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wrussell

Skilled visa changes??

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There are still too many people who post on here about migrating with a temp visa, selling up etc. Then get annoyed when people point out it is a temp visa with little or no chance of PR. It worries me that they make a massive life decision with the promise from an employer that all will be right. 

These are not young singles either but older with kids, some understand the risk and intend on applying for independent PR some seem oblivious to the pitfalls.

We have seen people on the forums who had several 457s hoping for sponsorship which never came (or their occupation went off the list) and they had to leave.  Irony is that some of them could have applied for PR independently at the start but didn’t because they believed the employers would sort it and they would save some cash.  They then find they are no longer able to..........

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So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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3 hours ago, MaggieMay24 said:

Although you aren't incorrect, you are looking at it from the perspective of the employer and the employee, while the government is looking at it from the perspective of the Australian labour force.

This ^^^, thank you for not misinterpreting me! 😆🤗

However, I think it also bad for AU labor force for the exact same reasoning. Internally it may sound like a good way to protect the local workforce, but AU is not the only place people look for international work opportunities. Many of those highly desirable enough to be selective, will not select AU... leaving AU with fewer highly desirable candidates and the same number of less desirable, hence a higher percentage of less desirable migrant workers.

13 hours ago, VERYSTORMY said:

First, the 457 never had any defined pathway to PR. Far from it, and if you look through old posts, you will see that exact information being reiterated for years.

I myself arrived on a 457, then had a second 457 with a different employer, so know a little about what the 457 was and wasn't. For example, when I arrived, if you lost your job on a 457, you had 28 days to find another employer. I was one of 12 close friends that arrived within months of each other all on 457. I waved off nearly all of them when their 457's were cancelled. Two of us went on to gain citizenship.

It's possible I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure the 457 did not pose a certain dead end. If things worked out between employer and employee, the visa did not prohibit transition to PR.

I'm not saying people on the 457 weren't vulnerable, I know they were, that hasn't changed under the 482. Everyone on temporary work visas in AU are very vulnerable not just to their work position, but to exploitation. Another reason that the temp visas are poorly designed (exploited labor is bad for the local labor force that presumably is being protected by the temp visa), but separate to the point I was making.

23 hours ago, Ausvisitor said:

It was this statement I didn't agree with -  Regardless of intentions, it is designed to bring in the lowest common denominator.

I look at it as a large numbers game. If you have 4 million people looking at international work opportunities and half are highly desirable and able to be selective, that is your baseline pool. If a country establishishes policy that makes half of those that can be selective go elsewhere, but has little effect on those who can't be selective, you concentrate the pool with the less desirable candidates. So you are more likely to get a less desirable candidate, hence designed towards the lowest common denominator.

It's like standardized testing in school. It's intended to ensure minimums and track variations for investigation, which it does. But it also pitches a lowest common denominator because it takes away from education time in order to teach to the test minimums, inducing a forced normalization. It does what 'intended', and is bad for education.

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5 minutes ago, rammygirl said:

There are still too many people who post on here about migrating with a temp visa, selling up etc. Then get annoyed when people point out it is a temp visa with little or no chance of PR. It worries me that they make a massive life decision with the promise from an employer that all will be right.

You are piggybacking on other misinterpretations. Nobody here is pissing about trying to migrate permanently on temp visa. My point is about how stonewalling PR from temp has a detrimental effect on the talent attracted. It happens regardless of the migration intentions of perspective talent because it is effectively offering a dead end job.

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1 hour ago, Karstedt said:

You are piggybacking on other misinterpretations. Nobody here is pissing about trying to migrate permanently on temp visa. My point is about how stonewalling PR from temp has a detrimental effect on the talent attracted. It happens regardless of the migration intentions of perspective talent because it is effectively offering a dead end job.

If that was the case though I'd never take a job, I've never had a job longer than 12 months (well not in the last 10 years anyway) because I choose to work as a "hired expert" on specific engagements - work wherever in the world the most interesting projects are.

I'm certainly not a second rate employee that has to take these temp gigs because I'm not good enough to get a perm offer, on the contrary I'm so good I don't have to take a perm job - this is the type of person temp visas are designed for.

That said I'm most of the way through my PR process 😉

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Exactly. Many people opt for temp sponsored visas when they could apply for PR independently. There are still PR visas available and employers can opt to sponsor for PR without a temp visa to start. 

This has more to do with the occupation lists and what is available for which visas. 

 

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So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Karstedt said:

You are piggybacking on other misinterpretations. Nobody here is pissing about trying to migrate permanently on temp visa. 

You would be surprised how many do. They want to migrate but are scared to move without a job, or they can’t afford to pay the relocation costs, so they see the temp visa as a way to get around that - which they often live to regret 

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 19/04/2019 at 00:19, Marisawright said:

.....so if an employer in the UK offered you a contract for 4 years, what would you expect them to offer in terms of commitment at their end?  

In the UK after 2 years of temporary employment the employer has to make it permanent. But I do get your point 🙂

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I think 4 years is a reasonable/generous amount of time to be offered a job/contract.  The reality is that many jobs are now temporary/contract/casual and are often only for 12 months or less.  Certainly in Adelaide, in some industries there has been a big shift towards temporary and contract work.

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On 24/04/2019 at 02:19, Ausvisitor said:

If that was the case though I'd never take a job, I've never had a job longer than 12 months (well not in the last 10 years anyway) because I choose to work as a "hired expert" on specific engagements - work wherever in the world the most interesting projects are.

I'm certainly not a second rate employee that has to take these temp gigs because I'm not good enough to get a perm offer, on the contrary I'm so good I don't have to take a perm job - this is the type of person temp visas are designed for.

That said I'm most of the way through my PR process 😉

Did you get the part about large numbers? It's not an individual accusation or claim that 'no' talent would remain interested. It's that a not insignificant portion of more desirable talent is turned off by dead end jobs, while those that can't be choosy are not. The percentage of less desirable talent therefore increases. There will always be plenty of people, and plenty of desirable people, it's a matter of what percentage of desirable people you. If my company hires 1000 people per year and 500 are 'good hires', I don't want to instate a policy that drops that to 400 'good hires' per year. People like you can still fall into the 400, there are plenty, but now I have an extra 100 crap hires to deal with every year.

On 24/04/2019 at 15:34, Marisawright said:

You would be surprised how many do. They want to migrate but are scared to move without a job, or they can’t afford to pay the relocation costs, so they see the temp visa as a way to get around that - which they often live to regret 

I know a lot of people complain about 'failure to transition' from temp work visa. I could get a 482 sponsor tomorrow; but I won't because I'm not one of those people.

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Write CDR RPL can help you in CDR for Australia immigration so that you can go to Australia and work there without any problem.

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On 10/07/2019 at 07:31, Canada2Australia said:

How do you know if your nominated occupation is eligible for PR on a 482? I can't seem to find that information. 

It's exactly the same list as it would be for a 189 - just that because you are transitioning from a temp visa it's technically another visa class

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