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.............  and the holding babies has started again.  Why would anyone hand over their baby to a grinning stranger who is desperate to look like a genuine bloke beats me.

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3 hours ago, Skani said:

They have their lives absolutely dominated by their spouse's  career in politics, they see their federal politician spouses very little because they are away in Canberra  so often and all over the country attending meetings,  they sacrifice a lot to support their  spouses - including copping abuse for their spouse's political allegiances, having to put up with extra security around them and raising their children almost as a single parent.  I think they should be acknowledged.   I wouldn't do it for quids.

Maybe that is why they do it...For quids.

Cheers, Bobj.

 

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.............  and the holding babies has started again.  Why would anyone hand over their baby to a grinning stranger who is desperate to look like a genuine bloke beats me.



Absolutely. A slap with a wet fish is probably more appropriate, not handing over ones baby.
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5 hours ago, Skani said:

They have their lives absolutely dominated by their spouse's  career in politics, they see their federal politician spouses very little because they are away in Canberra  so often and all over the country attending meetings,  they sacrifice a lot to support their  spouses - including copping abuse for their spouse's political allegiances, having to put up with extra security around them and raising their children almost as a single parent.  I think they should be acknowledged.   I wouldn't do it for quids.

Well i reckon that my husband, like many in the services, was only around for approximately 50% of the time our 3 were growing up. His job in the RAF meant for several years he was always away over the Easter and summer school holidays, plus many other deployments.  Yes I even understand the need for security, cars needing to be  searched underneath for explosives, guard dogs etc.  not having your name on the Electoral roll because of IRA concerns. Didn’t get much better when he became a commercial pilot, but that’s the nature of his job and many many others. So many of us have been part time wives, but luckily I wasn’t expected or needed to further his career. Funnily enough the person I was with before I married became about the youngest labour MP, while we were together, so perhaps I had a lucky escape from public duty, although I never saw him needing the help of who he later married. 

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11 minutes ago, ramot said:

Well i reckon that my husband, like many in the services, was only around for approximately 50% of the time our 3 were growing up. His job in the RAF meant for several years he was always away over the Easter and summer school holidays, plus many other deployments.  Yes I even understand the need for security, cars needing to be  searched underneath for explosives, guard dogs etc.  not having your name on the Electoral roll because of IRA concerns. Didn’t get much better when he became a commercial pilot, but that’s the nature of his job and many many others. So many of us have been part time wives, but luckily I wasn’t expected or needed to further his career. Funnily enough the person I was with before I married became about the youngest labour MP, while we were together, so perhaps I had a lucky escape from public duty, although I never saw him needing the help of who he later married. 

I know the RAF family lifestyle well.  Didn’t see my father daily until he left the service in ‘61.

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On Wednesday, May 01, 2019 at 18:03, Parley said:

ScoMo.

If you're happy with the way Australia is and Rossmoynes original post alluded to being happy with Aus at the moment then Scomo is your man. If Labour get in there's going to be changes that's for sure. Whether it's going to be good or bad only time will tell.

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On Sunday, May 05, 2019 at 17:26, Bulya said:

And the massive national debt the Coalition have racked up 

National debts been rising under all governments for years. The current government and leadership team seem to have a plannto turn it round. Labour don't.

I've never voted Liberal before, been a Labour supporter all my life but times have changed and Labour/Liberal are so close with their policies now. The worry is Labour seem to be listening to the greens too much. At one time it would be Labour fighting for blue collar jobs, mining, heavy industry. Now it seems Liberals are their champions. 

Wierd eh.

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4 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

National debts been rising under all governments for years. The current government and leadership team seem to have a plannto turn it round. Labour don't.

I've never voted Liberal before, been a Labour supporter all my life but times have changed and Labour/Liberal are so close with their policies now. The worry is Labour seem to be listening to the greens too much. At one time it would be Labour fighting for blue collar jobs, mining, heavy industry. Now it seems Liberals are their champions. 

