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Dm1

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On 21/06/2019 at 10:10, ramot said:

I would say it depends a bit on your age. It’s much more appealing in your 70’s plus to be wearing light clothes and your trainers to go for a regular walk for most of the year, than look at the weather outside in UK and make the same decision. Obviously exceptions, but as I spend about 3 months in UK most years, and avoid winter, I definitely see far fewer older people bothering in comparison to the Sunny Coast. We are out in our droves!!!  Coastal walking groups, Tai chi and yoga on the beach, walking along the beach, which is sparkling at the moment in mid winter. Yes Summer is hot for a couple of months, but you get up earlier so you don’t miss out,  it just about perfect for the rest of the year.

Know what you mean.  I have been cooped up today as it hasn’t stopped raining here in the Redlands the past 24 hours.  Very unusual, particularly this time of the year.  Can’t remember the last day I wasn’t out and about.


Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

No, they didn't. They arrived with a determination to make a go of it, come what may.   And they stuck it out even though it wasn't always easy.

That's totally different from attitudes like, "Let's give it a go, we can always come home if we don't like it", or "Nothing's forever, we'll never know if we don't try". 

The times are different too.   They came to an Australia with abundant opportunity, cheap housing, plenty of jobs.  Nowadays Australia has some of the most expensive housing in the world and unemployment problems like any other developed country.   

I love living in Australia but I count myself lucky that I arrived when it was an easy place to settle.

About 2 million people emigrated, So, none of them sold up????  Or do you think I was telling porkies?

I wonder if you were that loudmouthed person 3 tables from me on the ship in 1963; the one who knew everything and loudly poo pooed everyone else's ideas and beliefs?

Cheers, Bobj.

 

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31 minutes ago, Bobj said:

About 2 million people emigrated, So, none of them sold up????  

 

I didn’t say they didn’t sell up. I said they didn’t come to Australia to TRY IT OUT. They came determined to make it work

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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8 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I didn’t say they didn’t sell up. I said they didn’t come to Australia to TRY IT OUT. They came determined to make it work

I think most people move determined to work, but for some its too easy to compare everything to where they have come from and just give up.

Back in the 50s or 60s most had nothing to go back for anyway.

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8 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I didn’t say they didn’t sell up. I said they didn’t come to Australia to TRY IT OUT. They came determined to make it work

your words, Marisa, "No, they didn't," was in answer to selling up, as it was my first point in the discussion...And your first point, as well.

But, if you want to wriggle out of it, be so good as to offer a small apology.

Cheers, Bobj.

 

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1 hour ago, Bobj said:

your words, Marisa, "No, they didn't," was in answer to selling up, as it was my first point in the discussion...And your first point, as well.

But, if you want to wriggle out of it, be so good as to offer a small apology.

Cheers, Bobj.

 

It wasn’t intended as the answer to your first point, it was intended as a response to the whole statement, taken in the context of the entire discussion. My apologies for expressing myself in a manner that you didn’t find clear

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Marisawright said:

It wasn’t intended as the answer to your first point, it was intended as a response to the whole statement, taken in the context of the entire discussion. My apologies for expressing myself in a manner that you didn’t find clear

I will accept your very oblique apology, because you know as well as I do, that you got hooked fair and square and, as a way of wriggling out of it, explained the way you did...and lost the ‘arguement’. And that lessens my opinion of you.

Cheers, Bobj.

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Marisawright said:

No, they didn't. They arrived with a determination to make a go of it, come what may.   And they stuck it out even though it wasn't always easy.

That's totally different from attitudes like, "Let's give it a go, we can always come home if we don't like it", or "Nothing's forever, we'll never know if we don't try". 

The times are different too.   They came to an Australia with abundant opportunity, cheap housing, plenty of jobs.  Nowadays Australia has some of the most expensive housing in the world and unemployment problems like any other developed country.   

I love living in Australia but I count myself lucky that I arrived when it was an easy place to settle.

I'm sticking my oar in here  .................  I agree with Marisa.  Migrants in the 50's were far more prepared to stick it out come what may.  Most of them did settle and were successful whereas nowadays migrants are more as Marisa stated "Let's give it a go, we can always come home if we don't like it" or "Nothing's forever, we'll never know if we don't try".  It's far easier for current migrants to think that way.  Australia has drastically changed since the 50s and 60's.  

...........................  by the way I'm not looking to disagree with anyone else just stating how I read Marisa's post.  It's easy to misunderstand what someone is trying to say.  

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1 hour ago, Bobj said:

I will accept your very oblique apology, because you know as well as I do, that you got hooked fair and square and, as a way of wriggling out of it, explained the way you did...and lost the ‘arguement’. And that lessens my opinion of you.

