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simmo

What is Traditional Aussie Fare?

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1 hour ago, Marilyn said:

Bunnings_Sausage_sizzle.jpg

Ah, now you're talking, a sausage in a white bread roll with brown sauce on it, real Australiana.

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On 05/07/2019 at 01:17, Perthbum said:

White Wines are good in oz but their reds ain’t that good imo,  not a patch on South Africa reds

See post above 😂

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My favourite too.... Great price at First Choice atm........

I'll gloss over the S African connections.
I think the McGuigan supporters might have something to say on that view.

Voted Best Newcomer 2010 by PIO Members.......Thank you....x

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Had a lovely vanilla slice today in Bendigo aka a snot block. Guess they are pretty Aussie?

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14 minutes ago, starlight7 said:

Had a lovely vanilla slice today in Bendigo aka a snot block. Guess they are pretty Aussie?

Probably but I can’t stand ‘em.  Custard tarts on the other hand...

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12 hours ago, Bulya said:

Probably but I can’t stand ‘em.  Custard tarts on the other hand...

I don't like either of them but I like a good sharp lemon tart.  😀

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What about a coffee scroll ?


I want it all, and I want it now.

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Apple slice are nice too 


I want it all, and I want it now.

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1 minute ago, Toots said:

I don't like either of them but I like a good sharp lemon tart.  😀

My favourite.  Lemon or lemon/lime or plain lime.  Never tangy enough though.  I make up for it by getting the occasional bag of Sours Squirms, and they are ‘tangy’  

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On 05/07/2019 at 03:17, Perthbum said:

White Wines are good in oz but their reds ain’t that good imo,  not a patch on South Africa reds

I miss South African wines.  The ones I've tried in the UK and Australia haven't lived up to my memories of them (from when I lived in Swaziland).  A South African friend told me the problem is that the long travel time affects the wine so it's never the same overseas.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 02/07/2019 at 16:02, Toots said:

Is there really any traditional Aussie fare?  Most of it involves meat in some form or another - no good for me and you could get them in any other country.  Those big spring roll thingies are horrible Simmo.   

There used to be a pub near The Rocks in Sydney that did pizzas with a choice of toppings including, kangaroo, crocodile and emu.

 

It's still there @Toots - the Australian (menu: https://australianheritagehotel.com/eats/)

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according to wiki 

"

Iconic Australian foods include ANZAC biscuits, lamingtons, Tim Tams, fairy bread and Vegemite, a vitamin-rich, savoury brewers yeast which is spread on toasted bread.[40][41] Another iconic dish is pavlova but the origins of this meringue-based cake are contested, with New Zealand also laying claim to its invention.[42][43]

Damper is a traditional Australian soda bread prepared by swagmen, drovers and other travellers. It is a wheat flour based bread, traditionally baked in the coals of a campfire.

The Australian hamburger consists of a fried beef patty, served with shredded lettuce and sliced tomato in a (usually toasted) bread roll. Tomato sauce (similar to ketchup but made with less sugar with a more liquid texture) or barbecue sauce are almost always included. Beetroot and fried onions are also common additions, and sometimes sliced pineapple. Other frequently-served hamburger options are bacon, fried egg and cheese. Pickles are rarely included, except in burgers from American chains.[44]

A common takeaway food is the meat pie, often found at bakeries and especially popular at AFL matches. In Adelaide, a common variant is the pie floater, which is a meat pie served in a bowl of pea soup.

Barbecue sausages are common as a street food, becoming iconic for their availability outside most Bunnings. They are served in a slice of white bread optionally with onions and tomato sauce."

 

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On 15/08/2019 at 16:39, simmo said:

according to wiki 

"

Iconic Australian foods include ANZAC biscuits, lamingtons, Tim Tams, fairy bread and Vegemite, a vitamin-rich, savoury brewers yeast which is spread on toasted bread.[40][41] Another iconic dish is pavlova but the origins of this meringue-based cake are contested, with New Zealand also laying claim to its invention.[42][43]

Damper is a traditional Australian soda bread prepared by swagmen, drovers and other travellers. It is a wheat flour based bread, traditionally baked in the coals of a campfire.

The Australian hamburger consists of a fried beef patty, served with shredded lettuce and sliced tomato in a (usually toasted) bread roll. Tomato sauce (similar to ketchup but made with less sugar with a more liquid texture) or barbecue sauce are almost always included. Beetroot and fried onions are also common additions, and sometimes sliced pineapple. Other frequently-served hamburger options are bacon, fried egg and cheese. Pickles are rarely included, except in burgers from American chains.[44]

A common takeaway food is the meat pie, often found at bakeries and especially popular at AFL matches. In Adelaide, a common variant is the pie floater, which is a meat pie served in a bowl of pea soup.

Barbecue sausages are common as a street food, becoming iconic for their availability outside most Bunnings. They are served in a slice of white bread optionally with onions and tomato sauce."

 

Don't forget that Australia invented Weetbix.

Later ripped off by the poms and rebadged as weetabix.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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1 hour ago, Parley said:

Don't forget that Australia invented Weetbix.

Later ripped off by the poms and rebadged as weetabix.

In that case you would think they are the same but I prefer Weetabix.  Just tastes better.

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8 hours ago, Parley said:

Don't forget that Australia invented Weetbix.

Later ripped off by the poms and rebadged as weetabix.

Not quite true

Wiki

Produced in the UK since 1932, Weetabix is the British version of the original Australian Weet-Bix. Both Weet-Bix and Weetabix were invented by Bennison Osborne, an Australian. Weet-Bix was introduced in Australia through the company “Grain Products Limited” in the mid-1920s, with funding from businessman Arthur Shannon and marketing assistance from Osborne’s New Zealand friend Malcolm Macfarlane. To both Osborne’s and Macfarlane’s disappointment, Grain Products sold both its Australian company (in 1928) and then its New Zealand company (in 1930), to the Sanitarium Health Foods Company. Osborne and Macfarlane then went to South Africa where Arthur Shannon, the owner of Grain Products, funded another Weet-Bix factory. While in South Africa, Osborne modified his Weet-Bix recipe and with Macfarlane, obtained private funding and began the development of a new company, The British and African Cereal Company Limited, naming the new company's product, Weetabix. The company commenced business in England in 1932 in an unused gristmill at Burton Latimer, near Kettering.[5] In 1936, the name of the company was changed to Weetabix Limited.

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Do you want "Anglo-Australian" or "ethnic" cuisine? Many places offer both or a combination, if you want chips with your stir-fry/curry. One of my local cafes is run by a Vietnamese couple with Aussie-born sons who seem at home with whatever their parents cook for them. You can have a pho or a bacon and egg roll.

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