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Perthbum

Land Rover diesels

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99% of the cars they produce are diesel, they say themselves because of the introduction of electric cars they are finished, how is oz going to tackle this problem? When  It’s 200 miles to the local deli?


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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Solar panels on the roof?

I assume you mean LR saying no more diesel development?  I doubt they are going to stop producing the ones they have / Hybrid drive-chains.  

I guess it might mean Australian outback drivers will have less choice in future.


PR (100) granted 12 Nov 2018, validation Trip Feb 2019, planning to move to Perth Sep-Oct 2019!

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1 hour ago, Jon the Hat said:

Solar panels on the roof?

I assume you mean LR saying no more diesel development?  I doubt they are going to stop producing the ones they have / Hybrid drive-chains.  

I guess it might mean Australian outback drivers will have less choice in future.

Are there many LRJ on the roads in Australia. 

LRJ concentrated on diesels I reckon because otherwiee consumption figures were rubbish with their heavy SUV' bodies,  they simply didn't adapt and concentrated on chinese market too much, and now brexit, the perfect storm.

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1 hour ago, BacktoDemocracy said:

Are there many LRJ on the roads in Australia. 

LRJ concentrated on diesels I reckon because otherwiee consumption figures were rubbish with their heavy SUV' bodies,  they simply didn't adapt and concentrated on chinese market too much, and now brexit, the perfect storm.

Not many LR’s here as they’re to unreliable.  

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Before the remoaners come on.

 

Ford and Jaguar Land Rover rue the day when the UK voted to leave the European Union. They now back Theresa May’s withdrawal deal because they would prefer their supply chains to face as little disruption as possible. With the clock ticking towards the 29 March departure date, both companies have warned of the consequences of a no-deal Brexit.

All that said, the job losses announced by the two companies had precious little to do with what’s been going on in the UK over the past two and a half years. No question, Brexit is something they could do without, but it is much less significant than the four big structural issues facing the global automotive sector.

Issue one is the fact that there is a global glut of production. There are too many companies, too many plants and too many models. Squeezed profit margins in an ultra-competitive European market is the reason Ford is closing a plant in France and weighing up whether to continue with a joint venture in Russia.

Issue two is China, which has been a major growth market for JLR (and other companies) but has just announced the first fall in car sales in two decades. Beijing is expected to announce within weeks government-backed incentives to boost consumer demand for cars and for the industry they can’t come soon enough.

Issue three is diesel. Companies invested heavily in diesel as a more climate-friendly alternative to petrol, only to find consumer demand plunging when the VW emissions-testing scandal raised concerns about nitrogen oxide pollution. Nine out of 10 JLR cars are diesel powered.

Issue four is the need to cut costs to invest in the new generation of electric cars, a process that has become even more pressing as a result of Dieselgate. That JLR has announced plans to produce electric drive units in Wolverhampton powered by batteries from Hams Hall in Birmingham helped sugar the pill of job losses. It also showed that there is life after Brexit.

Nothing new in the UK’s adult education failings

The report from the Whitehall department was blunt: Britain’s system of adult education was not up to scratch. Improvements in skills training were needed to help the population cope with rapid technological change and to allow citizens to assess rival political claims.

Those were the findings of the Ministry of Reconstruction’s adult education committee in 1919 and over the past century it is striking – and depressing – to find how little has changed. The latest adult education survey from the Office for National Statistics says some of the most vulnerable people in the UK have the least access to the training and education to boost their career prospects.

Britain’s failure to take lifelong learning seriously has long been a source of economic weakness. Too many workers struggle with numeracy and literacy: higher education doesn’t really prepare students for the future world of work; further education has always been the poor relation of the system. These deficiencies will become even more costly in the age of artificial intelligence.

The 100th anniversary of the 1919 report has been marked by the setting up of a centenary commission that will publish its report on the challenges facing adult education in November. The fact that it will be the latest in a series of high-level studies going back not just to the aftermath of the first world war but to the mid-19th century tells its own story. The problem is not that there has been a shortage of ideas for improving adult education. It is that the many weighty reports have been allowed to gather dust.

Now Europe’s not very happy with China, either

In George Orwell’s 1984 the world is divided up into three superstates – Oceania, Eurasia and Eastasia – two of which were always at war with each other at any one time.

Fiction is now becoming fact. The trade cold war between Washington and Beijing is thawing but now the Europeans have started to turn nasty. Germany’s BDI – an industry lobby group similar to the UK’s CBI – says it is time for Brussels to take a much tougher line with China’s state-dominated economic model.

Among the 54 separate demands, the BDI called for the EU to lobby for the opening up of China’s markets, measures to prevent the theft of Europe’s intellectual property rights and an end to the dumping of cut-price Chinese steel.

