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juju

6 month stay each year

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hi is there anyone here who decided to not go the permanent parent visa route and decided to visit Australia for 6 months each year, returning to the UK fo the other six months?

Or 5 months there and 7 back in uk? 

Is that allowed by immi? 

thank you in anticipation

juju

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Posted (edited)

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Edited by ramot

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Yes, the 600 visa is specifically for this. 

We had parents of a a couple of few doors down rent the holiday home next to us every summer for years. 

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9 hours ago, juju said:

hi is there anyone here who decided to not go the permanent parent visa route and decided to visit Australia for 6 months each year, returning to the UK fo the other six months?

Or 5 months there and 7 back in uk? 

Is that allowed by immi? 

thank you in anticipation

juju

Years ago my mum did just that whilst waiting for me to be able to sponsor her 143 and then whilst awaiting the 143 grant, the waiting time was much shorter then....so she did this for about  3 or 4 years. 

She basically followed the sun doing the summer in each country. This worked just fine in the short term. I think over time it would become exhausting especially as you age, unless you are one of the lucky ones that gets younger! 😁

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Many years ago my parents did that for 16 years when they retired. They built a granny flat on our block and golfed in perpetual summer until the trip got too onerous and the travel insurance too prohibitive. They arranged for someone to inhabit their house in U.K. every so often to comply with insurance, sometimes having a house sitter all the time. They didn’t have a problem with the NHS but things have cracked down since then but they had their house there and it was their place of residence so I guess it would still be ok for NHS purposes. They considered moving to Australia - they loved it more than I do - but decided they didn’t want to even though I am an only child. 

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Thanks....sounds like your parents enjoyed their retirement! There is so much to think about really , but very valid points re travel insurance and also long haul flights in later life .... 

thank you for the reply 

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, juju said:

There is so much to think about really , but very valid points re travel insurance and also long haul flights in later life .... 

I don't envy parents trying to make the decision. 

If you can solve the problem of where to live while you're in Australia (holiday accommodation for several months every year would be costly), then one solution would be to visit Australia for 3 months every year (which can be done easily on an ordinary tourist visa).  That way you'd definitely retain all your rights to residency in the UK and wouldn't strike difficulties with insurance etc.

I know you're also considering the Parents Visa.  I  can understand the pull of family, but I just want to share a cautionary tale from a friend of mine.

When she and her husband applied for the Parents' Visa, it seemed like an obvious decision and they never questioned it.  Unfortunately, by the time their visa was approved, house prices in Sydney had sky-rocketed.   They had a choice - either live in a rough bogan (chav) suburb, or live outside Sydney.  To get a nice home in a place they could afford, they had to buy two hours' drive from their son's house.  

Before they moved, they had been visiting Australia for two or three months every year, staying with their son.  On their visits, they'd do the school run, babysit the children so their son and his wife could have some "me" time, join in with family outings, etc.  In between, they would Skype.

Now they live in Australia, but they're (obviously) too far away to do the school run. The children are older now, so weekends are busy with school sports, birthday parties, etc.    Two hours each way is too long for a day trip for the kids, so the family rarely visits them.   Realistically, as my friend and her husband get older, they'll start to find the long drive a trial, too, so they worry how much contact they'll have in their old age. 

All in all, my friend sees far less of her grandchildren now than she did when she was overseas!  Although she's a very sociable person, has joined in community activities and has made new acquaintances, she badly misses her home, all the treasured possessions she had to discard to make the move, and her dear friends in the UK - and her husband is finding it even harder than her, as he's fairly shy.   She said to me, "I wish I'd realised there's more to life than grandkids".  

Of course, there are plenty of grandparents who have made the move and are very happy with their choice.  I'm only giving that example because I'm sure there are others, like my friend, who get so focussed on the benefits of being with family, that they forget to consider what they might be giving up, and what the reality of their life in Australia might be.  Only you can decide where the balance lies.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I don't envy parents trying to make the decision. 

If you can solve the problem of where to live while you're in Australia (holiday accommodation for several months every year would be costly), then one solution would be to visit Australia for 3 months every year (which can be done easily on an ordinary tourist visa).  That way you'd definitely retain all your rights to residency in the UK and wouldn't strike difficulties with insurance etc.

I know you're also considering the Parents Visa.  I  can understand the pull of family, but I just want to share a cautionary tale from a friend of mine.

When she and her husband applied for the Parents' Visa, it seemed like an obvious decision and they never questioned it.  Unfortunately, by the time their visa was approved, house prices in Sydney had sky-rocketed.   They had a choice - either live in a rough bogan (chav) suburb, or live outside Sydney.  To get a nice home in a place they could afford, they had to buy two hours' drive from their son's house.  

