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Hi Everyone,

Thanks to almighty, finally I am here in Australia.

I have a question,  What if I wish to move to another state? am i supposed to serve the entire lock-in period(2 Years)? I am unmarried now, what if I move to another state and try processing my partner visa from there? is partner visa dependent on my visa 190 conditions?

Seniors, please help.

Thanks,

Jay

 

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It is only a moral obligation, however, if it was established that you never had an intent to stay in the state, that could give grounds for your visa to be cancelled 

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It is exactly for this reason why states are reluctant to offer 190 sponsorship anymore and are moving to the 489 visa instead.

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Raul T Senise

Registered Migration Agent

MARN 0636699

www.ozimmigration.com

"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

 

 

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@Raul Senise

Thanks for your time.

 what if someone fails to find a job? can he/she move to another state?

what are the implications on partner visa?

Thanks,

Jay

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1 hour ago, VERYSTORMY said:

It is only a moral obligation, however, if it was established that you never had an intent to stay in the state, that could give grounds for your visa to be cancelled 

its been a month and finding a job in Melbourne is really tough. If my concern is genuine, can I ask the state government to waive off the two years lock-in period?

Thanks,

Jay

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9 minutes ago, JayNair said:

its been a month and finding a job in Melbourne is really tough. If my concern is genuine, can I ask the state government to waive off the two years lock-in period?

Thanks,

Jay

Give it 6 months and if you are still struggling you need to let them know and see if they are OK with you trying elsewhere but if you're struggling in Melbourne, your chances of getting a job anywhere else are probably going to be rather slim as well. Edited to say, you have the whole of Victoria to choose from, perhaps look state wide.

As you already have a visa what has the partner visa got to do with it?

Edited by Quoll

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1 minute ago, Quoll said:

Give it 6 months and if you are still struggling you need to let them know and see if they are OK with you trying elsewhere but if you're struggling in Melbourne, your chances of getting a job anywhere else are probably going to be rather slim as well.

What if I pitch in at another state, work there for some time and come back to Melbourne? does it make sense? do I need to inform the state government if it is for like 3 months or so?

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You need to tell them if your circumstances change. I don't think they'd think you'd tried very hard if you nick off after a month. They do say in the blurb that you should have funds to support yourself for 6 months as it could take you that long to find work. Stick it out for the 6 months and if you still can't find work, then ask them to release you.

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You are on  190 , so  you are Permanent resident. You are not temprorary resident , so you can  live wherever you want in Australia. That is your constutional right.

Neither state  nor  Department of Immigration will check where you live and  cancel your visa. This is is not like 489.

 Thousands of state sponsored PR holders have not even been  to their sponsored state and granted citizenship  whitout any problem.( including me ) 

There is a relevant thread on forum. please find and read it. 

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4 hours ago, Glenelg said:

You are on  190 , so  you are Permanent resident. You are not temprorary resident , so you can  live wherever you want in Australia. That is your constutional right.

Neither state  nor  Department of Immigration will check where you live and  cancel your visa. This is is not like 489.

 Thousands of state sponsored PR holders have not even been  to their sponsored state and granted citizenship  whitout any problem.( including me ) 

There is a relevant thread on forum. please find and read it. 

A permanent resident is not a citizen its quite different. with pr you don't have the right to do what you want you can't vote, can be asked to leave if you don't meet residency requirements or commit a crime.

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21 minutes ago, can1983 said:

A permanent resident is not a citizen its quite different. with pr you don't have the right to do what you want you can't vote, can be asked to leave if you don't meet residency requirements or commit a crime.

I repeat , There is no state based residency requirement.  Bylaw , a permanent resident can not be held  on a specific area...  The rest of what you are saying  is completely irrelevant to the subject.

 State sponsored   Pr holders can live wherever they want.  it is only a moral obligation.  I am  already a citizen like so many others who did not stay in sponsored state. 

Edited by Glenelg

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This topic always seems to generate strong feelings/opinions for understandable reasons. 

