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Jwoo

Go home to uk or build retirement in Melbourne?

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8 hours ago, Marisawright said:

The "half of all migrants" figure was often quoted on Wanted Down Under, so who knows where it came from.  But  I do wonder if everyone you meet who '" loves it here" is really as happy as you think.

I notice two different kinds of migrants.  There are people like me, who enjoy their life in Australia and feel settled. Then are migrants who LOVE it here and think it's AMAZING and life back in Britain is absolute SH!!* these days and don't you DARE criticise anything about their WONDERFUL NEW COUNTRY!!!   They're the ones that are lying to themselves.  That's why they can't let anyone mention the downsides of Australia, because they can't afford to question themselves - it might burst the bubble of denial they've created for themselves.  

I’d say that there are two other groups in addition to the two you listed. One is the cohort who absolutely hate it here and don’t have a single positive thing to say about the place or its people. I often think that these are people who invested so much emotionally and financially in their new life that when it doesn’t work out they turn on the place out of a sense of betrayal. They tend to be more notable on forums like this one, and their posts are often a painful read.

The other group are those who think Australia is fine, but have no real commitment to the place. They have enjoyable lives here but don’t necessarily see it as their ‘forever home.’ I find that people within this cohort are pragmatists who often come here for a job opportunity, a time-limited adventure, or with an Australian partner. They enjoy most aspects of their lives here, but are also non-partisan in their appraisal of the place and are open to returning to the UK or moving somewhere else if better opportunities present themselves. 

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14 minutes ago, Saurer Pfirsich said:

I’d say that there are two other groups in addition to the two you listed. One is the cohort who absolutely hate it here and don’t have a single positive thing to say about the place or its people. I often think that these are people who invested so much emotionally and financially in their new life that when it doesn’t work out they turn on the place out of a sense of betrayal. They tend to be more notable on forums like this one, and their posts are often a painful read.

The other group are those who think Australia is fine, but have no real commitment to the place. They have enjoyable lives here but don’t necessarily see it as their ‘forever home.’ I find that people within this cohort are pragmatists who often come here for a job opportunity, a time-limited adventure, or with an Australian partner. They enjoy most aspects of their lives here, but are also non-partisan in their appraisal of the place and are open to returning to the UK or moving somewhere else if better opportunities present themselves. 

I'm led to believe the 50% returnee figure also includes those on Temp or WHV, not just those on PR visa's. When you think how many do come here for a gap year etc it certainly makes the figure more realistic.

   Cal x

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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1 hour ago, calNgary said:

I'm led to believe the 50% returnee figure also includes those on Temp or WHV, not just those on PR visa's. When you think how many do come here for a gap year etc it certainly makes the figure more realistic.

   Cal x

The official figures are based on departing passenger figures, so basically it includes everyone who ticks the boxes to say they are leaving permanently! 

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On 08/06/2019 at 02:53, Jwoo said:

And of course i am pining for London c1974, so the whole thing might be a disaster anyway.

The 'whole thing' will definitely be a disaster because 1974 London no longer exists, and it seems that you haven't yet established what you really want for your future. I sympathise because I feel the same lack of belonging; it's what happens when you're uprooted at an early age and transported to a place where you feel no connection. You could get one thousand opinions regarding what others would do 'in your shoes' but you're the only one who fits your shoes. You are the Cinderella in your own fairy-tale! Trust your instincts and go with your heart, not your head.

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12 hours ago, Saurer Pfirsich said:

I’d say that there are two other groups in addition to the two you listed. One is the cohort who absolutely hate it here and don’t have a single positive thing to say about the place or its people. I often think that these are people who invested so much emotionally and financially in their new life that when it doesn’t work out they turn on the place out of a sense of betrayal. They tend to be more notable on forums like this one, and their posts are often a painful read.

The other group are those who think Australia is fine, but have no real commitment to the place. They have enjoyable lives here but don’t necessarily see it as their ‘forever home.’ I find that people within this cohort are pragmatists who often come here for a job opportunity, a time-limited adventure, or with an Australian partner. They enjoy most aspects of their lives here, but are also non-partisan in their appraisal of the place and are open to returning to the UK or moving somewhere else if better opportunities present themselves. 