Cheers, Bobj.

 

 

 

I know what I meant, I can’t help it if you didn’t get my meaning. Looks like Toots has no problem understanding my intent.

it is unfortunate because it means you’ve never addressed the issue that I did mean to raise

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I’ve just read an article that says one and a half million came as 10pd poms, and about two hundred and fifty thousand returned, and one comment sticks out was that the reason many returned was that they expected everything to be handed to them on a plate. Also a proportion of those also returned to Australia and became known as boomerang poms. 

I have no idea how many immigrants come with the attitude of I’ll give it a try and can always go home. My two children who came here certainly didn’t, it took my son 61/2 years to get residence and he was never going to give up, and that goes for my daughter as well and all of their friends, who have worked hard and made a success of their lives. I am talking about married and single friends over the last 14 years. If you add into the mix, my extended family and friends who moved here from Africa, then they were determined to make it work, no we can go back for them.

Of course many potential immigrants don’t stay for a variety of reasons, Australia isn’t for everyone, but you stand a better chance if you have the right attitude. Far too expensive an exercise for most to come with a half hearted attitude.

I know quite a few 10pd poms, have no idea if they sold up to come here, but they haven’t regretted coming here, like my extended African family, they made Australia home, they  had children here, and then grandchildren, so this is where their family and life is. Newer immigrants who return don’t seem to be able to think long term like that, the pull of family back home is too strong.

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23 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I know what I meant, I can’t help it if you didn’t get my meaning. Looks like Toots has no problem understanding my intent.

it is unfortunate because it means you’ve never addressed the issue that I did mean to raise

Occasionally the written word is open to misinterpretation.  Perhaps sometimes there is fault on both sides. 

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23 hours ago, sualg said:

Respectfully disagree, I’m in Narrabeen on the northern beaches, short walk to the beach and as I’m logged into my NAB account I can categorically tell you I’m not anyway near a millionaire. 

Point was valid i think. Unless you've lived in Narrabeen for 20 years or live in a unit youve gotta be a millionare. it's millions for a family home.

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On ‎17‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 04:24, Dm1 said:

 

I am grateful for being here.

i don't want to.be a turf trotter, looking always for verdant pastures and complaining when there is a dry outback field!

to help me do.so i think the following:

when in Rome

In UK there are too many people

in Australia the people say what they think, they are usually honest in opinion, even if this hurts, at least i know where i stand.

in UK people are always talking about money, mortgage, pensions, the weather, tv, here the people talk about the price of sheep, super, the Footie, the weekend camping, beer, barbique and the weather!

here the weather is better!

there is good team spirit in Australia

in UK its ok to boast, in Australia if you boast you get told figjam which i thought was a preserve!

in Australia if you complain you are whining and in UK it is seen as conversation

in UK people are better read and more academic with sense of history, in Australia i.have found that people think Chaucer is a brand for chainsaw! So i read alone and talk about footie in conversation, And barbique!

but in all, when we travel and move things are always different so we must embrace this fact! When in Rome

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On 03/07/2019 at 09:00, Itraf said:

in UK people are always talking about money, mortgage, pensions, the weather, tv, here the people talk about the price of sheep, super, the Footie, the weekend camping, beer, barbique and the weather!

 

You haven't been to Canberra then....at lunchtime they log onto super to check their millions and see what investment properties they can buy, and their education is on a par with the UK surpassing it in a lot of places.  Because of the European heritage of a lot of them know a lot more about Europe than I do and I travelled a lot round Europe, but I guess not as somebody who's family roots are in Italy, Slovenia, Holland, Ireland, Greece or Germany etc...   It's interesting to listen to their perspectives although they're all "Aussies" now.

 

 


"Nationalism is an infantile disease, it is the measles of mankind." Albert Einstein

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On 03/07/2019 at 09:00, Itraf said:

I am grateful for being here.

i don't want to.be a turf trotter, looking always for verdant pastures and complaining when there is a dry outback field!

to help me do.so i think the following:

when in Rome

In UK there are too many people

in Australia the people say what they think, they are usually honest in opinion, even if this hurts, at least i know where i stand.

in UK people are always talking about money, mortgage, pensions, the weather, tv, here the people talk about the price of sheep, super, the Footie, the weekend camping, beer, barbique and the weather!

here the weather is better!

there is good team spirit in Australia

in UK its ok to boast, in Australia if you boast you get told figjam which i thought was a preserve!

in Australia if you complain you are whining and in UK it is seen as conversation

in UK people are better read and more academic with sense of history, in Australia i.have found that people think Chaucer is a brand for chainsaw! So i read alone and talk about footie in conversation, And barbique!

but in all, when we travel and move things are always different so we must embrace this fact! When in Rome

So funny how experiences differ. Maybe it’s an Interstate thing? I love working for British bosses here when I get the chance  (contract IT). They are so much clearer on expectations and honest in their conversations than Aussies with their tendency to passive aggression and bullying... 

