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Nandini Millar

Warm clothes

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2 hours ago, WayneM said:

It's easy, dinner is what you eat at lunchtime.
 

In my neck of the woods, lunch is what you eat at lunchtime.....and dinner and tea are both used for the evening meal (depending on how posh or casual you are feeling.  🙂)

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19 hours ago, WayneM said:

It's easy, dinner is what you eat at lunchtime.

Tea, is context dependant, and means either your evening meal, or a big mug of cha

When I was growing up, dinner was in the middle of the day and supper was in the evening.  When our posh cousins came to stay they called it lunch in the middle of the day and dinner in the evening.  😄

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20 hours ago, WayneM said:

It's easy, dinner is what you eat at lunchtime.

Tea, is context dependant, and means either your evening meal, or a big mug of cha

It's breakfast lunch and dinner 😂😂😂 

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18 minutes ago, Toots said:

When I was growing up, dinner was in the middle of the day and supper was in the evening.  When our posh cousins came to stay they called it lunch in the middle of the day and dinner in the evening.  😄

To me I say breakfast then lunch and evening meal as dinner 😂😂 it's always a debate in my family. My husband says tea time and I say it's dinner 🤣🤣 tea is normally understood as cup of tea hehe 

Edited by Nandini Millar
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17 hours ago, Skani said:

In my neck of the woods, lunch is what you eat at lunchtime.....and dinner and tea are both used for the evening meal (depending on how posh or casual you are feeling.  🙂)

Lunch at lunch time is such a good explanation thank you 😂😂 👍👍👍

Edited by Nandini Millar

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2 hours ago, Toots said:

When I was growing up, dinner was in the middle of the day and supper was in the evening.  When our posh cousins came to stay they called it lunch in the middle of the day and dinner in the evening.  😄

I'm with you on this Toots, when i was growing up dinner was eaten around 12 to 1 pm and when at school we had ''dinner ladies'' over the break time so teachers got their break. Tea was eaten at tea time when we got home from school and supper was a light snack an hour before bedtime..

 Cal.

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If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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3 hours ago, Nandini Millar said:

Lunch at lunch time is such a good explanation thank you 😂😂 👍👍👍

Ah, but if you grew up eating dinner in the middle of the day, you called it dinnertime. "Lunchtime" was a word we'd never heard of!

"Dinner" is always the main meal of the day, no matter when it's eaten.  

Traditionally, the majority of the population in the UK always ate their main meal in the middle of the day, so it was called "dinner".  Then at night, we'd have "high tea", which was a lighter meal.   

The upper classes, on the other hand, were more likely to follow the European habit of having their dinner in the evening and eating "luncheon" in the middle of the day.  

I think one of the reasons it changed was the fact that people often can't get home in the middle of the day to eat dinner now, like they used to.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I thought it was more a north/south thing?

Or is it the upper classes lived in the south? 😉

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56 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Ah, but if you grew up eating dinner in the middle of the day, you called it dinnertime. "Lunchtime" was a word we'd never heard of!

"Dinner" is always the main meal of the day, no matter when it's eaten.  

Traditionally, the majority of the population in the UK always ate their main meal in the middle of the day, so it was called "dinner".  Then at night, we'd have "high tea", which was a lighter meal.   

The upper classes, on the other hand, were more likely to follow the European habit of having their dinner in the evening and eating "luncheon" in the middle of the day.  

I think one of the reasons it changed was the fact that people often can't get home in the middle of the day to eat dinner now, like they used to.

My grandmother and her friends used to invite each other to afternoon tea.  Wow!  On the occasions when I was staying with Granny that was a real treat.  Lovely little sandwiches and all home made little scones and cakes.  Now it's a treat to go to a hotel for afternoon tea.

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1 hour ago, unzippy said:

I thought it was more a north/south thing?

Or is it the upper classes lived in the south? 😉

It seems to be debated, but I'm pretty sure the midday dinner was common in places like the West Country and Wales too, so not just north/south.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I thought it was more a north/south thing?
Or is it the upper classes lived in the south? 
I thought the same. When I was in South esp London I never heard of dinner time during the day and tea time for evening meal. Its only when I moved to Manchester I started to learn about this new way. What do you call in Australia the meal times? I guess breakfast might be still call the same but don't know about the other 2 debatable terms hehe. I know brunch though

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7 minutes ago, Nandini Millar said:

I thought the same. When I was in South esp London I never heard of dinner time during the day and tea time for evening meal. Its only when I moved to Manchester I started to learn about this new way. What do you call in Australia the meal times? I guess breakfast might be still call the same but don't know about the other 2 debatable terms hehe. I know brunch though emoji3.png

Ah,but you're talking about now.  I'm talking about how it got started many years ago.   These days, younger people all over the country are more likely to have dinner in the evening.

Australians have breakfast lunch and dinner.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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5 hours ago, unzippy said:

I thought it was more a north/south thing?

Or is it the upper classes lived in the south? 😉

I didn’t i initially want to say but  I have never had dinner during the day. I know my place!!!!

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Ah,but you're talking about now.  I'm talking about how it got started many years ago.   These days, younger people all over the country are more likely to have dinner in the evening.
Australians have breakfast lunch and dinner.
Haha yeah I know. My husband is from the north and we always have this topic but lesser it's lovely to know about all these thank you

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I didn’t i initially want to say but  I have never had dinner during the day. I know my place!!!!
Hehe me too. When I was a student in Manchester University I worked park time and they said it's my dinner time(break time for lunch to me) I instantly looked up to the sky to check how dark it has gone it's in my head dinner is evening meal
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Next burning dilemma. Cup of Tea, is it milk in first or tea in first?

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46 minutes ago, ramot said:

Next burning dilemma. Cup of Tea, is it milk in first or tea in first?

Tea first.

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1 hour ago, ramot said:

I didn’t i initially want to say but  I have never had dinner during the day. I know my place!!!!

That's because you are a posh southerner ramot.  😉 😄

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8 minutes ago, Toots said:

Tea first.

Milk

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7 minutes ago, Toots said:

That's because you are a posh southerner ramot.  😉 😄

I would agree with you but as I have moved so much if I actually have no idea where I come from. Posh nomad perhaps !!?

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I'm a baby boomer and my mother was English.   She always referred to it as a singlet.  This is the Oxford English Dictionary definition - so it must have been common in the UK in the past:
singlet      NOUN

1.  British.    A sleeveless garment worn under or instead of a shirt; a vest.



That’s really interesting. I never ever knew that. I think it definitely must have been back in the day
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5 hours ago, aconcannon said:

 


That’s really interesting. I never ever knew that. I think it definitely must have been back in the day emoji848.png

 

Soccer is an English origin term for Football as well, it's just that over time we realised all other forms of ball sports are secondary so Football is football. 🙂


PR (100) granted 12 Nov 2018, validation Trip Feb 2019, planning to move to Perth Sep-Oct 2019!

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13 hours ago, Jon the Hat said:

Soccer is an English origin term for Football as well, it's just that over time we realised all other forms of ball sports are secondary so Football is football. 🙂

Not here in God’s Country it isn’t!  

Edited by Bulya
Wrong word
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