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laura160882

Help with emigrating

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Hi. Can anyone give me any advice. Long story short, after years of debating and consideration me and family are 100% certain that we want to move to Australia. I am a child protection social worker with 5 years experience and my husband is a bricklayer with over 20 years ex. We have explored a number of different options so are well aware of the issues arising from temporary visa’s. However what I am looking for is the cheapest/quickest way to emigrate preferably with a relocation package and under the auspice of both temp and permanent visas and how to go about searching for such positions. 

I know there probably is no easy solution as it all seems fairly complex But thought it may be worth asking as someone may be able to share some knowledge with me! 

Thanks everyone, Laura 

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Emigration is neither quick nor cheap these days. There was a time when ACT used to go over to UK every couple of years for child protection workers - the ones they brought in had usually gone home by the next time they went. Haven't heard that they're still doing it but the guy then in charge used to like his trips back to Ireland on business every couple of years.

Like many positions in Australia, be careful what you are offered if, indeed, you are ever offered anything whilst overseas. The general rule of thumb is that they will put you in a place that nobody else wants to live - often about as far from the migrant dream as you can get.

Really, the best way is to see if your skills are on anyone's list and apply for PR if you can and in the meantime save up a lot of money because you're going to haemorrhage it in the process. Then once you are in country, apply for positions where you think you might want to live.

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Hi there,

Congrats on making your first enquiries! 

Have you tried LinkedIn or approaching recruiters directly? 

My other half went premium  on LinkedIn (not for Australia though, we had never considered Australia) and was approached within a few days. That said it is a totally different occupation to yours.

Definitely do your research and if you can get PR straight away go for it, otherwise have a look at being sponsored but the ideal scenario is to be on the medium list as this is the only sponsorship that has a pathway to PR. There are also some fees to consider in relation to schools if you have children but dependant on salary nothing unmanageable and they don't need to be paid up front.

Take your time and do lots if research and be wary of those on here that channel the negative energy, you learn to ignore them (mostly).

Take care and enjoy the journey!

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If u find a quick and cheap way, let us all know !

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, laura160882 said:

Hi. Can anyone give me any advice. Long story short, after years of debating and consideration me and family are 100% certain that we want to move to Australia. I am a child protection social worker with 5 years experience and my husband is a bricklayer with over 20 years ex. We have explored a number of different options so are well aware of the issues arising from temporary visa’s. However what I am looking for is the cheapest/quickest way to emigrate preferably with a relocation package and under the auspice of both temp and permanent visas and how to go about searching for such positions. 

I know there probably is no easy solution as it all seems fairly complex But thought it may be worth asking as someone may be able to share some knowledge with me! 

Thanks everyone, Laura 

Not sure who would be the main applicant but another thread has the skills assessment forsocial workers as blowing outto more than 30 weeks I think it said! So if using your skills you would want to get assessment under way asap. You can’t lodgean EOI until you have that.

Some of the states sponsor social workers, Victoria was, notsure if they still are but you could check the skills lists. You would probably get a job easy enough as child protection social work has high turnover due to the nature of the job. I’m not a social worker but others have said that social work is “behind” the uk so you may need to be prepared for that. Others might say “different”.....

I know nothing of bricklaying! 

Sorry it’s not first hand experience.

 I think lots on here would love a quick, cheap way to migrate but it seems to be a cash cow for government and their approved assessors.

Your best bet may be  to consult a registered migration agent for a free assessment. Might help with a plan.

Have a search of the forum, lots of social work threads that might help you.

Good luck

ETA: one user said theirskills assessment was $1800 for social work!

Edited by Amber Snowball
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Posted (edited)

There's no cheap way to migrate, I'm afraid.

No employer is going to sponsor someone for a permanent visa these days, because the process takes so long.  No employer can afford to wait twelve months or more to fill a vacancy!    Twenty or thirty years ago, qualified staff were so scarce, employers sometimes had no choice - and anyway, the process was much faster. Not now.  Employers will settle for a poorly-qualified local rather than wait months for an overseas applicant.

You can get sponsorship from a state for a permanent visa, but that doesn't come with a job or a relocation package.  The only advantage of a state sponsorship is that the requirements are lower than for the 189 visa (which lets you work anywhere in Australia), so you have more chance of success.

The temp visa is the only option where you'll get your air fares paid there and back, and perhaps a relocation package  - but the difficulty is finding an employer willing to take you on  Recently, the government closed down the old temp visas and introduced a new one, the TSS, which makes the whole process more complicated and expensive for the employer.  Not surprisingly, many employers are now reluctant to sponsor because it's all too hard.    I can only suggest that you keep an obsessive eye on Seek.com.au, and perhaps try writing to prospective employers on spec.

One thing you need to consider - when you are ready to transition at the end of the contract, you still need to meet all the criteria for PR, including the fact that you still need to be under the age threshold.  

You say you're familiar with the downsides of the temp visa so I won't dwell on those. I urge you to take a look at the threads on the 186 visa to see how stressful and uncertain the process of "transitioning" from the temp visa to PR can be.   It's very far from guaranteed that you'll be successful in getting PR at the end of the contract, so you need to plan accordingly.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 05/03/2019 at 19:35, mallan82450 said:

Hi there,

Congrats on making your first enquiries! 

Have you tried LinkedIn or approaching recruiters directly? 

My other half went premium  on LinkedIn (not for Australia though, we had never considered Australia) and was approached within a few days. That said it is a totally different occupation to yours.

Definitely do your research and if you can get PR straight away go for it, otherwise have a look at being sponsored but the ideal scenario is to be on the medium list as this is the only sponsorship that has a pathway to PR. There are also some fees to consider in relation to schools if you have children but dependant on salary nothing unmanageable and they don't need to be paid up front.

Take your time and do lots if research and be wary of those on here that channel the negative energy, you learn to ignore them (mostly).

Take care and enjoy the journey!

Thank you for your reply. Laura

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