Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

Parley

This will soon be banned.

Recommended Posts

From October 26th Australians will be banned from climbing the rock.

Uluru is owned by all Australians. How can they ban this ?

2019-10-05_14-29-03.jpg


I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, newjez said:

About bloody time.

 

33 minutes ago, newjez said:

About bloody time.

It will be the locals, including the aboriginal management goup that find the going hard after the climb is closed. Most people go to Uluru to climb the rock. Its bucket list thing.  The majority funding of the local aboriginal management group comes from Park entry fees. Many people will not pay the $30 per head entry fee if they cannot climb the rock.  I predict the resort town at Yulara will suffer a downturn as well.  

Edited by Dusty Plains
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Parley said:

From October 26th Australians will be banned from climbing the rock.

Uluru is owned by all Australians. How can they ban this ?

2019-10-05_14-29-03.jpg

What?  Just Australians?   When I went to Uluru there were far more French, Germans, Americans and Poms climbing it.

35 people have died climbing Uluru and many more have been injured.  It will no great loss when climbing it is banned.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Toots said:

What?  Just Australians?   When I went to Uluru there were far more French, Germans, Americans and Poms climbing it.

35 people have died climbing Uluru and many more have been injured.  It will no great loss when climbing it is banned.

When we were there earlier this year it was mostly Asian tourists. We are not rich and we camped at Curtin Springs. If we had pulled up at the Uluru Park entry and were asked to pay $60 and also directed not to climb the rock then we would have turned around there and then. Park entry is for one day only and you must be out of the park by sunset. No camping.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Dusty Plains said:

When we were there earlier this year it was mostly Asian tourists. We are not rich and we camped at Curtin Springs. If we had pulled up at the Uluru Park entry and were asked to pay $60 and also directed not to climb the rock then we would have turned around there and then. Park entry is for one day only and you must be out of the park by sunset. No camping.

 

My sister and I went approx 20 years ago.  I don't remember paying a park entry fee but the whole set up out there is hugely expensive.  We had a package deal and stayed at The Sails In The Desert.  Instead of eating in the hotel we went to the local store as the grub in the hotel was waaaaaay overpriced.  I wouldn't go back to Uluru.  Once was enough.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't you just find any other lump of nondiscript rock in a desert to climb?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Toots said:

My sister and I went approx 20 years ago.  I don't remember paying a park entry fee but the whole set up out there is hugely expensive.  We had a package deal and stayed at The Sails In The Desert.  Instead of eating in the hotel we went to the local store as the grub in the hotel was waaaaaay overpriced.  I wouldn't go back to Uluru.  Once was enough.

Never been there.

I would be surprised if any Australians have.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, newjez said:

Never been there.

I would be surprised if any Australians have.

Have a look at the photo for a clue.


I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Parley said:

Have a look at the photo for a clue.

How do you know if they are Aussies    ..............................  or am I I missing the clue?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What?  Just Australians?   When I went to Uluru there were far more French, Germans, Americans and Poms climbing it.
35 people have died climbing Uluru and many more have been injured.  It will no great loss when climbing it is banned.



Indeed. About bloody time.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Toots said:

How do you know if they are Aussies    ..............................  or am I I missing the clue?

It is the last school holidays before the climb is banned.

Thousands of families are taking their kids now to Uluru to climb the rock.


I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Parley said:

It is the last school holidays before the climb is banned.

Thousands of families are taking their kids now to Uluru to climb the rock.

That's just daft.  I hope they realise it isn't an easy climb at all especially for children.  Because that is the only route for climbing the rock it has been so worn it's shiny and slippery.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They have been gathering in darkness in unprecedented numbers, reaching more than 1000 people at least twice this week as they strive for entry to the exclusive club of those who have scaled Australia’s rocky, red heart.

Exploiting the last school holidays before the world-famous Uluru climb closes on October 26, families have travelled from around the country and overseas in the hope of making a final dash for the summit.

You see their camper-trailers stopped on verges, their utes, SUVs and rental vehicles in overflowing carparks. As dawn gathers, they form a neat line snaking hundreds of metres around the rock’s base, waiting to hear if, on their day, the climb will open.

READ NEXT

John Lauder, a retiree from Newcastle, left his wife and trekked halfway across the continent to start a queue before 4am. “I’m not leaving until I climb it,” Mr Lauder said.

He finally bounded through the gate on his fourth attempt, on Wednesday, when rangers opened the climb “early” just before 7am. The experience hardened Mr Lauder’s view that the “amazing” Uluru summit should remain available to everyone.