QLD winters waaay better than UK winters - but QLD summers? Much nicer to be out and about in UK then cooped up in the Air-con. Weather in Brisbane now just perfect however!

I’ve found Aussie males way ahead of British in the boasting stakes - I’m constantly reminded by my management consultant colleagues how fabulous and talented they are and how much they know about everything. They seem to be frightened of their Aussie women (one male colleague said he was ‘pussy whipped!’)  I do admire the way that Australians celebrate success though, and their optimism even when punching above their weight..

Just my experiences though - I’m sure it’s different for everyone 

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Pondering a comment, I checked the time - 1630 and thought, "OMG, the footies on! I know the Swans will probably get thrashed by Geelong but I still want to watch it." Actually, it's West Coast about to kick off against North Melbourne at Optus Stadium so I won't bother to watch it. Thinking about Optus Stadium invokes happy memories of my two recent trips to Perth and southwestern WA. I thought about moving over there but perhaps it's too late to emigrate again.

I've realized that I just "live" here now. I've reached the point in my trajectory where I no longer care about "Australia v England" unless it's sport of course. I heard the ex-cricketers on the Fox Cricket show whingeing about how "the Pommie tabloids always give them a serve." As if the same thing does not happen here! Is Stuart Broad still public enemy number one?!

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23 minutes ago, MARYROSE02 said:

Pondering a comment, I checked the time - 1630 and thought, "OMG, the footies on! I know the Swans will probably get thrashed by Geelong but I still want to watch it." Actually, it's West Coast about to kick off against North Melbourne at Optus Stadium so I won't bother to watch it. Thinking about Optus Stadium invokes happy memories of my two recent trips to Perth and southwestern WA. I thought about moving over there but perhaps it's too late to emigrate again.

I've realized that I just "live" here now. I've reached the point in my trajectory where I no longer care about "Australia v England" unless it's sport of course. I heard the ex-cricketers on the Fox Cricket show whingeing about how "the Pommie tabloids always give them a serve." As if the same thing does not happen here! Is Stuart Broad still public enemy number one?!

I’m surprised that Australian cricketers think that the English media have it in for them. I’ve always thought that the tone that the red tops back home took was pretty respectful when it came to the Australians. There’s rivalry for sure, but also recognition of the many great teams and outstanding players that they’ve produced in recent decades. Maybe I’ve got that wrong? 

I gave up on following the Australian media years ago due to what I consider to be inherent anti-British sentiment. I don’t know if that’s representative generally of how Australians see us, but after a while I found the snidey digs and put downs a bit depressing. After the World Cup win a couple of my work colleagues were desperate to show me the front cover of The Age newspaper which went on at length about England’s luck / undeserved winners/ poor New Zealand etc. and had a very unpleasant tone to it all.

I’m sure the Australian media will be gearing up to burn effigies of Stuart Broad in the coming weeks, so I’m glad I’ll be restricting myself to the BBC and The Guardian’s coverage! 

 

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1 hour ago, Saurer Pfirsich said:

I’m surprised that Australian cricketers think that the English media have it in for them. I’ve always thought that the tone that the red tops back home took was pretty respectful when it came to the Australians. There’s rivalry for sure, but also recognition of the many great teams and outstanding players that they’ve produced in recent decades. Maybe I’ve got that wrong? 

I gave up on following the Australian media years ago due to what I consider to be inherent anti-British sentiment. I don’t know if that’s representative generally of how Australians see us, but after a while I found the snidey digs and put downs a bit depressing. After the World Cup win a couple of my work colleagues were desperate to show me the front cover of The Age newspaper which went on at length about England’s luck / undeserved winners/ poor New Zealand etc. and had a very unpleasant tone to it all.

I’m sure the Australian media will be gearing up to burn effigies of Stuart Broad in the coming weeks, so I’m glad I’ll be restricting myself to the BBC and The Guardian’s coverage! 

 

The Australian media make my blood boil with the way they carry on with the anti-British stuff.  If they were slagging off any other country they would be called racist.  I find the media are far, far worse than the Aussie man in the street types.  A lot of the people I know find the anti-British guff in the media embarrassing.

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1 hour ago, Saurer Pfirsich said:

I’m surprised that Australian cricketers think that the English media have it in for them. I’ve always thought that the tone that the red tops back home took was pretty respectful when it came to the Australians. There’s rivalry for sure, but also recognition of the many great teams and outstanding players that they’ve produced in recent decades. Maybe I’ve got that wrong? 

