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Zoe848

Considering emigrating to Aus with 11 year old

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Hi all,

i was looking for a bit of advice/guidance. I am seriously considering moving to Australia with my 11 year old but I literally have no idea where to start. I have tried googling it for information but I have had no joy. I’m a 31 year old single mom, I have a first class bachelor of honours degree in psychology (criminal behaviour), over 2 years voluntary work AND paid work experience in different roles. What would be my first step to take?

 

thank you in advance :-)

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Make sure you have your child's father's permission to remove them from the country.  Check to see if your skills are on the list for a visa - be aware that psychologists are ten a penny in Australia and negotiating the registration process to actually practice is real wrist slitting territory.  I think you may now need at least a masters to be registered, you always required a fourth (honours) year but they did accept UK honours as equivalent back in the dark ages.  

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Hi Quoll, 

 

thank you you for your reply. Even though I have a psychology degree I don’t want to practice as a psychologist, I would be happy working on probation/resettlement, anything to do with rehabilitating offenders but no on a registered psychologists level if that makes sense? His dad I am hoping won’t be a problem as he’s not really interested in my son anyway. How do I work out what’s the best area for us, and the most affordable housing wise? I scored 65 on the points test so I pass there....there’s just so much to consider isn’t there....

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So is your occupation on the list? Bottom line, go where you can get a job. Why would you want to move to Australia?

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Because the United Kingdom is getting worse, I have wanted to do it for many years now but never had the guts. So I guess it’s now or never. Do you live in Australia? If so would you mind sharing your story?

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First, you need an occupation on the skilled occupation list. Having a degree on its own doesn't mean a lot. 

Do also consider the info about your sons father. He will have to agree and sign the paperwork or you will need a court order. 

With regard funds, this is an expensive process. You should be budgeting in the 20 to 30 thousand mark. The visas are the first part, in the thousands, but that is the drop in the ocean. One of the biggest is that you need to budget to live until you are working. This can take six months, in the mean time you have to pay rent, bills, food, buy and run a car and all the other daily costs. You would not be entitled to any government help during this. 

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It’s worth getting in touch with a migration agent and asking for advice. My agent didn’t ask for any money until we were ready to start applying for the skills assessment but gave lots of advice before that without hesitation. 

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AITSL Skills Assessment submitted: 02/01/19 ~ Successful AITSL Skills Assessment: 25/02/19 (Early Childhood (Pre-Primary) Teacher)  ~ EOI lodged: 16/05/19 (SA 489)  ~ SA sponsorship approved and invited to apply for 489: 29/06/19 ~ Visa application submitted: 02/08/19 ~ Visa granted: 14/01/2020🙂

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I have checked the list of occupations, I was hoping to try and secure a job before moving over there but maybe I’m being naïve?? My plan was to do my research, continue working in the uk for another 12-18 months and add to the savings I have and then maybe take the plunge. JRC please can you give me the name of the agent you used? As you can probably tell I haven’t got a clue so any information I can get I’ll be extremely grateful for.

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15 minutes ago, Zoe848 said:

I have checked the list of occupations, I was hoping to try and secure a job before moving over there but maybe I’m being naïve?? My plan was to do my research, continue working in the uk for another 12-18 months and add to the savings I have and then maybe take the plunge. JRC please can you give me the name of the agent you used? As you can probably tell I haven’t got a clue so any information I can get I’ll be extremely grateful for.

You're not likely to get a job before you arrive especially if you don't have a visa. I doubt your area of expertise is going to be much in demand that anyone would think of sponsoring and they're only temporary visas anyway. There are lots of agents, many post on here - you need to use one who is MARA accredited and they will give you an idea of what you might be eligible for and whether you have any likelihood of getting a visa.

I lived in Australia for over 30 years, back in UK for 8 and now my dad is in care we will be heading back (Australian husband) family in both places so forever torn with the grandkids. Both first world countries with very much the same issues in each, nothing magical about Australia at all. On balance I'd  say probably more opportunity in UK at the moment but that probably depends on whereabouts in UK you are, in the same way that there are parts of Australia you wouldn't want to inflict on your worst  enemy.  

Don't underestimate the pressure of being isolated from family and friends. It's hard enough when you're a couple but when you're a single parent its going to be even worse. Don't expect to develop the same sort of friendships you have at home, cities (where most people in Australia live) can be very insular and most families these days are stretched and needing to be dual income and they struggle to look after their own family without giving too much more to others. 

I'd agree with VS, it's going to cost you a lot of money - if you're looking to support yourself for 6 months while you find a job - worst case scenario - you'd  need around the £30k mark but you'd probably haemorrhage more than that in starting up - bonds, car, insurance, communication etc etc 

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5 hours ago, Zoe848 said:

thank you you for your reply. Even though I have a psychology degree I don’t want to practice as a psychologist, I would be happy working on probation/resettlement, anything to do with rehabilitating offenders but no on a registered psychologists level if that makes sense? His dad I am hoping won’t be a problem as he’s not really interested in my son anyway. How do I work out what’s the best area for us, and the most affordable housing wise? I scored 65 on the points test so I pass there....there’s just so much to consider isn’t there....