European policymakers were quick to condemn Donald Trump’s protectionist stance but seem to have learned lessons from it. Imitation, they say, is the sincerest form of flattery.

 
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Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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2 hours ago, Perthbum said:

Before the remoaners come on.

 

Ford and Jaguar Land Rover rue the day when the UK voted to leave the European Union. They now back Theresa May’s withdrawal deal because they would prefer their supply chains to face as little disruption as possible. With the clock ticking towards the 29 March departure date, both companies have warned of the consequences of a no-deal Brexit.

All that said, the job losses announced by the two companies had precious little to do with what’s been going on in the UK over the past two and a half years. No question, Brexit is something they could do without, but it is much less significant than the four big structural issues facing the global automotive sector.

Issue one is the fact that there is a global glut of production. There are too many companies, too many plants and too many models. Squeezed profit margins in an ultra-competitive European market is the reason Ford is closing a plant in France and weighing up whether to continue with a joint venture in Russia.

Issue two is China, which has been a major growth market for JLR (and other companies) but has just announced the first fall in car sales in two decades. Beijing is expected to announce within weeks government-backed incentives to boost consumer demand for cars and for the industry they can’t come soon enough.

Issue three is diesel. Companies invested heavily in diesel as a more climate-friendly alternative to petrol, only to find consumer demand plunging when the VW emissions-testing scandal raised concerns about nitrogen oxide pollution. Nine out of 10 JLR cars are diesel powered.

Issue four is the need to cut costs to invest in the new generation of electric cars, a process that has become even more pressing as a result of Dieselgate. That JLR has announced plans to produce electric drive units in Wolverhampton powered by batteries from Hams Hall in Birmingham helped sugar the pill of job losses. It also showed that there is life after Brexit.

Nothing new in the UK’s adult education failings

The report from the Whitehall department was blunt: Britain’s system of adult education was not up to scratch. Improvements in skills training were needed to help the population cope with rapid technological change and to allow citizens to assess rival political claims.

Those were the findings of the Ministry of Reconstruction’s adult education committee in 1919 and over the past century it is striking – and depressing – to find how little has changed. The latest adult education survey from the Office for National Statistics says some of the most vulnerable people in the UK have the least access to the training and education to boost their career prospects.

Britain’s failure to take lifelong learning seriously has long been a source of economic weakness. Too many workers struggle with numeracy and literacy: higher education doesn’t really prepare students for the future world of work; further education has always been the poor relation of the system. These deficiencies will become even more costly in the age of artificial intelligence.

The 100th anniversary of the 1919 report has been marked by the setting up of a centenary commission that will publish its report on the challenges facing adult education in November. The fact that it will be the latest in a series of high-level studies going back not just to the aftermath of the first world war but to the mid-19th century tells its own story. The problem is not that there has been a shortage of ideas for improving adult education. It is that the many weighty reports have been allowed to gather dust.

Now Europe’s not very happy with China, either

In George Orwell’s 1984 the world is divided up into three superstates – Oceania, Eurasia and Eastasia – two of which were always at war with each other at any one time.

Fiction is now becoming fact. The trade cold war between Washington and Beijing is thawing but now the Europeans have started to turn nasty. Germany’s BDI – an industry lobby group similar to the UK’s CBI – says it is time for Brussels to take a much tougher line with China’s state-dominated economic model.

Among the 54 separate demands, the BDI called for the EU to lobby for the opening up of China’s markets, measures to prevent the theft of Europe’s intellectual property rights and an end to the dumping of cut-price Chinese steel.

European policymakers were quick to condemn Donald Trump’s protectionist stance but seem to have learned lessons from it. Imitation, they say, is the sincerest form of flattery.

 
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How many times have I railed about the failing of technical education in the UK

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1 minute ago, BacktoDemocracy said:

How many times have I railed about the failing of technical education in the UK

railed?  I blame your age 😉go and have your coco

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Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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24 minutes ago, Perthbum said:

railed?  I blame your age 😉go and have your coco

What is it with you, is that the level of your intelligence, get back in your box

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5 minutes ago, BacktoDemocracy said:

What is it with you, is that the level of your intelligence, get back in your box

image.jpeg.eae5824b4be93bcff938d29d38e853c4.jpeg

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Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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15 minutes ago, Perthbum said:

image.jpeg.eae5824b4be93bcff938d29d38e853c4.jpeg

No nothing is for you

There is going to be a lot less money for the pub trade after brexit 

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10 hours ago, Bulya said:

Not many LR’s here as they’re to unreliable.  

Do Australia make any cars?

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55 minutes ago, simmo said:

Do Australia make any cars?

I don't think so Simmo.  😕

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2 minutes ago, simmo said:

what NONE?

I thought all the car manufacturing plants had closed.  Someone may prove me wrong though.

