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simmo

Michael Jackson songs banned

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I always thought MJ was weirdly childlike and was never comfortable watching him around children.
I don’t understand the way some parents push their children into situations with celebrities that they would never do if this was just a guy who lived down the road, ie. Who’d send their kids to a sleepover with Dave the truck driver who lives at number 42??
But between him and some of the things that have gone on as a result of the metoo movement, there are some dangerous precedents being set too like it seeming acceptable to accuse people who cannot defend themselves and publicly destroying reputations before any trial is held.
I’m hoping that what comes out of all this is that people learn that speaking up at the time is not something to be afraid of.
Whilst I know many lives have been ruined or affected by being the victim of some form of abuse, there seems to be a rise in people whose lives have been ruined by being accused and we really have no idea whether they did anything wrong. It doesn’t sit well with me

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Maybe start a topic about the'metoo' movement separately?

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Maybe start a topic about the'metoo' movement separately?

My post was about Michael Jackson....just happened to draw a comparison to Metoo ....
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On 08/03/2019 at 06:30, Captain_Tor said:

 I have to question, at what point did trial by media replace our judicial system?

Good question - but it's happening more and more often.
This is a similar response to Javid's actions wrt to the Begum issue: government bodies/regulators are now taking the populist route. 
Previously, Begum would've come back and been given a fair trial, but public response changed that.
Imho, this also happened with this latest aircraft crash with the 737 Max.  We should be waiting for the official response, as we have previously, but that takes too long these days and so we are going for the loudest opinion, irrespective of whether it's right or wrong.  I worry that by the time the facts come out, no one will care.

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4 hours ago, unzippy said:

Good question - but it's happening more and more often.
This is a similar response to Javid's actions wrt to the Begum issue: government bodies/regulators are now taking the populist route. 
Previously, Begum would've come back and been given a fair trial, but public response changed that.
Imho, this also happened with this latest aircraft crash with the 737 Max.  We should be waiting for the official response, as we have previously, but that takes too long these days and so we are going for the loudest opinion, irrespective of whether it's right or wrong.  I worry that by the time the facts come out, no one will care.

They would certainly care if they didn''t ground potentially deadly aircraft and next week another couple of hundred killed.

Your approach was followed for the first crash but 2 in 5 months No.

Javid is following the law. No one wants another Manchester. Keeping the public safe is the first priority.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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They would certainly care if they didn''t ground potentially deadly aircraft and next week another couple of hundred killed.
Your approach was followed for the first crash but 2 in 5 months No.
Javid is following the law. No one wants another Manchester. Keeping the public safe is the first priority.



To keep the public safe, keep crimes/terrorists/assets under MI5 scrutiny - right under the thumb

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1 hour ago, ssiri said:

 

 


To keep the public safe, keep crimes/terrorists/assets under MI5 scrutiny - right under the thumb

 

 

I agree but the purse strings will have to be loosened quite a lot for the staff to do that effectively, so now we have populist decision making reinforced by Austerity.

 

 

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Not sure it was ‘trial by social media’ that grounded 737 maxes more so than the general desire not to risk more lives until there was certainty around safety.... 

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I know a bit about this.

Air France AF447 - airmanship skills (ie. poor pilot training) and an airline that didn't/doesn't update its aircraft... what could go wrong!? I used to point out that the last three major hull loses by Western Carriers were all by Air France (Concorde at Paris {https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_France_Flight_4590}, A340 at YYZ {https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_France_Flight_358} and the A330 into the Atlantic). Summary:- piss poor pilot actions

Lion Air - airmanship skills with a poor understanding/explanation of an enhanced safety system (MCAS). The same problem arose on previous sectors, the crew dealt with it. This would have been written into the aircraft's tech log. (Plus it also being a written down drill in the pilot's procedure manual; maybe just follow your training!?). If you're curious, the runaway trim drill would (did previously) have solved this issue. Summary:- piss poor pilot actions

Ethiopian - harsh judgement on Lion Air? Maybe. This one - possibly, but definitely not if it's the same issue. 