Craig Woods, a local Anangu man who has been watching visitors’ antics, described the scene as “two cultures colliding”: patriotic Aussies coming from far and wide to make a pilgrimage to a modern-day national icon. A few kilo­metres down the road, traditional owners whose identity was entwined with Uluru, the land and Dreaming stories branching into the desert, wish the climb had never become a tourist draw.

Thousands of climbers snake their way up Uluru on Friday just weeks before access to the world-famous monolith is banned. Thousands of climbers snake their way up Uluru on Friday just weeks before access to the world-famous monolith is banned.

“We’ve got people across the continent who think their God-given rights are being taken away by a very small minority,” Mr Woods said. “They talk about their culture and their beliefs and that sort of stuff. There are two cultures colliding: one culture that’s maybe 300 years old and another that’s — I don’t know exactly how long ­Anangu have been here — much older.”

Michael and Rachel Wells and their three kids, from Werribee in Victoria, flew to Alice Springs and drove to Uluru-Kata Tjuta Nat­ional Park for a three-day trip.

Ms Wells opted not to climb out of respect for Aboriginal wishes, but Mr Wells felt it was reasonable to go up while the climb remained open. He and six-year-old Harry made it halfway to the summit before pushing and shoving on the crowded route caused them to return. Ella, 13, continued alone.

“It just felt great, that sense of achievement, that I’ve made it to the top, and that I didn’t do it with Dad either,” Ella Wells said.

“I got up there; I didn’t struggle as much as I thought I would … and the view was just amazing.”

Uluru visitors justified their decisions to climb — or not — in different ways. Some said the rock was a natural gift that belonged to no one, others that it was in the whole nation’s custody.

Some thought climbing should have been banned long ago.

“I don’t know much about Aboriginal culture, but it (closing the climb) is obviously something that’s very important to them,” Ella Wells said. “It’s a little bit disappointing (that any children I might have won’t be able to go up), but I can share my experiences with them … and I can still take them there (to Uluru). If I have kids, they can still see it.”

Queenslanders Wade Rodwell, Brad Sutcliffe and Brittany Nunan have mixed views about the closure of Uluru to climbers. Queenslanders Wade Rodwell, Brad Sutcliffe and Brittany Nunan have mixed views about the closure of Uluru to climbers.

Sinking stubbies atop their utes while watching Uluru’s famous sunset view, Grant Davies, Paul Carmody and Travis Hamm, all from Darwin, were not so sure.

“It’s a national shame,” Mr Carmody said. “There’s no spiritual reasons (to close the climb) … this is something that belongs to the whole country.”

Uluru has lately become synonymous with the rift baked into modern Australia as the place the Uluru Statement from the Heart was agreed and signed.

When the UKT board of management announced in 2017 that climbing would be banned from this October, then chair Sammy Wilson likened it to a fairground ride above a sacred monument and added that traditional owners had long “felt a sense of intimidation” to keep the climb open against their better judgment.

Very little else has been said since to help explain Aboriginal views. Campaigners against the closure have appealed to the Australian Human Rights Commission and the UN, saying the climb itself is World Heritage-listed. ­Aboriginal people took explorers to the top of Uluru as early as the 1940s, and historical records suggest previous custodians thought climbing the rock was acceptable.

Mutitjulu leader Craig Woods. Mutitjulu leader Craig Woods.

Uluru visitors found these ­apparent contradictions tough to reconcile. Almost none had met an Anangu person.

Mr Woods explained the senior men who helped explorers climb Uluru many years ago did not know that in a few decades they might be followed by thousands of tourists. “If they had known, then they would’ve said no,” Mr Woods said.

Wayne Curtis, another local leader, agreed that if Anangu had changed their minds, then it was because allowing climbing in the first place had been a mistake.

At least 36 climbers have died in connection with the rock, mostly from heart conditions. Several Anangu cited safety as a major factor — alongside cultural obli­gations — behind the decision to ban climbing, likely forever.

“Anangu feel a huge sense of grief to hear that someone has passed away in their country, on the land,” Mr Woods said. “It doesn’t need to be on the climb; it can be anywhere in the park.”

Visitors to Uluru usually stay in the luxury Ayers Rock Resort — owned by the Indigenous Land and Sea Corporation — at Yulara, which has green grass, a supermarket and thriving businesses. Nearby community Mutitjulu is dusty, rundown and lacking economic engagement.

Just 18 of 906 Ayers Rock Resort employees and 10 of 40 Parks Australia employees identify as Anangu, and only a fraction of those come from Mutitjulu, which is home to almost 400 people.

