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Welshy

Looking to emigrate to WA and seeking advice from business owners.

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Hi everyone. 

My wife and I meet the requirements for a business visa and we are looking to emigrate to WA, Perth specifically. I'm looking to connect with other people who've emigrated on the same visa class. 

We know Perth well and having been many times over the years, we have some good friends there, so am not seeking advice on the lifestyle aspect, or the City as such.

Can anyone offer some advice on the application process and also, what were the requirements placed upon you, after your business visa was granted and you took up residence in Oz? Did you get long enough to wrap up your affairs in the UK?

What kind of businesses did you set up when arriving in Australia and how did you go about doing this? I could see myself opening a coffee shop and making a little chain of these, or possibly some kind of online shop or a business that gave us a little bit more of a work/life balance than we have here in the UK.

I'm really looking forward to connecting with people who've done the same and drawing on your experiences, all advice welcome. 

Thanks. :)

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I would strongly recommend you take professional advice from a good agent as these visas are complex with unique benefits and negatives. I would recommend Alan at Go Matilda. 

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From my observations, most of the people on these forums have arrived on skilled, employer-sponsored or parent visas, so I don't think you're going to find much help.

However, I second what VeryStormy says.  I'd say people applying for a business visa need an agent more than any other.  From my limited experience, they're more complex than they look and have all kinds of pitfalls, which are not obvious.  A good agent will be able to answer all your questions and steer you through the process, increasing your chances of success.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 27/12/2018 at 06:52, Marisawright said:

From my observations, most of the people on these forums have arrived on skilled, employer-sponsored or parent visas, so I don't think you're going to find much help.

However, I second what VeryStormy says.  I'd say people applying for a business visa need an agent more than any other.  From my limited experience, they're more complex than they look and have all kinds of pitfalls, which are not obvious.  A good agent will be able to answer all your questions and steer you through the process, increasing your chances of success.

Thank you, yes it seems that a lot of people make the move as skilled independents or sponsored and then seek employment. nothing wrong with that whatsoever, in fact, back in 2008 I booked my Vetasses assessment as an electrician, but in the end for one reason and another I didn't go or pursue it further. 

Looking back I'm glad in a way but I'm 38 now and if we don't do it now the years will keep sliding by and before I know it I'll be 48 and could have had 10 years in the sun at that point if we don't do it now. We are also looking for more of a work/life balance and I find people in Australia more optimistic and positive and I feel they are a product of their environment which is brilliant.

I'm full of positivity since we made the decision to apply for a visa 🙂

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17 minutes ago, Welshy said:

Thank you, yes it seems that a lot of people make the move as skilled independents or sponsored and then seek employment. nothing wrong with that whatsoever, in fact, back in 2008 I booked my Vetasses assessment as an electrician, but in the end for one reason and another I didn't go or pursue it further. 

Looking back I'm glad in a way but I'm 38 now and if we don't do it now the years will keep sliding by and before I know it I'll be 48 and could have had 10 years in the sun at that point if we don't do it now. We are also looking for more of a work/life balance and I find people in Australia more optimistic and positive and I feel they are a product of their environment which is brilliant.

I'm full of positivity since we made the decision to apply for a visa 🙂

Ah the mythical work-life balance.....

Seriously, you need to talk to an agent. Business visas are complex, and require a huge amount of hard work in order to get PR. I know a couple of people who managed it but they ran businesses in the UK for many years beforehand and went into the same line of work (within the retail field) in oz. It was hard work both from the point of view of running the business, and from keeping up with visa requirements. and expensive, but they made it in the end.

As you  don't even seem to have a business plan yet, you do need professional advice. 

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4 minutes ago, Nemesis said:

Ah the mythical work-life balance.....

Seriously, you need to talk to an agent. Business visas are complex, and require a huge amount of hard work in order to get PR. I know a couple of people who managed it but they ran businesses in the UK for many years beforehand and went into the same line of work (within the retail field) in oz. It was hard work both from the point of view of running the business, and from keeping up with visa requirements. and expensive, but they made it in the end.

As you  don't even seem to have a business plan yet, you do need professional advice. 

Thanks for the response. 

It's tricky to have a business plan when we haven't decided on what businesses to operate yet, I don't think that matters in regards to the visa application, it's based on you meeting the requirements (which we do). We've run successful businesses for years now and have the skills required to set up and run businesses in Australia. 

