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chris63863

How does an international student in Australia make ends meet?

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16 minutes ago, Tulip1 said:

Would be interested to know how all these people did manage to get PR from a WHV, please elaborate 

My daughter as many of her friends is well qualified and in most cases they either had a degree and/or good work experience, rather than an 18 year old just wanting fun in the sun for a year. So they were more employable. I did say this appeared ‘easier’ a few years ago, 6 in my daughter’s case. She had a degree, had worked in several countries, lots of experience and was snapped up originally on a 457 visa. 

Some met their future partners here while on a WHV, 

Hope that helps. I am Obviously not talking in the hundreds, but probably well over 20. 

Have no idea how easy or difficult it is now, but it was viable before.

 

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9 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

Would be interested to know how all these people did manage to get PR from a WHV, please elaborate 

It is possible.  These days you can be up to 30 years old on a WHV, (and it's just gone up to 35)  so you may have a qualification and several years' experience behind you.

People always think of people on WHV's working in casual bar and café jobs, but a lot of them do temp work in offices and retail, doing the same job they did in the UK.  If they're any good, then there's a chance their employer will offer to sponsor them for a 457 (now TSS) and after that, they may apply for PR.

However, none of that will work if their occupation isn't on the lists, and that's the bit that people miss.    Too many people think, "I don't qualify for a PR visa, but I've heard that people can go on a WHV and parlay that into a permanent visa, so I'll try that".    It's not the case.  The people who achieve that transition are usually people who could've stayed in the UK and still qualiified for PR - doing the WHV just gave them a chance to move to Australia a bit earlier. 

I remember having a receptionist working for me once.  She was very good, and my boss (who was based in Singapore) was very impressed.  She asked him if the company would sponsor her and he said yes, for sure - and then passed it on to me to arrange.  Of course, I had to tell her there was absolutely no chance because she had no qualifications and her job wasn't on the list. 

To this day, I think she's still convinced that she could have been sponsored, and that I deliberately scuppered her chances for some reason.  She based that view on the fact that "lots of people" at the backpacker hostel had managed to get sponsorship before, though strangely she'd never met any of them or knew any of their names or what kind of sponsorship they got.  

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I spoke to a friend recently about this. He trained as a chef in Australia as an international student and has ended up with PR. He laughed that he couldn't do it now. It cost him a fortune in any case and caused a great deal of stress going from one visa to another. He moved over about 8 years ago.

I think there are a few too many buttercups on here. The reality is that a lot of the students who come here hope to live here permanently, they can be Poms or from anywhere else. Why would you spend a far greater amount of money than it would cost to do the course in your home country to achieve a qualification. If you completed teacher training here, you would need to get it assessed against British standards in the UK. I'm presuming it would be the same in say nursing. Many courses have units that wouldn't be relevant in another country due to different laws, environment and procedures. So if you were looking to work in your home country after qualification you've added a hurdle. There are wealthy Asian students in particular who come over and this is also a fact, I had it at Uni in the UK. Dad has sent them to the UK to learn about Western culture before joining the family business, whatever it is... I totally agree the vast majority of students fall into one of the two categories, having recently worked in conjunction with a University I have met students who would come under either category!

  • Like 1

AITSL assessment complete-09/10/2014 | IELTS L8.5, R8, W8.5, S8.5. -13/12/2014 | EOI submitted 07/01/2015 (65) invite 09/01/2015 | 189 Visa applied - 10/01/2015 | Meds -20/02/2015 | PCC-08/03/2015 | Visa granted! - 20/03/2015.

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On 28/12/2018 at 05:10, Tulip1 said:

Would be interested to know how all these people did manage to get PR from a WHV, please elaborate 

I originally arrived in Australia on a WHV. This was purely for a gap year - I had no intention of staying past that year.

During that time - I found a  job on a temp contract for 6 months - to top up my funds.

I performed well in that role that they offered to sponsor me on a 457. Which they did.

I have currently lodged my PR application through 186 TRS stream. I am awaiting the decision from the department.

Although my Visa has not been approved yet - there is a clear route to PR from WHV for some. Your occupation is required to be on the List and you need the relevant experience / degree.

There may have been a slice of luck in my story - right place at the right time possibly.

 

 

 


Occupation: ICT Customer Support Officer
Birth Country: LR
Stream: ENS TRT
Number of applicants: 2
ENS 186 Visa and Nomination applied:  March 2018

VISA GRANTED - 13/03/19

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1 hour ago, boo-yaa said:

Although my Visa has not been approved yet - there is a clear route to PR from WHV for some. Your occupation is required to be on the List and you need the relevant experience / degree.

There is, however as you point out, you must have a skill that's on the list and the relevant qualifications/experience.

What often happens is that people who don't have those things, think that a WHV somehow offers them an alternative route to PR, where they don't need all that stuff - which is a myth.

  • Like 2

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

There is, however as you point out, you must have a skill that's on the list and the relevant qualifications/experience.

What often happens is that people who don't have those things, think that a WHV somehow offers them an alternative route to PR, where they don't need all that stuff - which is a myth.

Agree. Its not a loophole. 


Occupation: ICT Customer Support Officer
Birth Country: LR
Stream: ENS TRT
Number of applicants: 2
ENS 186 Visa and Nomination applied:  March 2018

VISA GRANTED - 13/03/19

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@boo-yaa I'm intrigued by your country of birth. Liberia? 


AITSL assessment complete-09/10/2014 | IELTS L8.5, R8, W8.5, S8.5. -13/12/2014 | EOI submitted 07/01/2015 (65) invite 09/01/2015 | 189 Visa applied - 10/01/2015 | Meds -20/02/2015 | PCC-08/03/2015 | Visa granted! - 20/03/2015.

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18 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

I think LR is “low risk”!!!

Ah ok, I was thinking the English is good for a Liberian!


AITSL assessment complete-09/10/2014 | IELTS L8.5, R8, W8.5, S8.5. -13/12/2014 | EOI submitted 07/01/2015 (65) invite 09/01/2015 | 189 Visa applied - 10/01/2015 | Meds -20/02/2015 | PCC-08/03/2015 | Visa granted! - 20/03/2015.

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