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Jeni H

Weighing things up

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Hello 🙂

My husband and I have been talking more and more about moving to Australia. I fell in love with it 18 years ago when I stayed on a working visa at age 21. I also have family there and a lot of friends who have made the move too. It’s always been my dream to emigrate, but life has had other ideas so far. 

However, I am due to begin university here this September, to get my nursing degree. I have already been working in the NHS for 4 1/2 years with an added 6 years of community care experience. I have gone as high as I can now without a degree. 

I am 39 and will be 42 once qualified. My husband is 35, we have a son who is currently 6 and my daughter (from a previous relationship) is currently 14. I understand I need to wait until she reaches 18 before asking her to leave the country, in which time of course a lot can change for her. 

I’m just weighing everything up. I was wondering if anyone has advice? Where to start looking to see if it’s something that could even happen? I don’t want to start the application process only to be told it’s never gonna happen and have my heart broken. If it is something we could do, what sort of financial figures are we roughly talking about? Any advice would be amazing. If it’s not something that could happen for us, then are there any lengthy visas we can apply for, in order to stay longer than a few weeks holiday? 

Any advice would be welcome 🙂 

 

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There isn't a lot you can do until you get your degree. A huge amount can change in three years so it is difficult to say more. The system changes a lot regularly and it is impossible to even say if nurses will be eligible then. 

As for costs, budget about 30k. 

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Posted (edited)

Bear in mind that the cut-off for migrating to Australia, either temporarily or permanently, is 45.   To get a skilled visa as a nurse, I think you need qualifications AND post-qualification experience, so you may find you'll be too old by the time you're eligible.  

What does your husband do?   Could he be the primary applicant?  If so, then it wouldn't matter how old you were.

As for your daughter, if you wait till she's 18 then be careful - you won't be able to include her on your visa unless she stays in full-time education until you've got the visa.  If she starts working, then she won't count as dependent on you, and she won't be eligible.  You might be on thorny ground even then, as they might take the view that she isn't really dependent on you, because she could be supported by her father.  

The bottom line is that it would be dangerous to take amateur advice here on the forums, because your case is complicated.  Get it even slightly wrong and you could scupper your chances of migrating.  Book a consultation with a registered migration agent.  The reputable ones will often give you a free preliminary chat - but if this is important to you, then you shouldn't skimp on the fee.   The right advice could make or break your dream.   Check pinoyau.com or ozimmigration.com.

I agree with VeryStormy about costs.  You've got visa application fees, air fares, temp accommodation when you first arrive, shipping your belongings, setting up your new home, buying a car, etc.  Then you also have to consider that unemployment is about the same in Australia as it is in the UK, so neither of you is likely to walk into a job straight away - you need money to live on for several weeks or months while you job-hunt.  All up the figure of  £30,000 is realistic.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, VERYSTORMY said:

There isn't a lot you can do until you get your degree. A huge amount can change in three years so it is difficult to say more. The system changes a lot regularly and it is impossible to even say if nurses will be eligible then. 

As for costs, budget about 30k. 

Thank you very much for advice, I really appreciate it 🙂

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43 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Bear in mind that the cut-off for migrating to Australia, either temporarily or permanently, is 45.   To get a skilled visa as a nurse, I think you need qualifications AND post-qualification experience, so you may find you'll be too old by the time you're eligible.  

What does your husband do?   Could he be the primary applicant?  If so, then it wouldn't matter how old you were.

As for your daughter, if you wait till she's 18 then be careful - you won't be able to include her on your visa unless she stays in full-time education until you've got the visa.  If she starts working, then she won't count as dependent on you, and she won't be eligible.  You might be on thorny ground even then, as they might take the view that she isn't really dependent on you, because she could be supported by her father.  

The bottom line is that it would be dangerous to take amateur advice here on the forums, because your case is complicated.  Get it even slightly wrong and you could scupper your chances of migrating.  Book a consultation with a registered migration agent.  The reputable ones will often give you a free preliminary chat - but if this is important to you, then you shouldn't skimp on the fee.   The right advice could make or break your dream.   Check pinoyau.com or ozimmigration.com.

I agree with VeryStormy about costs.  You've got visa application fees, air fares, temp accommodation when you first arrive, shipping your belongings, setting up your new home, buying a car, etc.  Then you also have to consider that unemployment is about the same in Australia as it is in the UK, so neither of you is likely to walk into a job straight away - you need money to live on for several weeks or months while you job-hunt.  All up the figure of  £30,000 is realistic.

Thank you for your advice, I really appreciate it. It’s such a shame as I would so much love a better life for us all and to be reunited with family. More and more people are becoming mature students too. But anyways, thank you for taking the time to reply to me. Do you know if there’s a way we could stay short term? ie: a few months? Perhaps that’s something we can aim for instead, at least then I can return and show my children the beautiful country and get to spend decent amount of time with family?  

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My husband doesn’t have anything from the skilled list as he has no qualifications other than the exams he did at school and a basic sports A level he gained at college

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6 minutes ago, Jeni H said:

Thank you for your advice, I really appreciate it. It’s such a shame as I would so much love a better life for us all and to be reunited with family. More and more people are becoming mature students too. But anyways, thank you for taking the time to reply to me. Do you know if there’s a way we could stay short term? ie: a few months? Perhaps that’s something we can aim for instead, at least then I can return and show my children the beautiful country and get to spend decent amount of time with family?  

Plenty of tourist visas allow you to stay for a few months, that shouldn’t be a problem but keeping a kid out of school in UK for such a period seems more problematic. 