I gave up on following the Australian media years ago due to what I consider to be inherent anti-British sentiment. I don’t know if that’s representative generally of how Australians see us, but after a while I found the snidey digs and put downs a bit depressing. After the World Cup win a couple of my work colleagues were desperate to show me the front cover of The Age newspaper which went on at length about England’s luck / undeserved winners/ poor New Zealand etc. and had a very unpleasant tone to it all.

I’m sure the Australian media will be gearing up to burn effigies of Stuart Broad in the coming weeks, so I’m glad I’ll be restricting myself to the BBC and The Guardian’s coverage! 

 

Ever asked yourself why poms are so disliked all over the world?  If you haven’t, it’s about time you did 

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1 hour ago, Toots said:

The Australian media make my blood boil with the way they carry on with the anti-British stuff.  If they were slagging off any other country they would be called racist.  I find the media are far, far worse than the Aussie man in the street types.  A lot of the people I know find the anti-British guff in the media embarrassing.

I'm glad that it's just a media beat-up Toots, and that ordinary people don't see Brits that way. Rivalry is one thing, but ultimately, you've got to respect other nations. 

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1 hour ago, Saurer Pfirsich said:

I'm glad that it's just a media beat-up Toots, and that ordinary people don't see Brits that way. Rivalry is one thing, but ultimately, you've got to respect other nations. 

Bolleaux!  You have to earn respect.

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3 hours ago, Saurer Pfirsich said:

I’m surprised that Australian cricketers think that the English media have it in for them. I’ve always thought that the tone that the red tops back home took was pretty respectful when it came to the Australians. There’s rivalry for sure, but also recognition of the many great teams and outstanding players that they’ve produced in recent decades. Maybe I’ve got that wrong? 

I gave up on following the Australian media years ago due to what I consider to be inherent anti-British sentiment. I don’t know if that’s representative generally of how Australians see us, but after a while I found the snidey digs and put downs a bit depressing. After the World Cup win a couple of my work colleagues were desperate to show me the front cover of The Age newspaper which went on at length about England’s luck / undeserved winners/ poor New Zealand etc. and had a very unpleasant tone to it all.

I’m sure the Australian media will be gearing up to burn effigies of Stuart Broad in the coming weeks, so I’m glad I’ll be restricting myself to the BBC and The Guardian’s coverage! 

 

I wonder whether you might be over-sensitive.  If snidey digs upset you it is likely to encourage them, I’m afraid.  The same would happen in reverse.  We always had overseas cricketers in our team in England and most over the years were Australian....and they got far more stick than I get.

I mix with Aussies almost exclusively.  I play cricket and golf with them and am a Queensland cricket umpire.

As such I engage in a great deal of discussion with the locals on the relative merits or otherwise of the English and Australian cricket team as cricket is my passion and always has been.  In general I find their assessment of the Aussie players far harsher than their assessment of the English ones.

I unashamedly support the England team (it would be ridiculous anyway if I did otherwise) but I take a balanced view.  I accept England’s losses with equanimity and I find this is respected and the digs are limited to a single comment and then we move on and have a discussion on the match and the players.  Equally I don’t seek to over-egg England’s successes over Australia either.


Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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2 hours ago, Bulya said:

Ever asked yourself why poms are so disliked all over the world?  If you haven’t, it’s about time you did 

Eh?  I've lived in France, Belgium, Switzerland and the USA.  Nowhere did I get the impression the Poms are disliked.  I'm Scottish and even I don't dislike the English. 😉

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3 minutes ago, Gbye grey sky said:

I wonder whether you might be over-sensitive.  If snidey digs upset you it is likely to encourage them, I’m afraid.  The same would happen in reverse.  We always had overseas cricketers in our team in England and most over the years were Australian....and they got far more stick than I get.

I mix with Aussies almost exclusively.  I play cricket and golf with them and am a Queensland cricket umpire.

As such I engage in a great deal of discussion with the locals on the relative merits or otherwise of the English and Australian cricket team as cricket is my passion and always has been.  In general I find their assessment of the Aussie players far harsher than their assessment of the English ones.

I unashamedly support the England team (it would be ridiculous anyway if I did otherwise) but I take a balanced view.  I accept England’s losses with equanimity and I find this is respected and the digs are limited to a single comment and then we move on and have a discussion on the match and the players.  Equally I don’t seek to over-egg England’s successes over Australia either.

Possibly I am a little over-sensitive. I've been exposed to a fair amount of 'Pommy-bashing' over the years from my wife's family and friends and my work-colleagues. As a result, I've learned to keep my head down and to avoid unpleasantness. I'm a natural introvert anyway, but when I'm in a social situation and people start with this stuff I just go quiet, or if I can, leave!

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