We own a chain or hotels now and other property based businesses, plus some online businesses. I really don't think running a coffee shop or a sandwich bar would be that tricky.

I know a lady who's a good friend of ours who sold her manufacturing business in Yorkshire 11 years ago and then bought a little sandwich shop in Perth, you're targeted on turnover and then you qualify for PR after a period, which she now has, she then sold the sandwich shop.

I've got the details for a good agent based in Perth and I'll be reaching out to him and taking advice and letting him handle it. 

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1 hour ago, Welshy said:

Thanks for the response. 

It's tricky to have a business plan when we haven't decided on what businesses to operate yet, I don't think that matters in regards to the visa application, it's based on you meeting the requirements (which we do). We've run successful businesses for years now and have the skills required to set up and run businesses in Australia. 

We own a chain or hotels now and other property based businesses, plus some online businesses. I really don't think running a coffee shop or a sandwich bar would be that tricky.

I know a lady who's a good friend of ours who sold her manufacturing business in Yorkshire 11 years ago and then bought a little sandwich shop in Perth, you're targeted on turnover and then you qualify for PR after a period, which she now has, she then sold the sandwich shop.

I've got the details for a good agent based in Perth and I'll be reaching out to him and taking advice and letting him handle it. 

Fair enough, sounds like you are aware of the pitfalls then. So many people come on forums like this with no real idea of what  is needed. If you had mentioned at first that you already run a hotel chain and are well versed in how to run large businesses than I would have restricted my comment to just its first line......

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9 minutes ago, Nemesis said:

Fair enough, sounds like you are aware of the pitfalls then. So many people come on forums like this with no real idea of what  is needed. If you had mentioned at first that you already run a hotel chain and are well versed in how to run large businesses than I would have restricted my comment to just its first line......

Sorry, if I wasn't clear about it.

I've also noticed when reading comments in other threads that the Immi department must get so many applications from people trying to 'game' the system, families who've no doubt remortgaged their properties outside of Australia to fund a business 'startup' for one of the kids (who's there on a student visa and claims it's VC capital) 

When I mentioned work / life balance I was being serious, running what we do can be really time consuming and I can't see running a coffee shop or a small chain of coffee shops taking up as much time, early starts yes, but then I'm up at 6am most days anyway, so that doesn't bother me and I'd imagine it would close around 2pm, with staff to open up etc I could see myself spending no more than 2-3 hours a day working in the business which allows far more time to do other things (in the sunshine). 

 

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12 hours ago, Welshy said:

We are also looking for more of a work/life balance and I find people in Australia more optimistic and positive and I feel they are a product of their environment which is brilliant.

I have to laugh at the work/life balance.  Australians work longer hours than people in most of the developed world.  When I was living back in the UK a couple of years ago, I was struck by how much more free time people had.   The difference, really, is in what you do with your time off.  If you're an outdoorsy person and able to cope with the heat/sun, then you'll feel you can make better use of your leisure time.

I do agree about the more positive, can-do attitude of Australians although in my experience, it's not the same over the whole of Australia.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thanks for the reply.

It depends on your perspective. I wouldn’t disagree that many Australians work longer hours than people in the UK.
Does this mean that this would be the case for us? Does it mean we’d make less money? With respect, I’d seriously doubt it.
If you work smart then you can work as often or as little as you want, should the business allow it.

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1 hour ago, Welshy said:

Thanks for the reply.

It depends on your perspective. I wouldn’t disagree that many Australians work longer hours than people in the UK.
Does this mean that this would be the case for us? Does it mean we’d make less money? With respect, I’d seriously doubt it.
If you work smart then you can work as often or as little as you want, should the business allow it.

The longer hours is a statistical fact, but of course it mostly refers to employees, not business owners.  

I see no reason why running a business here in Australia should be any different than running the same business in the UK  - so I find it even less understandable that a business owner would move to Australia for a better work/life balance.  You could open a café or sandwich shop in the UK and achieve the same thing.   The only difference is the weather and what you do with your spare time, and I'm assuming it's those things that you're looking at.

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 31/12/2018 at 21:42, Marisawright said:

The longer hours is a statistical fact, but of course it mostly refers to employees, not business owners.  