Your age is certainly going to be against you and as had been noted on here several times, Australia is quite an ageist country. Talk to an agent about the possibilities for you although none have a crystal ball to be able to say whether nursing will still be on the list then, nor  whether you would have whatever experience may be required by that point - it'd be down to the wire age wise.

Im not sure what you think would constitute a “better life" in Australia - it's just another first world country with all the first world country problems that beset the UK. If something is lacking in your life where you are maybe you can better it by a move somewhere closer. Whatever you do, though, don't put your life on  hold in hopes that you may one day move.

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11 hours ago, Jeni H said:

Thank you for your advice, I really appreciate it. It’s such a shame as I would so much love a better life for us all and to be reunited with family. More and more people are becoming mature students too. But anyways, thank you for taking the time to reply to me. Do you know if there’s a way we could stay short term? ie: a few months? Perhaps that’s something we can aim for instead, at least then I can return and show my children the beautiful country and get to spend decent amount of time with family?  

Quote

Just a note from someone that has lived in Oz for 8 years along with a bag full full of other countries. It isn't a better life. It is a different one, but not better. You still have to do all the mundane things. You still have to work every day. Hence about half of UK migrants return. It has pluses and negatives. The same as anywhere. For example, cities are nice and clean. But, want travel from one city to the other, massive trip. On a par with international from the UK. Hot climate. Great for hitting the beach. Murder for work or sat on a packed commuter train. Which is where you will spend most of your time. 

 

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I’ve been here eighteen months, having moved to be near our daughter, who is our only child. We’ve found it easy because we are retired and the only work we do is babysitting. However, we’ve noticed how hard everyone here seems to work. Observing our daughter and friends, the hours seem long and the holidays shorter. just a subjective view but something to consider. We spent years tossing the idea of moving out here back and forth and I can honestly say we are happy here - but we are aware of the things we have given up to make our new lives happen:  Friends.    Quick trips to interesting European countries.  The money spent making it all happen.   

Good luck with whatever you decide, but like other posters, I’d give some thought to what you think Australia could offer that you don’t already have.

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103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

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Thank you for your comments and advice, and to everyone who has kindly responded. It’s mainly family and friends and the fact that I lived there many years ago and didn’t want to come back and knew I wanted to end up back there one day. I want my husband and children to experience it and they are keen also. There aren’t many family attachments here. We don’t go on any trips to Europe etc as it is so that’s not really an issue. Lots to think about and process. Thank you again everyone 🙂 

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, Jeni H said:

 It’s such a shame as I would so much love a better life for us all and to be reunited with family. More and more people are becoming mature students too. But anyways, thank you for taking the time to reply to me. Do you know if there’s a way we could stay short term? ie: a few months? Perhaps that’s something we can aim for instead, at least then I can return and show my children the beautiful country and get to spend decent amount of time with family?  

I'm wondering which part of my post made you decide migrating is out of the question?   Like I said, your age might be a problem, but that's a might, not a definite.  It might be difficult to take your daughter with you, but if you plan in advance, you might be able to get around it.  

A good migration agent might well tell you that there are ways round it and you have a good chance of migrating.  They are the experts, they know how to make the best of your application.   That said, if you can't afford to consult an agent, you probably can't afford to migrate.  It's an expensive business.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 14/03/2019 at 14:49, Jeni H said:

My husband doesn’t have anything from the skilled list as he has no qualifications other than the exams he did at school and a basic sports A level he gained at college

Were you a nursing assistant and did you do any NVQ?  You might be able to get some time knocked off your degree for prior learning.


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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1 minute ago, ali said:

Were you a nursing assistant and did you do any NVQ?  You might be able to get some time knocked off your degree for prior learning.

I have been an assistant for 10 years, working in a variety of settings and gaining specialist skills but you don’t have to have an NVQ for this so unfortunately the only certificate I have to show I know some of what I’ve done is something called a Care Certificate. But it’s not an NVQ. I currently work in a Respiratory Specialist Nursing Team at a hospital and in a community setting, as a specialist assistant, having come from the Respiratory Physiotherapy Team as a specialist assistant there. But no actual qualification. Only experience. This is why I need to do the degree now, to open up further doors and progress, as I’m as high as I can be without a degree in this country. 

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Just now, Jeni H said:

I have been an assistant for 10 years, working in a variety of settings and gaining specialist skills but you don’t have to have an NVQ for this so unfortunately the only certificate I have to show I know some of what I’ve done is something called a Care Certificate. But it’s not an NVQ. I currently work in a Respiratory Specialist Nursing Team at a hospital and in a community setting, as a specialist assistant, having come from the Respiratory Physiotherapy Team as a specialist assistant there. But no actual qualification. Only experience. This is why I need to do the degree now, to open up further doors and progress, as I’m as high as I can be without a degree in this country. 

They don’t knock any time off a degree without an NVQ or foundation degree. I have neither so am doing the full BA degree in Adult Nursing, which is 3 years. 

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I know doing my degree there would have been little knocked off the degree for nursing assistant, i knew of a paramedic who got credited for an anatomy and physiology unit but it didn’t take any time off the degree it just gave him a more comfortable semester with less units! EN’s joined us in year 2 and had to do 2 full years of study regardless of their knowledge and experience, I thought this was a little tough to be honest particularly those with many years experience and advanced EN qualifications.... my overall advice though is do the nursing degree because you are passionate about nursing, don’t do it for a visa, in 3 years time I wouldn’t be surprised if nursing is no longer on the visa lists,  there’s a lot of nurses here and not as many jobs as there used to be.  Saying that everyone says it’s cyclical so you never know, but just make sure your doing the degree for many other reasons than a visa xxxx

 

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