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10 hours ago, BacktoDemocracy said:

No nothing is for you

There is going to be a lot less money for the pub trade after brexit 

How do you work that one out? we are an internal market.


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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1 hour ago, Toots said:

I thought all the car manufacturing plants had closed.  Someone may prove me wrong though.

pleasse tell me you are not serious mate.


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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1 hour ago, Perthbum said:

pleasse tell me you are not serious mate.

What do you mean by that? I don’t think there are any left now are there?


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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5 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

What do you mean by that? I don’t think there are any left now are there?

I honestly despair sometimes.

Made in Britain
  • MINI – MINI, MINI Clubman and MINI Countryman, in Cowley, Oxford
  • Honda – Civic and CR-V in Swindon
  • Toyota – Auris, Auris hybrid and Avensis in Burnaston, Derbyshire
  • Nissan – Juke, Qashqai, Note and Leaf and Infiniti Q30 in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear
  • Lotus – Elise, Evora and Exige in Norfolk
  • Aston Martin – DB9, Vantage, Rapide, Vanquish, and DB11 in Gaydon, Warwickshire
  • Bentley Motors – Continental, Flying Spur and Mulsanne in Crewe, Cheshire
  • Rolls Royce – Ghost and Wraith in Goodwood, West Sussex
  • Jaguar – F-Pace and XE in Solihull, and F-type, XJ, XF and XE in Castle Bromwich, Birmingham
  • Land Rover – Discovery Sport and Range Rover Evoque in Halewood, Merseyside, and Range Rover, Range Rover Sport and Land Rover Defender in Solihull, West Midlands
  • Vauxhall – Astra at Ellesmere Port and Vivaro van in Luton

Other niche, small volume manufacturers include Westfield, Bristol, Ariel and Noble

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Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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28 minutes ago, Perthbum said:

I honestly despair sometimes.

Made in Britain
  • MINI – MINI, MINI Clubman and MINI Countryman, in Cowley, Oxford
  • Honda – Civic and CR-V in Swindon
  • Toyota – Auris, Auris hybrid and Avensis in Burnaston, Derbyshire
  • Nissan – Juke, Qashqai, Note and Leaf and Infiniti Q30 in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear
  • Lotus – Elise, Evora and Exige in Norfolk
  • Aston Martin – DB9, Vantage, Rapide, Vanquish, and DB11 in Gaydon, Warwickshire
  • Bentley Motors – Continental, Flying Spur and Mulsanne in Crewe, Cheshire
  • Rolls Royce – Ghost and Wraith in Goodwood, West Sussex
  • Jaguar – F-Pace and XE in Solihull, and F-type, XJ, XF and XE in Castle Bromwich, Birmingham
  • Land Rover – Discovery Sport and Range Rover Evoque in Halewood, Merseyside, and Range Rover, Range Rover Sport and Land Rover Defender in Solihull, West Midlands
  • Vauxhall – Astra at Ellesmere Port and Vivaro van in Luton

Other niche, small volume manufacturers include Westfield, Bristol, Ariel and Noble

Toots’ answer was to the question, “do AUSTRALIA make any cars”.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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14 hours ago, Perthbum said:

Nothing new in the UK’s adult education failings

The report from the Whitehall department was blunt: Britain’s system of adult education was not up to scratch. Improvements in skills training were needed to help the population cope with rapid technological change and to allow citizens to assess rival political claims.

Those were the findings of the Ministry of Reconstruction’s adult education committee in 1919 and over the past century it is striking – and depressing – to find how little has changed. The latest adult education survey from the Office for National Statistics says some of the most vulnerable people in the UK have the least access to the training and education to boost their career prospects.

Britain’s failure to take lifelong learning seriously has long been a source of economic weakness. Too many workers struggle with numeracy and literacy: higher education doesn’t really prepare students for the future world of work; further education has always been the poor relation of the system. These deficiencies will become even more costly in the age of artificial intelligence.

Not sure why you'd want to quote this, it describes you precisely.  

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4 hours ago, simmo said:

Do Australia make any cars?

All gone

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1 hour ago, simmo said:

whys that then?

Demographer Bernard Salt blames the "globalisation of manufacturing", or, in other words, learning that it was cheaper to build things overseas and ship them back than to pay Australians to build them here. " We have created jobs and opportunity elsewhere. Certainly in education, certainly in health, certainly in construction. In some respects we are bringing Australian workers out from the drudgery of repetitive factory work, and we're cultivating jobs in the knowledge industries".

I don't know how much of that is bullsh!t

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14 hours ago, simmo said:

Do Australia make any cars?

Yes there are  cars still being made in Australia as well as busses and trucks.

A friend of mine has 2 Bolwell's


I want it all, and I want it now.

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