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Hello! 

I have just joined your lovely forum and have had a good look around. I have dreamt about making the move to Oz for at least a decade! And I've finally managed to convince the hubby that it is a good idea!! (I hope I'm not wrong 😉 )

We are just starting our in-depth research now so I know we are a while away from the big move. We are thinking of relocating to Perth, however this would be dependant on the availability of jobs for us both.

We also have 4 children (ages 6, 8, 11 and 13) so at least 2 of them will be teens when we move. Has anyone else successfully made the move with teens? Any tips on making the process easier for them?

I know it can take a while before you are in invited to apply for your visa after submitting your EOI so would you recommend submitting asap just in case? My concern is that it all happens to quickly and we won't have time to complete our research - I know this is unlikely, but I'm just being cautious! Perhaps it would be better to wait until we've done all our research before submitting the EOI?

Thank you for your time and I look forward to reading your replies 😄

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I think you have to have all your skills test and english test done before you put in the eoi, so I’d get going with that. I think the process can be a bit of a long slog, ANMAC are not that quick from what I gather. If you are going for the skilled independent visa higher points get called up first. Have you done a points estimate? 

Good luck and welcome!

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Do we still need the English test with UK passports? I thought we didn't need that if we could prove we've been in an English speaking country through school? 🤔

We score 85 for the visa, is that still fairly low?

Thank you for your reply 😊

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Most people need the english test for visa points.

85 is really high! Most people on here seem to be around the 60 -75. 

It’s been a long time since I applied and the system was different then! I don’t know a great deal about it tbh. 

Others will be along to advise who know far more than me. 🙃

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When you say ‘we’ score 85 points can you clarify. 85 is high without English and over claiming can lead to refusal. Best to post how you added your points up so people can advise. 

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So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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I just hae

9 hours ago, Mamma Midwife said:

I have dreamt about making the move to Oz for at least a decade! And I've finally managed to convince the hubby that it is a good idea!!

I have to say, this sentence strikes dread into my heart.

Please, please, please be honest with yourself.  Is he really, truly keen to move to Australia, or have you nagged/browbeaten him into submission?  

The first few months after arriving in Australia are difficult, expensive and stressful, and there will be times when you wonder if you did the right thing - but your dream will get you through it.  If you have a reluctant partner, he will hate you for dragging him to a foreign country, thousands of miles from his family, friends and familiar routine - and even though things improve, he may never get over that initial "culture shock".   

We've seen too many marriage breakups on these forums as a result, so please make sure he's truly on board and not just "doing it to please you".  Some people (for instance, people who are very close to family or very set in a routine) are just not suitable for migration.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I convinced my ex husband to move here - he didn’t really want to but did to please me. He was miserable here and We split up in Aus and we both stayed in Aus - he has now met an Aussie and loves it here and says he’ll never leave lol we would have split if we had stayed in UK too. If you have a good marriage, are happy and want it to work it will work anywhere and if you don’t and Aus separates you then you probably wouldn’t have lasted anyway. IMO. 

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37 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

I just hae

I have to say, this sentence strikes dread into my heart.

Please, please, please be honest with yourself.  Is he really, truly keen to move to Australia, or have you nagged/browbeaten him into submission?  

The first few months after arriving in Australia are difficult, expensive and stressful, and there will be times when you wonder if you did the right thing - but your dream will get you through it.  If you have a reluctant partner, he will hate you for dragging him to a foreign country, thousands of miles from his family, friends and familiar routine - and even though things improve, he may never get over that initial "culture shock".   

We've seen too many marriage breakups on these forums as a result, so please make sure he's truly on board and not just "doing it to please you".  Some people (for instance, people who are very close to family or very set in a routine) are just not suitable for migration.

Exactly.  This has big red flags all over it.  I’d put money on it that there will be trouble down the track 

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Hello Mamma midwife. 