Imagine - you drive a Mercedes 3-Series; they start blowing up and you die in a fiery furnace if you brake too hard, but if you put it into sport mode then it doesn't. If Mercedes called you previously and informed you of this, would you remember 5 months later? In November last year, Boeing adjusted its procedures to include the parameters experienced by the Lion Air flight through an Airworthiness Directive (something that was sent to every Aviation Authority worldwide plus all the Airlines that operated B737MAX). Basically, if auto trim doesn't work the way you want it to, put it in manual (cutout). Imagine: you're on a motorway but when you put the cruise control on you accelerate uncontrollably, would you a) keep the cruise control on, but press the brake pedal repeatedly or, b) turn it off? BTW, they didn't introduce this procedure, they just added extra reasons to use it. To me it's that (painfully) simple. Summary:- piss poor pilot actions

MCAS - this is probably a contributory factor, but none of these accidents were solely caused by this issue. They were largely caused by poor pilot skills (if same issue on Ethiopian). The reasons why are probably numerous, but I would say the largest is cost; training pilots costs a lot of money, keeping them well trained isn't cheap either. If you have the "safest form of travel" and aircraft "basically fly themselves", then why waste money on simulators/briefing etc!? MCAS existed within the flight control systems on the previous gen B737, and has existed on Airbus forever - do they all crash 12mins into flight? Imagine: you add ABS to a car braking system - you inform buyers but don't go into too much depth. That is/has-been/may-well-change Boeing's mantra.

TL;DR? You know we have different standards of driving world wide - the same applies to flying. I know of check rides (simulator checks, evaluation flights) not too far away, that are heavily prescribed - you know the next issue, removing the shock value and so achieving a high pass percentage - winner! My pilot mate's company is/has been heavily revising this. Basically, now you depart without knowing it's a Rejected Take Off, Minor issue or Engine Fire, which gives a more realistic shock value/failure rate. It has increased the failure rate, and hence cost, but it certainly does make them better aviators. This makes the airline safer, but doesn't do anything for their blood pressure. (And they still have: fail 6-monthly check ride + retrain (1or2 sim sessions) + fail re-test = sacked, which equals even more blood pressure issues!  )

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Just to add - a fascinating article about EgyptAir 990 showing the shockingly disparate ways different cultures handle airline safety https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2001/11/the-crash-of-egyptair-990/302332/

When my Etihad captain buddy was still living here and telling me war stories, it was abundantly clear that the local culture took precedent in terms of training - for example, Malaysian pilots were taught by rote, and to never, ever, ever do anything for themselves if they could help it. 

My mate was a Pilot rather than a pilot and liked nothing more than to stick-fly when the occasions either arose, or was to be enjoyed. Malaysian pilots on the other hand would have the autopilot on ASAFP after takeoff and would not budge from that being best.

I don't really see a problem with having the training beaten into you - the issue is when events arise that require a bit of creativity they wouldn't be like rabbits in the headlights.

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1 hour ago, unzippy said:

Imagine - you drive a Mercedes 3-Series; they start blowing up and you die in a fiery furnace if you brake too hard, but if you put it into sport mode then it doesn't. If Mercedes called you previously and informed you of this, would you remember 5 months later? In November last year, Boeing adjusted its procedures to include the parameters experienced by the Lion Air flight through an Airworthiness Directive (something that was sent to every Aviation Authority worldwide plus all the Airlines that operated B737MAX). Basically, if auto trim doesn't work the way you want it to, put it in manual (cutout). Imagine: you're on a motorway but when you put the cruise control on you accelerate uncontrollably, would you a) keep the cruise control on, but press the brake pedal repeatedly or, b) turn it off? BTW, they didn't introduce this procedure, they just added extra reasons to use it. To me it's that (painfully) simple. Summary:- piss poor pilot actions
 

In your two examples:

1) I would never drive the car again and would expect it to be fixed or get my money back. Summary - Dangerously Piss poor design and manufacture

2) a) I would expect the cruise control to disengage when using the brakes, b) I would also expect cruise control to work as it should, c) How would I know it's the cruise control that is at fault and not something else. Summary - Dangerously Piss poor design and manufacture

In both these cases I would at least expect that the manufacturer would issue a recall and stop selling them until the safety defect is rectified, if both did not happen I would expect the government to step in and do it for them.

To blame pilot error for an inherent fault in design is wrong.

 

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Also nothing to do with Michael Jackson.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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