Once you get your visa and have arrived in Australia, you can do any work you like.   However you can't get a visa unless your occupation is on the list AND you possess all the qualifications and experience specified.  So your first step should be to have a free initial consultation with a good agent like Go Matilda, to find out if you're even eligible to apply.

If you are eligible to apply, then get your application in as soon as possible, because the lists are being cut all the time - just because your job is on the list now, doesn't mean it'll still be there in a year's time. Once you get the visa - which will take a year or so - then you'll have a short window of time during which you must migrate to Australia.  However if you're not ready to make the full move, you can make a short "activation visit", and then you'll have up to five years to make the permanent move.   So you see, there's nothing to stop you applying now because you'll have plenty of time to get organised and save for the move.

There's no point thinking about getting jobs at this point.  Employers are not going to consider an overseas applicant if you're in an occupation where there are plenty of local candidates.  The majority of migrants take the plunge and arrive with no job, then budget to survive until they get one.  Good luck.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Double post

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 hours ago, Zoe848 said:

Because the United Kingdom is getting worse, I have wanted to do it for many years now but never had the guts. So I guess it’s now or never. Do you live in Australia? If so would you mind sharing your story?

I've lived in Australia for over 30 years.   When I migrated, moving to Australia was a no-brainer - I arrived and got offered three jobs within a week, all of them at a higher level than my old job in the UK.   Housing was cheaper, too, even though I'd settled in the most expensive city in Australia.   I loved the open-mindedness of Sydney compared to the "keeping up appearances" mindset of my old home town.  And it was sunny!

Now, it's different.  Unemployment is about the same as in the UK.   House prices are astronomical in the major cities, to the point where it's becoming normal for thirty-year-olds to still be living at home.   The average Australian lives a long way from a beach - seaside living in strictly for multi-millionaires.  You can find cheaper housing, but it's a supply and demand thing - if you see a town with reasonably priced housing, it's probably because there's no work. 

Personally, I still prefer life in Australia - in fact we tried moving back to the UK for our retirement (because we could buy a home far more cheaply there, so it would free up funds for our retirement), but I I couldn't settle and we've returned.   But that's just a personal preference.   Take a browse around these forums and you'll soon discover that some people take to Oz like a duck to water, while others never settle. 

Another thing to consider is that different parts of Australia are different.   The people of Perth and Sydney are as different as the people of Glasgow and London.   I loved living in Sydney (can't afford it now) but I wouldn't live in Perth if you paid me - yet I know people who think exactly the opposite.   If you migrate, you'll be moving to a foreign country which happens to speak English.  The culture is different and it will take time to adjust.   

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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8 hours ago, Marisawright said:

 I loved living in Sydney (can't afford it now) but I wouldn't live in Perth if you paid me - yet I know people who think exactly the opposite. 

We LOVED Perth, lived there for 28 years, and only left because I took early retirement to spend time with hubby, we wanted a change, and to travel. 

But as Marisawright says, each state is so very very different - you need to do some homework and see what each state has to offer you and your child.

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Left UK 1990 / WA for 28 years / UK / returning Australia as soon as the CV issue allows !

 

 

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Speak to a migration agent first, many should offer an initial assessment without charge, many of the migration agents on here would be recommended. 

In terms of your degree, the UK undergraduate qual on it own won’t get you registration as a psychologist here (or even provisionally registered) which is a nightmare of a process in itself. I see that it not a path you wish to follow anyway. 

You say you meet the criteria for one of the other job titles on the skilled list as you get 65 points. What job title are you looking at? 

There are opportunities within the field, but anything for the govt/public health under the allied health banner generally require registration with the health board. Although other job titles exist of course where registration isn’t required, or there is work in NGOs, it really depends on your experience. 

So I would run your case past a migration agent (needs to have a MARA number) and then if you do qualify, also start to have a look around what’s required for permission from your ex to remove your son from the UK. 

 

Edited by TiaCapan

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On 22/09/2019 at 19:47, Zoe848 said:

I have checked the list of occupations, I was hoping to try and secure a job before moving over there but maybe I’m being naïve?? My plan was to do my research, continue working in the uk for another 12-18 months and add to the savings I have and then maybe take the plunge. JRC please can you give me the name of the agent you used? As you can probably tell I haven’t got a clue so any information I can get I’ll be extremely grateful for.

We are using Smith-Jones Migration. 


AITSL Skills Assessment submitted: 02/01/19 ~ Successful AITSL Skills Assessment: 25/02/19 (Early Childhood (Pre-Primary) Teacher)  ~ EOI lodged: 16/05/19 (SA 489)  ~ SA sponsorship approved and invited to apply for 489: 29/06/19 ~ Visa application submitted: 02/08/19 ~ Visa granted: 14/01/2020🙂

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