I’m in the process of emigrating to Perth (hopefully early March but waiting on visas) and am an obstetrician. I’ve got a Consultant post at KEMH (Kind Edwards Memorial Hospital) in central Perth. I did a fellowship there 2013-15 and loved it. It’s the tertiary women’s hospital for all of WA and is a fantastic place to work, with great teamworking. I’ve just had a look on the recruitment website and it looks like they have a recruitment pool at the moment (they usually do). Even in you’re not ready to apply for a job yet, it might be worth enquiring.

http://jobs.health.wa.gov.au/page.php?pageID=160&windowUID=0&AdvertID=220392

There are also a number of other public  hospitals that you could work in eg Joondalup, Fiona Stanley, Osborne Park, SJOG Midland as well as the private hospitals. I haven’t worked there, but have friends/ colleagues who love it. 

Im actually going over on a 482 (4 year) visa sponsored by the health service. I don’t know if they will offer this for midwifery positions, but it may be worth enquiring, then you could apply for PR once there, unless you prefer the lengthier application time to get everything in order for an emigration. 

Good luck with it all. Maybe I’ll get to work with you in the future! 

Alex x

Edited by Flossy82
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7 hours ago, rammygirl said:

When you say ‘we’ score 85 points can you clarify. 85 is high without English and over claiming can lead to refusal. Best to post how you added your points up so people can advise. 

Agree. Unless points for english have been claimed without doing the test. Are you aware @Mamma Midwife that you have to do the test to claim points, you can’t claim them because you are a native speaker. Only thing I can think of, I can’t remember seeing anyone with 85 points recently because of the see saw of gain points for experience but lose points for age thing. Unless the OP has really hit the sweet spot!

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4 hours ago, Flossy82 said:

Hello Mamma midwife. 

I’m in the process of emigrating to Perth (hopefully early March but waiting on visas) and am an obstetrician. I’ve got a Consultant post at KEMH (Kind Edwards Memorial Hospital) in central Perth. I did a fellowship there 2013-15 and loved it. It’s the tertiary women’s hospital for all of WA and is a fantastic place to work, with great teamworking. I’ve just had a look on the recruitment website and it looks like they have a recruitment pool at the moment (they usually do). Even in you’re not ready to apply for a job yet, it might be worth enquiring.

http://jobs.health.wa.gov.au/page.php?pageID=160&windowUID=0&AdvertID=220392

There are also a number of other public  hospitals that you could work in eg Joondalup, Fiona Stanley, Osborne Park, SJOG Midland as well as the private hospitals. I haven’t worked there, but have friends/ colleagues who love it. 

Im actually going over on a 482 (4 year) visa sponsored by the health service. I don’t know if they will offer this for midwifery positions, but it may be worth enquiring, then you could apply for PR once there, unless you prefer the lengthier application time to get everything in order for an emigration. 

Good luck with it all. Maybe I’ll get to work with you in the future! 

Alex x

I hope you have researched the issues with a 482. As you are aware, it is temp visa. There is no guarantee of PR from it and lots of things can occur to prevent someone gaining PR down the track such as the occupation being removed. You may think this is unlikely, but actually the government has stated it wants to see medical occupations removed. 

There are financial implications as well, for example, WA is one of the state's that charges for education to people on temp visas. Then there are the partners who can find it very difficult to find work as employers are rightly nervous of hiring someone whose visa isn't in their own hands (main visa holder loses their job and the partner may have to leave the country) 

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8 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I just hae

I have to say, this sentence strikes dread into my heart.

Please, please, please be honest with yourself.  Is he really, truly keen to move to Australia, or have you nagged/browbeaten him into submission?  

The first few months after arriving in Australia are difficult, expensive and stressful, and there will be times when you wonder if you did the right thing - but your dream will get you through it.  If you have a reluctant partner, he will hate you for dragging him to a foreign country, thousands of miles from his family, friends and familiar routine - and even though things improve, he may never get over that initial "culture shock".   

We've seen too many marriage breakups on these forums as a result, so please make sure he's truly on board and not just "doing it to please you".  Some people (for instance, people who are very close to family or very set in a routine) are just not suitable for migration.