Before they moved, they had been visiting Australia for two or three months every year, staying with their son.  On their visits, they'd do the school run, babysit the children so their son and his wife could have some "me" time, join in with family outings, etc.  In between, they would Skype.

Now they live in Australia, but they're (obviously) too far away to do the school run. The children are older now, so weekends are busy with school sports, birthday parties, etc.    Two hours each way is too long for a day trip for the kids, so the family rarely visits them.   Realistically, as my friend and her husband get older, they'll start to find the long drive a trial, too, so they worry how much contact they'll have in their old age. 

All in all, my friend sees far less of her grandchildren now than she did when she was overseas!  Although she's a very sociable person, has joined in community activities and has made new acquaintances, she badly misses her home, all the treasured possessions she had to discard to make the move, and her dear friends in the UK - and her husband is finding it even harder than her, as he's fairly shy.   She said to me, "I wish I'd realised there's more to life than grandkids".  

Of course, there are plenty of grandparents who have made the move and are very happy with their choice.  I'm only giving that example because I'm sure there are others, like my friend, who get so focussed on the benefits of being with family, that they forget to consider what they might be giving up, and what the reality of their life in Australia might be.  Only you can decide where the balance lies.

Yes it’s really important to try to consider how things will be when you get older. I’m one of the grandparents who has moved and is very happy with the choice I’ve made BUT there are many things that might come up and bite me on the bum as I get older. The main consideration is, I think, mobility. I currently live  away from Sydney because of house prices but also because I didn’t want to live in Sydney! I’m happy to live two hours away by train from our daughter knowing we can go over to babysit for the day, there’s a bed for overnight stays and we can turn up to all the birthday and Christmas events.   Our daughter grew up at a distance from my parents so we are well aware of the way visits tail off as grandchildren get older ... but we think it’s important to live in the moment and after thirteen years of visiting from the UK it is a delight to be only two hours away.

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103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

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5 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I don't envy parents trying to make the decision. 

If you can solve the problem of where to live while you're in Australia (holiday accommodation for several months every year would be costly), then one solution would be to visit Australia for 3 months every year (which can be done easily on an ordinary tourist visa).  That way you'd definitely retain all your rights to residency in the UK and wouldn't strike difficulties with insurance etc.

I know you're also considering the Parents Visa.  I  can understand the pull of family, but I just want to share a cautionary tale from a friend of mine.

When she and her husband applied for the Parents' Visa, it seemed like an obvious decision and they never questioned it.  Unfortunately, by the time their visa was approved, house prices in Sydney had sky-rocketed.   They had a choice - either live in a rough bogan (chav) suburb, or live outside Sydney.  To get a nice home in a place they could afford, they had to buy two hours' drive from their son's house.  

Before they moved, they had been visiting Australia for two or three months every year, staying with their son.  On their visits, they'd do the school run, babysit the children so their son and his wife could have some "me" time, join in with family outings, etc.  In between, they would Skype.

Now they live in Australia, but they're (obviously) too far away to do the school run. The children are older now, so weekends are busy with school sports, birthday parties, etc.    Two hours each way is too long for a day trip for the kids, so the family rarely visits them.   Realistically, as my friend and her husband get older, they'll start to find the long drive a trial, too, so they worry how much contact they'll have in their old age. 

All in all, my friend sees far less of her grandchildren now than she did when she was overseas!  Although she's a very sociable person, has joined in community activities and has made new acquaintances, she badly misses her home, all the treasured possessions she had to discard to make the move, and her dear friends in the UK - and her husband is finding it even harder than her, as he's fairly shy.   She said to me, "I wish I'd realised there's more to life than grandkids".  

Of course, there are plenty of grandparents who have made the move and are very happy with their choice.  I'm only giving that example because I'm sure there are others, like my friend, who get so focussed on the benefits of being with family, that they forget to consider what they might be giving up, and what the reality of their life in Australia might be.  Only you can decide where the balance lies.

A lady bought the plot of ground across from me in Geelong. She had gone to Australia to be closer to her daughter. Built her unit, landscaped the garden , all settled, her daughter promptly upped and moved to Queensland. She said she wasn’t going to keep following her daughter having made this move so sold the unit and went back to the UK. God knows how much that whole debacle cost!

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Thanks so much for these replies .... some very good advice. There is always that thought that once you’re there , your children may relocate ! 

Thanks 

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When we retired we did exactly what we wanted to do. We are all different and have led different lives, and have different ideas of what life in retirement means to us.

We had lived overseas and had to decide where to live. If back to the UK, move back to our old village, at least 2 hours in  different direction to each of our 3? Move near our married son where we had never lived? He could turn round months later saying got a great new job we are off. 