If I was in your shoes I would check the visa conditions as included/advised in the notice of visa grant by Immi. If no conditions are listed (as one would expect with a 190) then you would not be breaching your visa conditions by moving interstate if you chose to do so (since no such conditions exist). 

Any discussion beyond that fact, while understandable, is based on emotion and/or personal values.

Having said that, I can understand why states are increasingly making use of the 489 instead of 190 as outlined by Raul. Recognition that 190 holders are free to move wherever they choose, I would think.


:evilface_frowning_s

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I repeat , There is no state based residency requirement.  Bylaw , a permanent resident can not be held  on a specific area...  The rest of what you are saying  is completely irrelevant to the subject.
 State sponsored   Pr holders can live wherever they want.  it is only a moral obligation.  I am  already a citizen like so many others who did not stay in sponsored state. 


Hi,

Attached from DHA website...

ba506508a7c4ff2bdb35ffb739dc5c6f.png

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There is always a possibility that they may change the rules - it's been mooted - because people are not sticking by the moral obligation. There's no telling what they could do - nothing stopping them from refusing citizenship  for example down the track. Just because it hasn't happened yet doesn't mean it couldn't potentially happen. States are getting ticked off because people get state sponsored and can't be bothered to even try to settle in the state. Technically at the moment you can do what the hell you like but it has the potential to come back and bite you in the bum down the track if the rules change.

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13 minutes ago, mariner2017 said:

 


Hi,

Attached from DHA website...

ba506508a7c4ff2bdb35ffb739dc5c6f.png

 

I already stated  that it was a Moral obligation. 

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They have given me a grant letter stating "Nothing" about the visa conditions, so even if DHA does something in the future, will it affect me? 

 

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@JayNair My advice is to make a genuine effort with your sponsoring State and communicate your efforts with them. Most are very reasonable in this regard and will often assist with finding employment.

Although it is not a condition on your visa, it is an agreement you have signed with the State.

Whether this is a binding legal agreement, a Moral obligation or a worthless promise, it is still something you have agreed to and the basis on why your visa was granted.

Although some like to boast about the fact that they have cheated the system, you should consider that your behaviour will affect the people that follow, as we have already seen the rules changing due to those who don’t care. Due to such behaviour many have now lost their opportunity.

You may also want to consider that the Government is continuing to make it more difficult to obtain Australian Citizenship. It would not surprise me if in the future, flouting this so-called Moral Obligation may be enough to refuse a Citizenship application.

@Glenelg You seem very proud of the fact that you have no regard for a moral undertaking you have agreed to. You may want to consider whether this is an appropriate way of repaying a Country which has given you Citizenship and all of the privileges that comes with.

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  • Thanks 1

Raul T Senise

Registered Migration Agent

MARN 0636699

www.ozimmigration.com

"If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."

 

 

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They have given me a grant letter stating "Nothing" about the visa conditions, so even if DHA does something in the future, will it affect me? 
 

Hi JayNair,
One of my friends (190 visa holder without any conditions)received attached....304fa74febf7a8045e01bcb52f08d632.png

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21 minutes ago, Raul Senise said:

@JayNair My advice is to make a genuine effort with your sponsoring State and communicate your efforts with them. Most are very reasonable in this regard and will often assist with finding employment.

Although it is not a condition on your visa, it is an agreement you have signed with the State.

Whether this is a binding legal agreement, a Moral obligation or a worthless promise, it is still something you have agreed to and the basis on why your visa was granted.

Although some like to boast about the fact that they have cheated the system, you should consider that your behaviour will affect the people that follow, as we have already seen the rules changing due to those who don’t care. Due to such behaviour many have now lost their opportunity.

You may also want to consider that the Government is continuing to make it more difficult to obtain Australian Citizenship. It would not surprise me if in the future, flouting this so-called Moral Obligation may be enough to refuse a Citizenship application.

@Glenelg You seem very proud of the fact that you have no regard for a moral undertaking you have agreed to. You may want to consider whether this is an appropriate way of repaying a Country which has given you Citizenship and all of the privileges that comes with.

