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Hi there,

My parents have arrived in Oz and planning to apply for the 804 Aged parent visa as they meet with the requirements, a couple of questions, if/when the bridging visa is granted are they entitled to medicare reciprocal health cover ( They are UK Passport holders) also can they buy a house on the 804 Bridging visa does anyone know?

Many thanks in advance

 

Michael

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They are entitled to reciprocal cover. They can buy a house under the rules for foreign investors.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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15 minutes ago, Michael Johnson said:

Thanks so much Maria, was worried for a bit there, have a great day

There are other problems with being on a bridging visa which I hope you are aware of?    The waiting time for that visa is 30 years, which means they'll probably never get it (if they are still alive they will likely fail the medical!).   

That means they will have to live out their days in Australia on a bridging visa, which means they are permanently classed as "non-residents" - even if they buy a property!    That means they get no access to benefits or aged care.   Their UK pensions will be frozen at whatever rate it is now. 

If they get old enough to need access to aged care or home support (which they won't be entitled to in Australia), they won't be able to return to the UK and get assistance there, because they'll have lost their rights to access the NHS and other benefits.  They'll have to re-establish residency before they can get anything. Being a citizen doesn't give you any extra rights. 

There may be other downsides but those are the ones that spring to mind.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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They may also be expected to be repatriated should they get really sick and the reciprocal care doesn't cover them or they fail the medical if they're still around when it comes - and Medicare doesn't cover everything. Why do they not get a CPV and meanwhile visit occasionally so that they arrive permanently in security. 

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Not sure how long the wait is now for the 804 visa, but I was really surprised when talking to friends recently  who applied iin 2003 that it only took 5/6 years for them to get PR. So perhaps the onshore 804 is quicker? but Who knows as the onshore 864 CPV have been at a complete standstill for over 2 years, and that was supposed to be quicker!!!

Health is a potential problem, but we, live in Australia on the 410 temporary long term fully self funded retirement visa and have full private health cover as not entitled to Medicare even. As long as you can afford the health cover, all the people we know on the 410 visa, all aged 70 to 80 plus, have had plenty of health problems, but no problems claiming most if not all of the costs back, but the coverisn’t cheap. We pay $11,000 annually for a couple, and it goes up every year, but 2 years ago I had far more than my share reimbursed.

 

I think a major worry is passing the medical for the visa, if it has taken years to get, this doesn’t seem to ever be mentioned, if your visa application is refused, you might have to leave elderly and sick to return to your home country.

Edited by ramot
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1 hour ago, Quoll said:

They may also be expected to be repatriated should they get really sick and the reciprocal care doesn't cover them or they fail the medical if they're still around when it comes - and Medicare doesn't cover everything. Why do they not get a CPV and meanwhile visit occasionally so that they arrive permanently in security. 

Possibly not as the subclass 602 Medical Treatment visa is available for Aged Parent visa applicants who fail the health requirement.

Best regards.

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Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com

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6 minutes ago, Alan Collett said:

Possibly not as the subclass 602 Medical Treatment visa is available for Aged Parent visa applicants who fail the health requirement.

Best regards.

Thanks, thought there was something that covered that. Good to know, the way I’m going I might need that now as waiting for the 143 onshore!!!

Out of interest would it also apply if you have applied for a partner visa, aged 80? Not me but know someone on 410 visa who married an Australian recently.

Always appreciate your help and advice Alan for those on PIO.

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https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/medical-treatment-602

Here's the DoHA web page regarding the Medical Treatment visa.

If the partner visa application was lodged in Australia, yes, I'd expect a 602 visa to be available if the partner visa application is lodged onshore and is refused on health grounds.

Best regards.

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Managing Director, Go Matilda Visas - www.gomatilda.com

Registered Migration Agent Number 0102534; Registered Tax Agent (Australia)

Chartered Accountant (UK, and Australia)

T - 023 81 66 11 55 (UK) or 03 9935 2929 (Australia)

E - alan.collett@gomatilda.com

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1 hour ago, ramot said:

Not sure how long the wait is now for the 804 visa, but I was really surprised when talking to friends recently  who applied iin 2003 that it only took 5/6 years for them to get PR. So perhaps the onshore 804 is quicker? 

