.

Why is that ?


I want it all, and I want it now.

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56 minutes ago, Parley said:

Why is that ?

Think about it. 


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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1 hour ago, Perthbum said:

Think about it. 

So why are there thousands and thousands there in the photo.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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27 minutes ago, Parley said:

So why are there thousands and thousands there in the photo.

Family day out with a picnic and a few tins,    See who can throw their can the furthest off of the top of the rock,? Scratch your name in the rock have a piss on the way down, family day out .

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Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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22 hours ago, Dusty Plains said:

There were no surveyors at the climb when I was there. No rangers just heaps of tourists.

You may not have seen any but there has been ongoing monitoring of climbing numbers since at least the 1990s (when it was 74%).   In 2010 it was 38% and by 2015 down to 16.2%

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4 hours ago, Skani said:

You may not have seen any but there has been ongoing monitoring of climbing numbers since at least the 1990s (when it was 74%).   In 2010 it was 38% and by 2015 down to 16.2%

Thhe figures that emerge 3 or 4 months after the climb is closed may be the most interesting figures.

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5 hours ago, Skani said:

You may not have seen any but there has been ongoing monitoring of climbing numbers since at least the 1990s (when it was 74%).   In 2010 it was 38% and by 2015 down to 16.2%

Because people are made to feel guilty now if they want to climb the rock.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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Because people are made to feel guilty now if they want to climb the rock.

 

 

So what? Supposedly stopping the climbing was going to ring the death knell for tourism in the area. So people have said on here. Over 28 years of dwindling numbers, and not whisker of that, in sight. Definitely looks like it’s time to drop it completely- a sound, sustainable business decision.

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Thhe figures that emerge 3 or 4 months after the climb is closed may be the most interesting figures.



Given the numbers have been dwindling since the 1990s, they may well be - but not for the reasons you are advocating.

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So why are there thousands and thousands there in the photo.

 

 

Sheeple. Also known as herd mentality of out of 20 mill population a few 1000s (not tens of thousands), is all that’s left, it’s time to shut it down.

 

More trouble than its worth having it open, for people to litter or desecrate ‘Shane and Sheila woz ‘ere. Lols’. Not the best legacy for anyone.

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12 hours ago, ssiri said:

 

 


Given the numbers have been dwindling since the 1990s, they may well be - but not for the reasons you are advocating.

 

 

They are dwindling, Its not some revelation.

Visitor numbers to Kakadu are down 11% and  Uluru visitor numbers are down 19%, currently. Remote tourism is indeed in a slow nosedive. These figures are driven by two factors, namely the extended wet seasons of late and the increased park entry fees. When running a busines, and your clientele dwindles, then you need to come up with something to attract the visitors back.

At Uluru the plan is to do exactly the opposite. The attraction of visitors to both both parks is a government (read:taxpayer) endeavour to provide jobs for the locals and primarily local aboriginal people.  

I will predict that the taxpayer initiated Yulara resort at Uluru will become a ghost town within 3 years. with most jobs evaporating. Its only a 4 star facility but patrons are charged as if it were a 6 star facility. Why would anyone go there after the climb closes?

Who wins then? The local Aboriginal people? Or the "worldly" keyboard warriors on here, who proclaim to know whats best for the local aboriginal people?

We'll see, won't we.

Edited by Dusty Plains
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Thanks Parley, never thought much of the rock but you stirred me to have a closer look, downloaded this book and started to read, its a fascinating read.

 

Image result for ayers rock abused

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Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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They are dwindling, Its not some revelation.

Visitor numbers to Kakadu are down 11% and  Uluru visitor numbers are down 19%, currently. Remote tourism is indeed in a slow nosedive. These figures are driven by two factors, namely the extended wet seasons of late and the increased park entry fees. When running a busines, and your clientele dwindles, then you need to come up with something to attract the visitors back.

At Uluru the plan is to do exactly the opposite. The attraction of visitors to both both parks is a government (read:taxpayer) endeavour to provide jobs for the locals and primarily local aboriginal people.  

I will predict that the taxpayer initiated Yulara resort at Uluru will become a ghost town within 3 years. with most jobs evaporating. Its only a 4 star facility but patrons are charged as if it were a 6 star facility. Why would anyone go there after the climb closes?

Who wins then? The local Aboriginal people? Or the "worldly" keyboard warriors on here, who proclaim to know whats best for the local aboriginal people?

We'll see, won't we.

 

You best be counting yourself as one of those keyboard warriors who know best for the local aboriginal people

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On 10/10/2019 at 23:24, Dusty Plains said:

They are dwindling, Its not some revelation.