 Completely agree with this.  OH and I both wanted to move to Australia, but I became very unhappy there after a number of years for various reasons, and even though we moved back, our marriage didn't survive. We are now living apart pending divorce, and he sees the kids for a few hours every other weekend (his choice, not mine). I can't imagine the extra pressure that would have been added if one of us had been uncertain in the first place. I don't and can't ever know if we'd have split if we'd never gone to Australia, but it is an incredibly stressful process that is very emotionally (and financially) costly. I never would have thought I'd find myself in this position, but here I am. Thankfully we split once we were back in the UK. I shudder to think what might have happened had we split whilst we were still living there.

Just make sure you're both on the same page.

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9 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I just hae

I have to say, this sentence strikes dread into my heart.

Please, please, please be honest with yourself.  Is he really, truly keen to move to Australia, or have you nagged/browbeaten him into submission?  

The first few months after arriving in Australia are difficult, expensive and stressful, and there will be times when you wonder if you did the right thing - but your dream will get you through it.  If you have a reluctant partner, he will hate you for dragging him to a foreign country, thousands of miles from his family, friends and familiar routine - and even though things improve, he may never get over that initial "culture shock".   

We've seen too many marriage breakups on these forums as a result, so please make sure he's truly on board and not just "doing it to please you".  Some people (for instance, people who are very close to family or very set in a routine) are just not suitable for migration.

Yup, this, in a nutshell!

Even the strongest of marriages can founder when one loathes what the other loves! 

We have seen on here though the odd occasion where the dream turns into a nightmare for the instigator when the other partner thinks it’s the best thing since sliced bread and so won’t let their partner move on with their kids to U.K. but keep them trapped in a place they come to loathe with the shackles of The Hague Convention.

One man’s dream is another man’s nightmare! I always shudder when the “it’s been my dream to ...” is produced as the reason for a move (too much WDU & H&A will do that to you lol)

Edited by Quoll
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10 hours ago, rammygirl said:

When you say ‘we’ score 85 points can you clarify. 85 is high without English and over claiming can lead to refusal. Best to post how you added your points up so people can advise. 

I say 'we' as in my family, myself, my husband and our children. I used the following website to determine our eligible points:

 https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-independent-189

Is it the right one to use? (I was recommended it on another forum).

I have just re checked our points and I actually misread one of them 🤦‍♀️ I have a masters but I've just realised that it's only relevant if it was obtained in Aus 😞 I guess I'll be doubt that English test after after all!! 😭😭😭

As for any concerns about my marriage, thank you! I think we will be good... but then I would say that, wouldn't I? We have already moved away from all family and friends to one if the channel isles. I know it's not the other side of the world but it has been a test!

I've not 'brow beaten' my husband.... at least I don't think I have 🤔🤔 jk 

I have researched the cost of living and compared it to where we are currently living - which is ridiculous by the way!! And I have presented my findings to him which are that we can have a better way of living in Aus than where we are currently. We have zero chance of ever finding a property here that suits our needs, a small two bed flat costs around £500k and we really need a 5 bed which will cost millions. And he agrees, it makes sense on paper. I've made him fully aware that if he's not happy then we won't go, or we'll come back. 

That brings me on to the Hague Convention.... I've read about it, watched the video and told him in full about it - he thought that was me telling him I might leave him *note to self - don't have these conversations when he's had a few beers while watching the football!!* 🙈😂

I have then explained that I am more than happy for us to sign a contract before we go, if we go, to avoid any issues in the future. I know others have been duped by the empty promise of return which is what I'd want to avoid!

We are a strong family unit and we have been through some awful times. Our family motto is 'as long as we have each other, we have everything' so I know we will be ok. We always make it through difficult times and are closer for it. 

 

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58 minutes ago, Quoll said:

One man’s dream is another man’s nightmare! I always shudder when the “it’s been my dream to ...” is produced as the reason for a move (too much WDU & H&A will do that to you lol)

Sorry to be dense, but can you please elaborate on WDU and H&A? Thank you 😊

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7 hours ago, Flossy82 said:

Hello Mamma midwife. 