Wierd eh.

Are solar installations and wind farm construction white collar jobs?

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On Monday, May 06, 2019 at 07:19, Skani said:

They have their lives absolutely dominated by their spouse's  career in politics, they see their federal politician spouses very little because they are away in Canberra  so often and all over the country attending meetings,  they sacrifice a lot to support their  spouses - including copping abuse for their spouse's political allegiances, having to put up with extra security around them and raising their children almost as a single parent.  I think they should be acknowledged.   I wouldn't do it for quids.

They also get a decent living, invited out a lot when they don't have to pay and probably could easily afford nannies. I think both leaders have older kids anyway don't they? They might have left home already.

Sooner be the spouse of a leader or politician than the politician themselves.

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1 hour ago, Toots said:

As I can't stand the major parties I will be using my vote for https://animaljusticeparty.org/about/charter/

Good sentiment but as they are unlikely to be in government it will come down to your preferences I suspect.


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2 minutes ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Are solar installations and wind farm construction white collar jobs?

There's plenty of that happening now. Especially solar installations. If we ever make the wind turbines here and not just install foreign made ones then there'll be a few blue collar jobs. Installing them at the moment is pretty specialised.

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There's plenty of that happening now. Especially solar installations. If we ever make the wind turbines here and not just install foreign made ones then there'll be a few blue collar jobs. Installing them at the moment is pretty specialised.



Manufacturing petroleum and coal are also pretty specialised. As one specialised industry declines other specialised ones will take over - the trick as an employee is to upskill, and use transferable skills. If you want to remain stuck in a rut, you are likely to be left behind.
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16 minutes ago, ssiri said:

 

 


Manufacturing petroleum and coal are also pretty specialised. As one specialised industry declines other specialised ones will take over - the trick as an employee is to upskill, and use transferable skills. If you want to remain stuck in a rut, you are likely to be left behind.

 

 

Exactly.  Nobody is standing up for blacksmiths, cartwrights or weavers to name but three.

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Mainframe computers are supposed to be dead too


I want it all, and I want it now.

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1 hour ago, Paul1Perth said:

National debts been rising under all governments for years. The current government and leadership team seem to have a plannto turn it round. Labour don't.

I've never voted Liberal before, been a Labour supporter all my life but times have changed and Labour/Liberal are so close with their policies now. The worry is Labour seem to be listening to the greens too much. At one time it would be Labour fighting for blue collar jobs, mining, heavy industry. Now it seems Liberals are their champions. 

Wierd eh.

The current govt have increased the debt more than all previous govts combined.  That’s impressive 

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1 hour ago, ssiri said:

 

 


Manufacturing petroleum and coal are also pretty specialised. As one specialised industry declines other specialised ones will take over - the trick as an employee is to upskill, and use transferable skills. If you want to remain stuck in a rut, you are likely to be left behind.

 

 

They aren't going away for a long time yet hopefully and Aus already has a very skilled workforce in those areas.

BHP, Woodside, Fortescue, Inpex Rio Tinto are all massive employers and contributors to Australias bottom line.

Perth skyline would be a lot different if it weren't for those companies buildings and WA would be in a sorry state without their taxes and royalties.

Plenty of new graduates will be going into those industries for a long time to come. Good payers too.

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They aren't going away for a long time yet hopefully and Aus already has a very skilled workforce in those areas.
BHP, Woodside, Fortescue, Inpex Rio Tinto are all massive employers and contributors to Australias bottom line.
Perth skyline would be a lot different if it weren't for those companies buildings and WA would be in a sorry state without their taxes and royalties.
Plenty of new graduates will be going into those industries for a long time to come. Good payers too.


So? What are you moaning about? The fact that were things to change WA may be left behind if it doesn’t diversify its economy? And? Dinosaurs get left behind. Those investors in WA, would have to look at other sustainable ways to make money - with time they will. Sadly as happens in Australia, the world will be 20 years ahead before they catch up.