I see no reason why running a business here in Australia should be any different than running the same business in the UK  - so I find it even less understandable that a business owner would move to Australia for a better work/life balance.  You could open a café or sandwich shop in the UK and achieve the same thing.   The only difference is the weather and what you do with your spare time, and I'm assuming it's those things that you're looking at.

 

The weather, the culture and the people are important, so is Australias proximity to Asia and the Pacific. We love to travel and from the UK the Pacific Islands are a real trek to get to.

Also in my experience, Australians are very positive and 'glass half full' people, which I really like.

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1 hour ago, Welshy said:

The weather, the culture and the people are important, so is Australias proximity to Asia and the Pacific. We love to travel and from the UK the Pacific Islands are a real trek to get to.

Also in my experience, Australians are very positive and 'glass half full' people, which I really like.

Honestly, they are just people living in another western country. There isrobabbly the same percentage f positive people as in the UK, and oz has a huge problem with disillusioned 20-30 year lds turning t drugs etc. Also the suicide rate in oz is very worrying, and has many roots - including poverty, lack of good jobs, long hours meaning a lack of family life, domestic violence,  working conditions - workplace bullying is endemic in many places.

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1 hour ago, Nemesis said:

Honestly, they are just people living in another western country. There isrobabbly the same percentage f positive people as in the UK, and oz has a huge problem with disillusioned 20-30 year lds turning t drugs etc. Also the suicide rate in oz is very worrying, and has many roots - including poverty, lack of good jobs, long hours meaning a lack of family life, domestic violence,  working conditions - workplace bullying is endemic in many places.

Sorry to read this. I've been to Oz many times and I know we'd be happy there.

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1 hour ago, Nemesis said:

Honestly, they are just people living in another western country. There isrobabbly the same percentage f positive people as in the UK, and oz has a huge problem with disillusioned 20-30 year lds turning t drugs etc. Also the suicide rate in oz is very worrying, and has many roots - including poverty, lack of good jobs, long hours meaning a lack of family life, domestic violence,  working conditions - workplace bullying is endemic in many places.

Sounds like a right sh!thole.

Personally we managed to avoid poverty, suicide attempts and even the long hours with lack of family life.  Never been bullied in my life.  We must be in the minority.

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8 minutes ago, Toots said:

Sounds like a right sh!thole.

Personally we managed to avoid poverty, suicide attempts and even the long hours with lack of family life.  Never been bullied in my life.  We must be in the minority.

I have lost no less than eight Australian friends to suicide in various parts of oz over the last 12 months, and a close friend who works with mental health charities for emergency services says its a really big problem in that service in oz these days, especially amongst police officers. 

A lot of my own self confidence - and in fact a lot of my liking for Australia - was bullied out of me by two bosses in my first job, which was for a major charity. 

All I am saying is that all the issues that affect people in other countries also affect people in oz. Don't go there thinking everyone is happy and smiley all the time They are just orinary people. 

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24 minutes ago, Welshy said:

Sorry to read this. I've been to Oz many times and I know we'd be happy there.

I hope it works for you, just approach it realistically

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6 hours ago, Nemesis said:

I have lost no less than eight Australian friends to suicide in various parts of oz over the last 12 months, and a close friend who works with mental health charities for emergency services says its a really big problem in that service in oz these days, especially amongst police officers. 

A lot of my own self confidence - and in fact a lot of my liking for Australia - was bullied out of me by two bosses in my first job, which was for a major charity. 

All I am saying is that all the issues that affect people in other countries also affect people in oz. Don't go there thinking everyone is happy and smiley all the time They are just orinary people. 

Eight people in 12 months   .....................  that is just awful.  I am very sorry to read that.  I have a couple of volunteer jobs here and do see poverty and hopelessness but there are reasons for that which I won't go into here.  I know about bullying in the workplace but that can happen anywhere.  I was reading that it's pretty bad in the NHS for example.  I wonder what causes the bullying.  I certainly never personally experienced it though I do know we had a manager who was a bit of a horror and caused problems for a couple of my co-workers.  She was a nasty piece of work but in the end she got the push.

Hard to get my head round the fact that charities of all places are rife with bullies.  

Thank goodness I'm retired now and don't have to worry about any office politics now.

Not surprised you are left with a dislike of Australia which is a shame.