Health is a potential problem, but we, live in Australia on the 410 temporary long term fully self funded retirement visa and have full private health cover as not entitled to Medicare even. As long as you can afford the health cover, all the people we know on the 410 visa, all aged 70 to 80 plus, have had plenty of health problems, but no problems claiming most if not all of the costs back, but the coverisn’t cheap. We pay $11,000 annually for a couple, and it goes up every year, but 2 years ago I had far more than my share reimbursed.

I doubt the onshore visa is quicker - most onshore visas take longer to process than their offshore equivalents.   Anyhow, 2003 was 15 years ago, a lot has changed since then (though I know at my age, I'm inclined to think of 2003 as being about five minutes ago!).

I can't speak for the OP but I'd have thought if his parents could afford $11,000+ a year for private health insurance then they would have gone for the Contributory Parent Visa.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Hello,

I can tell you that last year a client received her Aged parent visa after being 10 years in the queue.

You should also consider that they will have to pass a medical examination closer to the grant of the visa- and because it can take about a decade (positive scenario) , if their medical condition wont be not good, they might not be fit to pass these medical examinations and wont be granted their visa.

Good luck,

Moran Shultz

Migration Agent 1795282

 

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4 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I doubt the onshore visa is quicker - most onshore visas take longer to process than their offshore equivalents.   Anyhow, 2003 was 15 years ago, a lot has changed since then (though I know at my age, I'm inclined to think of 2003 as being about five minutes ago!).

I can't speak for the OP but I'd have thought if his parents could afford $11,000+ a year for private health insurance then they would have gone for the Contributory Parent Visa.  

Its us that can afford it, no idea if the OPs parents can.

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1 hour ago, Moran From LifeinAus said:

Hello,

I can tell you that last year a client received her Aged parent visa after being 10 years in the queue.

Yes, but that means they joined the queue in 2007, doesn't it?    How long did people wait for the Contributory Visa when they applied in 2007?   

The processing times have increased dramatically so I think it's irresponsible to tell people about historical successes without making it clear what's happening today.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, ramot said:

Its us that can afford it, no idea if the OPs parents can.

Yes, that's what I meant


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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8 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Yes, but that means they joined the queue in 2007, doesn't it?    How long did people wait for the Contributory Visa when they applied in 2007?   

The processing times have increased dramatically so I think it's irresponsible to tell people about historical successes without making it clear what's happening today.

Indeed. My mum applied for her offshore 143 around that time and it took about 18 months from memory. Certainly not longer than 2 years. So very different times.

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24 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Yes, that's what I meant

My husband wasn’t  as keen as me to apply for the 864, and I swung it by pushing how much our health insurance cost, so we could save on the cost of half the visa, eventually.

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I agree that the processing time is very very long but I don't think it is actually 30 years. There is always the contributory options.

My point was to explain that when a person apply for a visa with such a long processing time, it does need to think about all the consequences.

I agree that it can be vert risky from many reasons but it is up to the applicant to eventually make the decision based on his specify circumstances.

 

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9 minutes ago, Moran From LifeinAus said:

I agree that the processing time is very very long but I don't think it is actually 30 years. There is always the contributory options.

We are talking about the 804 visa. There are no contributory options in the 804 visa, those are completely different visas.    

Here is an article from 2015 which states the queue had gone up to 30 years:  https://migrationalliance.com.au/immigration-daily-news/entry/2015-07-30-year-wait-for-parent-visa-damages-australia-s-international-standing.html

Here is another quote from 2016:  "There are approximately 40 thousand parents on the lower cost visa waiting list for the slower non-contributory visas. With only 1500 visa places offered this financial year, the Department of Immigration and Border Protection says applicants can expect a 30 year wait before visa grant consideration."   https://www.sbs.com.au/radio/article/2016/06/02/settlement-guide-parent-visas-cost-time-and-money

Finally here is an article from 2018, showing that the figure of 30 years is becoming remarkably consistent:  https://www.sbs.com.au/yourlanguage/korean/en/article/2018/05/01/parent-visa-hopes-crushed-australia-demands-sponsors-earn-more

As a professional migration agent, I'd expect you to be aware of these facts.

 

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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