We weren’t programmed to live our retirement through our children and grandchildren.

Adventure beckoned and we moved to Australia on our own 16 years ago. I appreciate we perhaps struck lucky choosing the Sunshine Coast, but we have made so many friends here, love our life with no regrets. You have to be prepared to make the effort if you are going to succeed in a new country, it isn’t easy or quick to settle, you must also realise that you have to make a life of your own, not just depend on your family. Being with them is a bonus. 

Housing is expensive in popular areas, but Sydney prices can compare with London, and realistically could you afford London?

I have to add that 2 of ours followed us to Australia, which is lovely but was unexpected. Our only 2 grandchildren are in UK, we go most years for several months, we love them dearly, but accept that we chose to live in a different country, so time with them is precious, but we are living our life where we want to be.

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Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

A lady bought the plot of ground across from me in Geelong. She had gone to Australia to be closer to her daughter. Built her unit, landscaped the garden , all settled, her daughter promptly upped and moved to Queensland. She said she wasn’t going to keep following her daughter having made this move so sold the unit and went back to the UK. God knows how much that whole debacle cost!

This is an interesting point.  I have often wondered how much parents who want to emigrate have thought about this.  They also need to bear in mind that it is very expensive to move house here, much more so than in the UK.   I know our children have their own lives and there is a risk in following them, however, do you think that the children have some sort of responsibility towards their parents once they have moved to follow them?   After all, they must have encouraged the move and sponsored them.  I find myself in a similar situation now.  It was mainly our son-in-law who drove the move and our daughter actually said to us she only wanted to move if we and her brother could also go.  So we had a grand plan for all of us to emigrate to Queensland where I have a sister and family.  On arrival here sil was offered a job in WA and so that's where they were when we arrived.  They were in the process of building so we thought they were pretty settled.  This all fell through and they went to work in Africa so we moved to Qld to be near family here.   Although they are now back in WA their next move is uncertain. I know they have to go where the work is and my daughter has to go with her husband but  I will probably end up on my own here now as my husband is terminally ill.  Yes, my sister and family are here but they have their own lives and are still working so we don't actually see them that often. So I am seriously considering moving back to the UK as I have always been a bit homesick, although I don't really have anyone there, our son is in Europe.  I am beginning to wish I had never hear of Australia.  I would not have moved here if I had known how things would turn out.

Edited by KBear
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23 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

A lady bought the plot of ground across from me in Geelong. She had gone to Australia to be closer to her daughter. Built her unit, landscaped the garden , all settled, her daughter promptly upped and moved to Queensland. She said she wasn’t going to keep following her daughter having made this move so sold the unit and went back to the UK. God knows how much that whole debacle cost!

I wonder just how often this sort of thing happens.

My Mum loved and looked forward to her holidays here but never had any thought of actually moving here permanently.  She had very good friends and a hectic social life in Scotland and was also very close to her sister there.  At one point none of her 'children' lived in the UK so she did a lot of travelling around visiting us in different countries and she enjoyed that immensely but Scotland was where she was very happy and content.

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37 minutes ago, KBear said:

This is an interesting point.  I have often wondered how much parents who want to emigrate have thought about this.  They also need to bear in mind that it is very expensive to move house here, much more so than in the UK.   I know our children have their own lives and there is a risk in following them, however, do you think that the children have some sort of responsibility towards their parents once they have moved to follow them?   After all, they must have encouraged the move and sponsored them.  I find myself in a similar situation now.  It was mainly our son-in-law who drove the move and our daughter actually said to us she only wanted to move if we and her brother could also go.  So we had a grand plan for all of us to emigrate to Queensland where I have a sister and family.  On arrival here sil was offered a job in WA and so that's where they were when we arrived.  They were in the process of building so we thought they were pretty settled.  This all fell through and they went to work in Africa so we moved to Qld to be near family here.   Although they are now back in WA their next move is uncertain. I know they have to go where the work is and my daughter has to go with her husband but  I will probably end up on my own here now as my husband is terminally ill.  Yes, my sister and family are here but they have their own lives and are still working so we don't actually see them that often. So I am seriously considering moving back to the UK as I have always been a bit homesick, although I don't really have anyone there, our son is in Europe.  I am beginning to wish I had never hear of Australia.  I would not have moved here if I had known how things would turn out.

They probably give very little thought as a rule. Why would they, they are moving to be with family, I don’t think I would imagine that the family would then leave me after all that money and effort. It must be awful. Obviously I’m wiser now!

 I feel for you. I hope your husband is getting good care and is comfortable and you have some support. Good luck with whatever you decide, it’s often hard to know what the right decision is. Sending a hug! I can’t find the emoji!