Visitor numbers to Kakadu are down 11% and  Uluru visitor numbers are down 19%, currently. Remote tourism is indeed in a slow nosedive. These figures are driven by two factors, namely the extended wet seasons of late and the increased park entry fees. When running a busines, and your clientele dwindles, then you need to come up with something to attract the visitors back.

At Uluru the plan is to do exactly the opposite. The attraction of visitors to both both parks is a government (read:taxpayer) endeavour to provide jobs for the locals and primarily local aboriginal people.  

I will predict that the taxpayer initiated Yulara resort at Uluru will become a ghost town within 3 years. with most jobs evaporating. Its only a 4 star facility but patrons are charged as if it were a 6 star facility. Why would anyone go there after the climb closes?

Who wins then? The local Aboriginal people? Or the "worldly" keyboard warriors on here, who proclaim to know whats best for the local aboriginal people?

We'll see, won't we.

So white taxpayers dollars should not be spent on clearing up 200 years of abuse of Aboriginal culture, is that where you are at?.

And before you point out I am in the UK, that attitude is one of the reasons I am.  

Edited by BacktoDemocracy
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5 hours ago, ssiri said:

 

You best be counting yourself as one of those keyboard warriors who know best for the local aboriginal people

Absolutely. What do you contribute from the other side of the world? 

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34 minutes ago, BacktoDemocracy said:

So white taxpayers dollars should not be spent on clearing up 200 years of abuse of Aboriginal culture, is that where you are at?.

And before you point out I am in the UK, that attitude is one of the reasons I am.  

No, just all taxpayers. But isn't democracy encompassing of all attitudes,of all points of view and the freedom to express those attitudes. You went Back to Democracy while all the time it was right here.

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28 minutes ago, Dusty Plains said:

Absolutely. What do you contribute from the other side of the world? 

Was thinking this myself 

Edited by Rallyman

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Absolutely. What do you contribute from the other side of the world? 

  

I’m not on the other side of the world, but by all means, do let your preconceptions get in the way of reality

 

 

As for those on the other side of the world, (and when ít included me), we contributed tourist £s, by visiting and, no one I know on ‘the other side of the world’ presently has packed it in because they can’t climb.

 

Maybe the Maccheap Thomas Cook holiday brigade won’t turn up, but those I know aren’t coming to Uluru for the climb anyway, they are in a different tourist bracket and keep the money coming in, and would probably not even notice the Maccheap Thomas Cook brigade anyway (who make up the number, not the costs)

 

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I went to Uluru several years ago. Flew to Alice Springs, camped in Kings Canyon and stayed in the Yulara ‘Luxury’ resort. Yes I enjoyed the trip, had no intention of climbing the rock, but walked part round the base with an indigenous guide.

Was it worth it?

Yes because Uluru is quite something the colours at dawn and sunset are wonderful, and learning more from our guide. Definitely didn’t begrudge the park fees, but can’t remember the cost

No because like lots of travel in Australia, Yulara resort was over priced and to me  not in the luxury category.  We were Disappointed.

Alice Springs was very interesting and enjoyed King’s Canyon.

So over all enjoyed the trip, just over hyped and priced too high. Honestly don’t remember many people climbing the rock when we were there, most seemed to go for the experience of seeing the rock in all its glory.

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No, just all taxpayers. But isn't democracy encompassing of all attitudes,of all points of view and the freedom to express those attitudes. You went Back to Democracy while all the time it was right here.

 

 

On that basis I’m all for absailing down church or other heritage/Victorian buildings, littering the church, pissing in the holy water and etching ‘Shane and Sheila woz ‘ere, lol’ in the pulpit and sandstone or other façades. Let’s have at it.

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5 hours ago, ramot said:

I went to Uluru several years ago. Flew to Alice Springs, camped in Kings Canyon and stayed in the Yulara ‘Luxury’ resort. Yes I enjoyed the trip, had no intention of climbing the rock, but walked part round the base with an indigenous guide.

Was it worth it?

Yes because Uluru is quite something the colours at dawn and sunset are wonderful, and learning more from our guide. Definitely didn’t begrudge the park fees, but can’t remember the cost

No because like lots of travel in Australia, Yulara resort was over priced and to me  not in the luxury category.  We were Disappointed.

Alice Springs was very interesting and enjoyed King’s Canyon.

So over all enjoyed the trip, just over hyped and priced too high. Honestly don’t remember many people climbing the rock when we were there, most seemed to go for the experience of seeing the rock in all its glory.

An opinion based on real life experience! 

Be careful, your kind aren't welcome here 😉 🤣

Edited by unzippy
So @ramot knows I'm pulling their leg..
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