I’m in the process of emigrating to Perth (hopefully early March but waiting on visas) and am an obstetrician. I’ve got a Consultant post at KEMH (Kind Edwards Memorial Hospital) in central Perth. I did a fellowship there 2013-15 and loved it. It’s the tertiary women’s hospital for all of WA and is a fantastic place to work, with great teamworking. I’ve just had a look on the recruitment website and it looks like they have a recruitment pool at the moment (they usually do). Even in you’re not ready to apply for a job yet, it might be worth enquiring.

http://jobs.health.wa.gov.au/page.php?pageID=160&windowUID=0&AdvertID=220392

There are also a number of other public  hospitals that you could work in eg Joondalup, Fiona Stanley, Osborne Park, SJOG Midland as well as the private hospitals. I haven’t worked there, but have friends/ colleagues who love it. 

Im actually going over on a 482 (4 year) visa sponsored by the health service. I don’t know if they will offer this for midwifery positions, but it may be worth enquiring, then you could apply for PR once there, unless you prefer the lengthier application time to get everything in order for an emigration. 

Good luck with it all. Maybe I’ll get to work with you in the future! 

Alex x

Hello Alex! 

And thank you for your post 😁

I'll certainly look into the link you sent me and see what I can do. Because of our children, we are going for the PR visa. I don't fancy paying the elevated school fees as this will detract from the reason of moving. But it's definitely a good option if you don't have children in the equation!

I hope we do get to work together in the future, O&G and Midwifery is a small world so I'm sure we will at some point. 

Congratulations on your Consultant post by the way!! 🎉 such a big achievement 😊

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14 minutes ago, Mamma Midwife said:

Sorry to be dense, but can you please elaborate on WDU and H&A? Thank you 😊

Sorry, a lot of our readers have “the dream” because they’ve grown up watching Home and Away or Wanted Down Under and think that is what Australia is all about. In essence, they’re both first world countries with all the pluses and minuses that brings with it. Neither is inherently better than the other and moving to a foreign country on the other side of the world requires not “a dream” but a sense of adventure, a considerable dose of self reliance and well over the average selfishness (not meant in a pejorative sense, rather a survival sense) along with a willingness to take risks and not get hung up if it doesn’t work. If someone isn’t 100% committed and 110% raring to go, then it’s likely to flounder.

oh, and please don’t start watching H&A, it’ll sap your brain!

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33 minutes ago, Quoll said:

Sorry, a lot of our readers have “the dream” because they’ve grown up watching Home and Away or Wanted Down Under and think that is what Australia is all about. In essence, they’re both first world countries with all the pluses and minuses that brings with it. Neither is inherently better than the other and moving to a foreign country on the other side of the world requires not “a dream” but a sense of adventure, a considerable dose of self reliance and well over the average selfishness (not meant in a pejorative sense, rather a survival sense) along with a willingness to take risks and not get hung up if it doesn’t work. If someone isn’t 100% committed and 110% raring to go, then it’s likely to flounder.

oh, and please don’t start watching H&A, it’ll sap your brain!

Ah I see, thank you! I did used to watch H&A (I feel good now that I know what that is 😂😂😂) as a child but haven't watched it in years.... I'll keep away 😉

As for WDU, I'm usually in work when it's on but I do enjoy seeing the houses of I ever do get to watch it... it's the only bit I've ever been interested in.

My dream encompasses all you have described. My responsibility now is to not pressure my husband into following it and allowing him to make up his own mind. He is the more cautious one out of the two of us 🤔🤔🤔

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4 hours ago, Mamma Midwife said:

Ah I see, thank you! I did used to watch H&A (I feel good now that I know what that is 😂😂😂) as a child but haven't watched it in years.... I'll keep away 😉

As for WDU, I'm usually in work when it's on but I do enjoy seeing the houses of I ever do get to watch it... it's the only bit I've ever been interested in.

My dream encompasses all you have described. My responsibility now is to not pressure my husband into following it and allowing him to make up his own mind. He is the more cautious one out of the two of us 🤔🤔🤔

I am sorry, but this is still a massive red flag "my dream". 