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5 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

They probably give very little thought as a rule. Why would they, they are moving to be with family, I don’t think I would imagine that the family would then leave me after all that money and effort. It must be awful. Obviously I’m wiser now!

 I feel for you. I hope your husband is getting good care and is comfortable and you have some support. Good luck with whatever you decide, it’s often hard to know what the right decision is. Sending a hug! I can’t find the emoji!

Actually we thought about it quite a lot.  Probably because we’ve moved around a bit ourselves we were very much aware of the way a great job can come up and you might want to take it even if it means a big move. We wouldn’t have decided to move over if our daughter hadn’t had a child, but figured she was less likely to move during the baby years. The potential for our daughter to move was one of the factors influencing our decision to live two hours away. Not just house prices then, but a need to have our own lives and make our own friendship networks that are totally seperate. 

The truth is, there is no easy answer. Had our daughter moved to somewhere a bit closer we wouldn’t haves considered following, but that 24 hour flight is just going to get harder.  Everyone is different and we all find our own solutions, imperfect as they may be ... although I think it’s easier if you have a big budget.

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103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

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16 minutes ago, Fisher1 said:

Actually we thought about it quite a lot.  Probably because we’ve moved around a bit ourselves we were very much aware of the way a great job can come up and you might want to take it even if it means a big move. We wouldn’t have decided to move over if our daughter hadn’t had a child, but figured she was less likely to move during the baby years. The potential for our daughter to move was one of the factors influencing our decision to live two hours away. Not just house prices then, but a need to have our own lives and make our own friendship networks that are totally seperate. 

The truth is, there is no easy answer. Had our daughter moved to somewhere a bit closer we wouldn’t haves considered following, but that 24 hour flight is just going to get harder.  Everyone is different and we all find our own solutions, imperfect as they may be ... although I think it’s easier if you have a big budget.

I think being more of a seasoned traveller helps as you know opportunities can come knocking and people move on, as you have yourself.

It might also be the difference between you as the parent saying we will move to be closer and understanding the risk and the child saying move to be with me, as in that case the parent might expect to keep family close as they have been asked to move, if that makes sense?????

Don’t have an answer, so many factors involved that differ for everyone. But food for thought for those that haven’t considered what they will do if their family move on.

Are you settling in well yourself @Fisher1?

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On 16/03/2019 at 17:42, KBear said:

  I know our children have their own lives and there is a risk in following them, however, do you think that the children have some sort of responsibility towards their parents once they have moved to follow them?   After all, they must have encouraged the move and sponsored them.

My gut instinct is to say yes - it seems the height of callousness for someone to uproot their parents from their home and drag them halfway round the world, only to abandon them.  However, on reflection, I don't think it's that simple.

Firstly, I wonder how often the move is driven by the parents, not by the children?  In your case, KBear, it's clear your daughter really wanted you to come - but from looking at the parents' thread, it seems to me that it's more often the grandparents desperate to be close to their grandchildren. 

My first mother-in-law was a kind, warm-hearted woman but she was totally smothering.  We moved to another town two hours away just to get some peace.  Even so, she and my FIL visited us most weekends, always unannounced, and just assumed they could stay for one or two nights. We never had kids but I dread to think what it would've been like if we had. It never occurred to me that they might follow us to Australia and thank goodness, it didn't occur to them either.   But what could we have said, if they'd wanted to?   "No please don't come, we don't want you taking over our lives again"?  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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21 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

I think being more of a seasoned traveller helps as you know opportunities can come knocking and people move on, as you have yourself.

It might also be the difference between you as the parent saying we will move to be closer and understanding the risk and the child saying move to be with me, as in that case the parent might expect to keep family close as they have been asked to move, if that makes sense?????

Don’t have an answer, so many factors involved that differ for everyone. But food for thought for those that haven’t considered what they will do if their family move on.

Are you settling in well yourself @Fisher1?

We have acquired a group of friends who have all come over to be near children ... including one I “met” on here!  After 18 months we feel more settled every day, but again, having moved around a bit in the past we were very aware of the need to get out and meet people ASAP. “Join everything” is our general rule of thumb and it seems to be working so far!

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103 visa application lodged February 2013. 143 visa application submitted January 2016. Police checks and form 80 submitted February 29th 2016. Visa granted April 4th 2016.

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20 minutes ago, Fisher1 said:

We have acquired a group of friends who have all come over to be near children ... including one I “met” on here!  After 18 months we feel more settled every day, but again, having moved around a bit in the past we were very aware of the need to get out and meet people ASAP. “Join everything” is our general rule of thumb and it seems to be working so far!

Good for you! Glad it is falling into place. Yes I think your past experience is invaluable and also makes you self sufficient in terms of a social group, not so reliant on family. After such an arduous visa process it must be a relief! 😀

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