 

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10 hours ago, Nemesis said:

All I am saying is that all the issues that affect people in other countries also affect people in oz. Don't go there thinking everyone is happy and smiley all the time They are just orinary people. 

Very true.  It's too easy, when visiting on holidays, to stay in a bubble and not confront the realities of everyday life.  

Australia is like any other developed country.  It's no worse but i certainly don't think it can claim to be any better, either.  Every city has crime-ridden suburbs, people living in poverty, drug problems.  If you're affluent enough to avoid those areas you can avoid most of it - the same as in any other country.  Modern business practices encourage the rise of psychopaths to positions of power, it's the same in businesses the world over. 

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 hours ago, Toots said:

Eight people in 12 months   .....................  that is just awful.  I am very sorry to read that.  I have a couple of volunteer jobs here and do see poverty and hopelessness but there are reasons for that which I won't go into here.  I know about bullying in the workplace but that can happen anywhere.  I was reading that it's pretty bad in the NHS for example.  I wonder what causes the bullying.  I certainly never personally experienced it though I do know we had a manager who was a bit of a horror and caused problems for a couple of my co-workers.  She was a nasty piece of work but in the end she got the push.

Hard to get my head round the fact that charities of all places are rife with bullies.  

Thank goodness I'm retired now and don't have to worry about any office politics now.

Not surprised you are left with a dislike of Australia which is a shame.

 

Usually lack of management skills in my experience. They don't know how to motivate people.

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9 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Very true.  It's too easy, when visiting on holidays, to stay in a bubble and not confront the realities of everyday life.  

Australia is like any other developed country.  It's no worse but i certainly don't think it can claim to be any better, either.  Every city has crime-ridden suburbs, people living in poverty, drug problems.  If you're affluent enough to avoid those areas you can avoid most of it - the same as in any other country.  Modern business practices encourage the rise of psychopaths to positions of power, it's the same in businesses the world over. 

I've lived and worked in Oz, in 2005 I spent a year there, did many things including FIFO from Perth to Yandi. 

I like the culture, weather, peoples 'can do' attitudes and the lifestyle. Really sorry more of you don't seem to feel the same, I'd urge you to spend a few years in the UK and you'll realise what you've got.

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Posted (edited)

double posted.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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41 minutes ago, Welshy said:

I've lived and worked in Oz, in 2005 I spent a year there, did many things including FIFO from Perth to Yandi. 

I like the culture, weather, peoples 'can do' attitudes and the lifestyle. Really sorry more of you don't seem to feel the same, I'd urge you to spend a few years in the UK and you'll realise what you've got.

If you read my post again, I didn't say I was unhappy in Australia.  Having lived in the UK for a year a few years ago, I can see there are pros and cons to both countries.  Like I said, both have poverty, crime and drug problems.  

Which country you prefer is very much a matter of personal preference. For example, personally I prefer Australia to the UK.  However, I wouldn't live in Perth if you paid me.  Whereas one of my friends moved there from Sydney and would never move back.  By the same token, we have many members here who came to Australia, lived for several years, and now prefer the UK.  

Provided you don't come to Australia with an unrealistic dream, as so many regrettably do, you'll be fine.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, Welshy said:

I've lived and worked in Oz, in 2005 I spent a year there, did many things including FIFO from Perth to Yandi. 

I like the culture, weather, peoples 'can do' attitudes and the lifestyle. Really sorry more of you don't seem to feel the same, I'd urge you to spend a few years in the UK and you'll realise what you've got.

Australia kindly refused my husband's visa application so I have spent more time in the UK than in oz in the last couple of years. I feel more alive than I have in the 20 odd years down under. I relate better to the people at home and love the culture, the weather, the friendliness and our new lifestyle

Each to their own. 

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1 hour ago, Nemesis said:

Australia kindly refused my husband's visa application so I have spent more time in the UK than in oz in the last couple of years. I feel more alive than I have in the 20 odd years down under. I relate better to the people at home and love the culture, the weather, the friendliness and our new lifestyle

Each to their own. 

That exactly.   I always say I wouldn't want to be poor in Australia, as a flight somewhere is always on the cards, and never cheap!


PR (100) granted 12 Nov 2018, validation Trip Feb 2019, planning to move to Perth Sep-Oct 2019!

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