I don't think you are fully appreciating what we are saying. There are massive issues at stake. One of the big ones is your husband goes along with it all and seems happy, but isn't. This is stupidly common. He feels like he can't say anything as you are living your dream, but he isn't. To him, it isn't "right". That can slowly build to resentment and eventually major issues. Be 100% certain he is as in love with the move as you are. 

Do not assume you will be financially better off. Throw in the mix that the process is likely to cost 30k and that it can take a while to get set up. 

It is very easy to say, oh, we just move back. While the legal side of things is correct, the practical is far from it. We did it, we found ourselves at Heathrow with me, my wife, the dog and a suitcase each and nothing else or anywhere to live and pretty much no money. Because in reality, moving around the world is stupidly expensive no which way you go. 

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Yes. I do fully appreciate what you are saying. I am not a naive and uneducated person. I am not asking for ways in which to convince my husband to go along with what I want. He needs to make this decision for himself and be 100% happy with it. And if he's not happy with it then we don't go. Also, before going anywhere we'd have contingency plans in place and access to savings.

I am on this forum to gather information about a possible move down under and for support from fellow immigrants, not to be berated for calling the desire to relocate 'my dream'. What I was saying in my reply above was that my dream isn't just a whim, it is an adventure filled with risks, stress, uncertainty, potential unhappiness etc, I accept that fully and completely understand my husband's thought process. 

I do appreciate messages of concern, but I feel there is no need to keep going on about it when that is not what I am asking for help with. 

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Just a thought but I think some midwives have had to do some supervised practice before being able to register. There is a thread on here somewhere I’m pretty sure. I’ll try and find it. Might need thinking about as it can be hard to get somewhere to take you on and provide that.

Bummer about the points.

There are lots of threads on here about IELTS and PTE the 2 english tests and some information on studying for them as they are a bit tricky apparently.

🙂

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Just now, Amber Snowball said:

Just a thought but I think some midwives have had to do some supervised practice before being able to register. There is a thread on here somewhere I’m pretty sure. I’ll try and find it. Might need thinking about as it can be hard to get somewhere to take you on and provide that.

Bummer about the points.

There are lots of threads on here about IELTS and PTE the 2 english tests and some information on studying for them as they are a bit tricky apparently.

🙂

Yes, I think it usually does come with the need for supervision because of a lack in experience with caseloading. I am hopeful that I'll be ok though as caseloading was a formal part of my degree and, although I don't work in a caseloading model, due to the small nature of the unit I work in I have had the opportunity to follow women through from the antenatal period, labour and delivery and also postnatally. Well have to see what comes bank from the skills assessment. 

I've just read the thread comparing the IELTS and PTE and was thinking I'd go with the PTE. I did also look at the Cambridge test but haven't heard much about that one. Have you done the English test? Which one would you recommend?

😁

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1 minute ago, Mamma Midwife said:

Yes, I think it usually does come with the need for supervision because of a lack in experience with caseloading. I am hopeful that I'll be ok though as caseloading was a formal part of my degree and, although I don't work in a caseloading model, due to the small nature of the unit I work in I have had the opportunity to follow women through from the antenatal period, labour and delivery and also postnatally. Well have to see what comes bank from the skills assessment. 

I've just read the thread comparing the IELTS and PTE and was thinking I'd go with the PTE. I did also look at the Cambridge test but haven't heard much about that one. Have you done the English test? Which one would you recommend?

😁

Sorry no I didn’t need it. Moved 13 years ago so could just claim the points back then! How things change!

@Wonderingaloud  is a midwife in Australia and might see this.  There is a thread in the visa chat section called “midwives in Australia” where there is some chat about the supervision. Sorry I’m on a small ipad and can’t get the links into the text! 😬

From reading on here people go for the PTE if they just need it for points I think, but it’s horses for courses I suppose, which format suits you better.

Good luck!

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Thank you 😁 that's fantastic! I'll head over and search for the thread now. Haha yes times have changed a lot! But it's probably for the best for the country in the long run 😉 thank you 😊

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