They will change, however, just maybe not in your lifetime.
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On Thursday, May 09, 2019 at 16:28, ssiri said:

 


So? What are you moaning about? The fact that were things to change WA may be left behind if it doesn’t diversify its economy? And? Dinosaurs get left behind. Those investors in WA, would have to look at other sustainable ways to make money - with time they will. Sadly as happens in Australia, the world will be 20 years ahead before they catch up.

They will change, however, just maybe not in your lifetime.

 

Who's moaning? First windfarm I ever saw was in Crete way back. 2nd one was down in Esperance in the early 90's. 

I think you underestimate Australian ingenuity and capability. There are thousands of solar installations in a land that is cut out for it. Aus is right at the forefront of that technology and invests heaps into research. A lot of the money available for research has come and is still coming from companies like BHP and Rio. They know there's changes coming and are putting millions into it.

I don't believe Aus is behind any other nation and in front of most. Maybe they'll even start thinking about nuclear generation. 

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Who's moaning? First windfarm I ever saw was in Crete way back. 2nd one was down in Esperance in the early 90's. 
I think you underestimate Australian ingenuity and capability. There are thousands of solar installations in a land that is cut out for it. Aus is right at the forefront of that technology and invests heaps into research. A lot of the money available for research has come and is still coming from companies like BHP and Rio. They know there's changes coming and are putting millions into it.
I don't believe Aus is behind any other nation and in front of most. Maybe they'll even start thinking about nuclear generation. 



In which case we will expect to see them progressing the green agenda, not lobbying to hold it back.

The political classes should probably be sent the memo. They don’t seem to have got it. The way this motley mob (all sides), are carrying on - making climate change into an albatross (no significant progression on green tech and infrastructure - just procrastination and instincts to keep the status quo going).

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1 hour ago, ssiri said:

 

 


In which case we will expect to see them progressing the green agenda, not lobbying to hold it back.

The political classes should probably be sent the memo. They don’t seem to have got it. The way this motley mob (all sides), are carrying on - making climate change into an albatross (no significant progression on green tech and infrastructure - just procrastination and instincts to keep the status quo going).

 

 

There's a massive difference between progressing green tech and overreacting by just brainwashing kids into going to stop adani rallies. 

I see and hear about plenty of innovation designed to reduce our use of power and manage it more efficiently. There's lots of Aussie companies working in high tech solutions. I expect loads more will jump on the bandwagon and rorts galore, because of the money that's going to get thrown at it and the extra costs for power we are going to have to pay. 

I reckon bigger cost increases if Labor/greens get in.

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There's a massive difference between progressing green tech and overreacting by just brainwashing kids into going to stop adani rallies. 
I see and hear about plenty of innovation designed to reduce our use of power and manage it more efficiently. There's lots of Aussie companies working in high tech solutions. I expect loads more will jump on the bandwagon and rorts galore, because of the money that's going to get thrown at it and the extra costs for power we are going to have to pay. 
I reckon bigger cost increases if Labor/greens get in.



Adani - those who make it their cause celebre (for or against), have missed the bigger points and picture.

The real cost now rather than later is what most who stand to inherit the problems want. They want action now, so their futures are managed and less costly tomorrow. Running away from cost is not the answer.

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22 minutes ago, ssiri said:

 

 


Adani - those who make it their cause celebre (for or against), have missed the bigger points and picture.

The real cost now rather than later is what most who stand to inherit the problems want. They want action now, so their futures are managed and less costly tomorrow. Running away from cost is not the answer.

 

 

Fundamentally politicians don’t wish to play the long game as most of the electorate are like toddlers only interested in short-term gratification.

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1 minute ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Fundamentally politicians don’t wish to play the long game as most of the electorate are like toddlers only interested in short-term gratification.

Well done for insulting every Australian in one go.


I want it all, and I want it now.

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