You mentioned you thought most migrants were happy and settled and I was referring to that group - I've noticed there are two sub-groups within that cohort, the ones who are happy and the ones that are too happy to be true.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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30 minutes ago, Wanderer Returns said:

The 'whole thing' will definitely be a disaster because 1974 London no longer exists... I sympathise because I feel the same lack of belonging; it's what happens when you're uprooted at an early age and transported to a place where you feel no connection. You could get one thousand opinions regarding what others would do 'in your shoes' but you're the only one who fits your shoes. You are the Cinderella in your own fairy-tale! Trust your instincts and go with your heart, not your head.

I don't think you can say it will "definitely" be a disaster because although 1974 London doesn't exist, that may not matter.   If he's one of those people who feel a connection to place, then the detail of what people are wearing, how they behave, how busy it is etc , will not matter a jot. He'll be on home soil and that will fill the void.  

You are absolutely right - there are some people who lose their connection to their homeland but don't find a connection to their new country either. I know a few. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thanks again all for your very valuable input. I think Marisa is right I will have to tackle this at some point but I am clear now that this is not the job to go for. Also btw I am a goil!

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On 08/06/2019 at 03:38, Marisawright said:

Waiting till you've retired and then going back to the UK isn't as easy as you might think. For one thing, while your superannuation pension won't be taxed in Australia, it will be taxed in the UK.  So will your Australian government pension ( assuming you can even claim it, which is doubtful for various reasons).  You won't get any British pension to offset those losses.  And both will be subject to the vagaries of the exchange rate.

If, on the other hand, you go back now, there's every chance you could get a further job offer in London at the end of your contract, so if you're enjoying it, you could potentially stay in the UK right up until you're ready to retire. At that point, depending on how the finances work out, you might have to return to Australia - but you'll have your superannuation and you'll still be eligible for the Australian govt pension, so you've lost nothing.

Marisa raised an excellent point regarding pensions. I’m in a similar situation to the OP in that I don’t have much in my Super either, partly due to a misspent youth, plus a misspent 20s and 30s! I'm not proud to admit that I’ll probably be dependent on the state pension either here or in Australia, should I live to a ripe old age. I know it shouldn’t be about the money but it is a consideration. As well as being a great country to live, Australia has one of the most generous state pensions and social care systems in the world. Pensions here in the UK are contribution-based and not means tested like in Australia, so you won’t get a penny out of the system here unless you’ve lived and worked here for at least 10 years - and even then it’s probably going to be peanuts. There used to be a Social Security agreement between the UK and Australia but it was cancelled back in 2001, due to the tightfistedness of the British government at that time.

https://www.dss.gov.au/about-the-department/international/international-social-security-agreements/termination-of-the-social-security-agreement-with-the-united-kingdom-uk-1-march-2001/termination-of-the-social-security-agreement-with-the-uk-information-for-prospective-migrants

Quote:

Can I get an Australian pension if I am living in the UK?

‘Australia will continue to pay its Age Pensions to pensioners going to the UK under it's general portability laws. However, Australia will not grant pensions to people residing in the UK (nor did it prior to the Agreement terminating).

Pensioners planning to travel to the UK (and other overseas countries) should advise their nearest Centrelink office.

Another consideration is access to the NHS, which is no longer free to returning expats. You have to be 'ordinarily resident' here in the UK to get free healthcare.

https://www.datadictionary.nhs.uk/data_dictionary/nhs_business_definitions/o/ordinarily_resident_de.asp?shownav=1

The definition of ordinarily resident is clearly ambiguous, but I'd want to make sure I had a UK address, driving licence, a bank account/credit card, and was registered with a GP before I attempted to access NHS services. And if you ever have to fill in a form with a box to tick which asks; 'Have you been been resident in the UK for the last 3 years?' Well... 😉 

Hope this is helpful,

Martin.

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Based on the experience of others on this forum, proving you’re ordinarily resident for the NHS doesn’t appear to be too hard, at least not yet. 

I agree the pension situation would make it hard if she waits till she wants to retire 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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10 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Based on the experience of others on this forum, proving you’re ordinarily resident for the NHS doesn’t appear to be too hard, at least not yet.

That's good to know. We didn't have a problem when we came back 5 years ago, but as you know they keep tightening things up to try and curb health tourism.

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Basically, what we have found with the NHS is that when you register with a GP and things you will be asked if you are a resident and have been for six months or more. If you answer no, you will simply be asked a couple of questions and it's as simple as that. If you need more extensive treatment such as hospital care, they will ask for evidence if you haven't been resident for six months such as tenancy agreement. 

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