  • Like 1

I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't climb it.  Didn't like the thought of loads of people in front and behind me whilst climbing.  We did walk around it.  It took nearly 4 hours to do so.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plenty of other places to climb round Australia- who needs to climb in a queue? I suspect many will do it 'illegally' now- it will be a challenge.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plenty of other places to climb round Australia- who needs to climb in a queue? I suspect many will do it 'illegally' now- it will be a challenge.



And get arrested, for the idiots they are.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Parley said:

They have been gathering in darkness in unprecedented numbers, reaching more than 1000 people at least twice this week as they strive for entry to the exclusive club of those who have scaled Australia’s rocky, red heart.

Exploiting the last school holidays before the world-famous Uluru climb closes on October 26, families have travelled from around the country and overseas in the hope of making a final dash for the summit.

You see their camper-trailers stopped on verges, their utes, SUVs and rental vehicles in overflowing carparks. As dawn gathers, they form a neat line snaking hundreds of metres around the rock’s base, waiting to hear if, on their day, the climb will open.

READ NEXT

John Lauder, a retiree from Newcastle, left his wife and trekked halfway across the continent to start a queue before 4am. “I’m not leaving until I climb it,” Mr Lauder said.

He finally bounded through the gate on his fourth attempt, on Wednesday, when rangers opened the climb “early” just before 7am. The experience hardened Mr Lauder’s view that the “amazing” Uluru summit should remain available to everyone.

Craig Woods, a local Anangu man who has been watching visitors’ antics, described the scene as “two cultures colliding”: patriotic Aussies coming from far and wide to make a pilgrimage to a modern-day national icon. A few kilo­metres down the road, traditional owners whose identity was entwined with Uluru, the land and Dreaming stories branching into the desert, wish the climb had never become a tourist draw.

Thousands of climbers snake their way up Uluru on Friday just weeks before access to the world-famous monolith is banned. Thousands of climbers snake their way up Uluru on Friday just weeks before access to the world-famous monolith is banned.

“We’ve got people across the continent who think their God-given rights are being taken away by a very small minority,” Mr Woods said. “They talk about their culture and their beliefs and that sort of stuff. There are two cultures colliding: one culture that’s maybe 300 years old and another that’s — I don’t know exactly how long ­Anangu have been here — much older.”

Michael and Rachel Wells and their three kids, from Werribee in Victoria, flew to Alice Springs and drove to Uluru-Kata Tjuta Nat­ional Park for a three-day trip.

Ms Wells opted not to climb out of respect for Aboriginal wishes, but Mr Wells felt it was reasonable to go up while the climb remained open. He and six-year-old Harry made it halfway to the summit before pushing and shoving on the crowded route caused them to return. Ella, 13, continued alone.

“It just felt great, that sense of achievement, that I’ve made it to the top, and that I didn’t do it with Dad either,” Ella Wells said.

“I got up there; I didn’t struggle as much as I thought I would … and the view was just amazing.”

Uluru visitors justified their decisions to climb — or not — in different ways. Some said the rock was a natural gift that belonged to no one, others that it was in the whole nation’s custody.

Some thought climbing should have been banned long ago.

“I don’t know much about Aboriginal culture, but it (closing the climb) is obviously something that’s very important to them,” Ella Wells said. “It’s a little bit disappointing (that any children I might have won’t be able to go up), but I can share my experiences with them … and I can still take them there (to Uluru). If I have kids, they can still see it.”

Queenslanders Wade Rodwell, Brad Sutcliffe and Brittany Nunan have mixed views about the closure of Uluru to climbers. Queenslanders Wade Rodwell, Brad Sutcliffe and Brittany Nunan have mixed views about the closure of Uluru to climbers.

Sinking stubbies atop their utes while watching Uluru’s famous sunset view, Grant Davies, Paul Carmody and Travis Hamm, all from Darwin, were not so sure.

“It’s a national shame,” Mr Carmody said. “There’s no spiritual reasons (to close the climb) … this is something that belongs to the whole country.”

Uluru has lately become synonymous with the rift baked into modern Australia as the place the Uluru Statement from the Heart was agreed and signed.

When the UKT board of management announced in 2017 that climbing would be banned from this October, then chair Sammy Wilson likened it to a fairground ride above a sacred monument and added that traditional owners had long “felt a sense of intimidation” to keep the climb open against their better judgment.

Very little else has been said since to help explain Aboriginal views. Campaigners against the closure have appealed to the Australian Human Rights Commission and the UN, saying the climb itself is World Heritage-listed. ­Aboriginal people took explorers to the top of Uluru as early as the 1940s, and historical records suggest previous custodians thought climbing the rock was acceptable.

Mutitjulu leader Craig Woods. Mutitjulu leader Craig Woods.

Uluru visitors found these ­apparent contradictions tough to reconcile. Almost none had met an Anangu person.

Mr Woods explained the senior men who helped explorers climb Uluru many years ago did not know that in a few decades they might be followed by thousands of tourists. “If they had known, then they would’ve said no,” Mr Woods said.

Wayne Curtis, another local leader, agreed that if Anangu had changed their minds, then it was because allowing climbing in the first place had been a mistake.

At least 36 climbers have died in connection with the rock, mostly from heart conditions. Several Anangu cited safety as a major factor — alongside cultural obli­gations — behind the decision to ban climbing, likely forever.

“Anangu feel a huge sense of grief to hear that someone has passed away in their country, on the land,” Mr Woods said. “It doesn’t need to be on the climb; it can be anywhere in the park.”

Visitors to Uluru usually stay in the luxury Ayers Rock Resort — owned by the Indigenous Land and Sea Corporation — at Yulara, which has green grass, a supermarket and thriving businesses. Nearby community Mutitjulu is dusty, rundown and lacking economic engagement.

Just 18 of 906 Ayers Rock Resort employees and 10 of 40 Parks Australia employees identify as Anangu, and only a fraction of those come from Mutitjulu, which is home to almost 400 people.

I can see the attraction of following Brittany on that climb!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only significant to the indigenous people who should be the only ones allowed on the rock, all recent immigrants I agree with the ban. 


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Perthbum said:

Only significant to the indigenous people who should be the only ones allowed on the rock, all recent immigrants I agree with the ban. 

Rubbish. We are all Australians.

Creating divisions between us is not a good idea to me.

 

Do you think climbing Mount Everest should be banned ? Do the Sherpas own Mount Everest ? It is ridiculous.

  • Like 3

I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Parley said:

Rubbish. We are all Australians.

Creating divisions between us is not a good idea to me.

 

Do you think climbing Mount Everest should be banned ? Do the Sherpas own Mount Everest ? It is ridiculous.

God damnit parley. I mean Jesus Christ man. Sweet Jehovah! Christ Christ Christ Christ! These god damned people. Holy frigging Mary's skirts.

How can these people take offense at people walking on a rock?

It's not like this is about respecting people's religious freedom is it?

Or is it? Haven't you spent much of your life defending religious freedom?

Edited by newjez
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, newjez said:

God damnit parley. I mean Jesus Christ man. Sweet Jehovah! Christ Christ Christ Christ! These god damned people. Holy frigging Mary's skirts.

How can these people take offense at people walking on a rock?

It's not like this is about respecting people's religious freedom is it?

Or is it? Haven't you spent much of your life defending religious freedom?

Its political not religious. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Religious freedoms do not take away another person's freedoms.


I want it all, and I want it now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Parley said:

Religious freedoms do not take away another person's freedoms.

Seriously mate, if you started climbing up the walls of a cathedral, I think someone might have something to say.

Respect.

You don't have to believe it, but it's just showing respect.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, newjez said:

Seriously mate, if you started climbing up the walls of a cathedral, I think someone might have something to say.

Respect.

You don't have to believe it, but it's just showing respect.

To the local aboriginal people, Uluru means Earth Mother. Up until now there seems to have been no problem in climbing the rock. I was there on a study tour in 1999 and our group met with the Pitjantjatjara Council who manage the park, including the Yulara tourist resort there. Their offices are right there at the rear of the carpark in the shadow of the rock. 

They were very welcoming. After our meeting ,the head of the council / management group asked me if I had climbed the Rock. I said I had not and he replied ( a vague memory but) somthing like this - Ïf you have got the time climb up to the top, the view is spectacular".  Unfortunately we did not have the time. One of our group, in fact the Group leader was also an aboriginal man born in western NSW. He had never been to Uluru and was a tourist / student just like the rest of the group.  

Why would the local aboriginal people object if at the same time they were happy to take on the management of tourism at the site. Uluru is a cultural icon, not a religious site and definitely not a cathedral. I can walk into any cathedral anywhere, yet here in Australia I cannot set foot on Uluru.

When you have worked in both state governments and in Federal govt postings for 35 years like i have, you begin to become aware of the Aboriginal Industry. It exists in state governments and in Canberra.  The aboriginal industry is largely populated by a conglomeration of activists and non-aboriginal hangers on, you know the type. They need a cause to hang onto .

I wonder what the Pitjantjatjara think about this. They must surely be concerned if there is a downturn in their revenue stemming from a downturn in tourist numbers coming through the gate. 

Yep..... political, not religious.

 

Edited by Dusty Plains
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×