Hi Raul,

Genuine question regarding the above.

In your experience/professional opinion what would be required to enforce this aspect of the 190 visa? Would it be to alter the visa conditions or by some other means?

I read a long time ago when it was the 176 (I think) that as of the day PR is granted and activated, you have the same constitutional protections as any other Australian. The discussion of the time was that to enforce the moral obligation/enforce where someone lives would require a constitutional amendment, which in turn requires a referendum on the matter. Is that just forum talk or is there basis to it?

I have no dog in the fight (I am a citizen leaving Australia shortly), I'm just curious as Ive seen it debated numerous times over the years. 

I can understand how flouting the rule will impact others in the future (eg through no longer offering the 190 visa) and also understand the moral aspect of the matter, but curious around the legalities of enforcing this with a 190 as it currently stands.

Same question for citizenship, I guess the relevant part would be the character requirement. Do you think it would stand up in court if someone was refused on the basis of moving interstate but had no criminal history, productive member of society, working, paying taxes, integrated into local community etc?

Thanks


:evilface_frowning_s

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1 hour ago, MacGyver said:

Hi Raul,

Genuine question regarding the above.

In your experience/professional opinion what would be required to enforce this aspect of the 190 visa? Would it be to alter the visa conditions or by some other means?

I read a long time ago when it was the 176 (I think) that as of the day PR is granted and activated, you have the same constitutional protections as any other Australian. The discussion of the time was that to enforce the moral obligation/enforce where someone lives would require a constitutional amendment, which in turn requires a referendum on the matter. Is that just forum talk or is there basis to it?

I have no dog in the fight (I am a citizen leaving Australia shortly), I'm just curious as Ive seen it debated numerous times over the years. 

I can understand how flouting the rule will impact others in the future (eg through no longer offering the 190 visa) and also understand the moral aspect of the matter, but curious around the legalities of enforcing this with a 190 as it currently stands.

Same question for citizenship, I guess the relevant part would be the character requirement. Do you think it would stand up in court if someone was refused on the basis of moving interstate but had no criminal history, productive member of society, working, paying taxes, integrated into local community etc?

Thanks

Nothing to stop the department specifying in the future that a condition of citizenship is that if you come in a 190 you must spend 2year in the State. 

I just think its rotten for people who cannot get a visa because the places have been taken by people who have no intention of living in the sponsoring state. If someone really wants to live in SA (for instance) but the place was taken by someone who stuck their fingers up and said Stuff you I'm just going elsewhere, the  that really isn't fair at all

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DoHA  are cancelling some 190 visas in cases where holders failed to meet the 'moral' obligation.

Those who believe they are constitutionally/legally ok to do this might find themselves up that well known creek in a barbed wire canoe and with no paddle.

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Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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45 minutes ago, wrussell said:

DoHA  are cancelling some 190 visas in cases where holders failed to meet the 'moral' obligation.

Those who believe they are constitutionally/legally ok to do this might find themselves up that well known creek in a barbed wire canoe and with no paddle.

Wow, good to know that! I wouldn't be in the least surprised if they changed the rules so that those who thumb their noses at the state sponsoring them are sanctioned later on but it looks like they might be heading that way anyway.

Edited by Quoll

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50 minutes ago, wrussell said:

DoHA  are cancelling some 190 visas in cases where holders failed to meet the 'moral' obligation.

Those who believe they are constitutionally/legally ok to do this might find themselves up that well known creek in a barbed wire canoe and with no paddle.

Very good to hear, its a loophole that has existed for far too long.

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1 hour ago, wrussell said:

DoHA  are cancelling some 190 visas in cases where holders failed to meet the 'moral' obligation.

Those who believe they are constitutionally/legally ok to do this might find themselves up that well known creek in a barbed wire canoe and with no paddle.

I have been researching on this topic, could not even find a single visa denial case. May I know the source of your information?

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Things change. What applied even 6 months ago may not apply now. Immigration are tightening up all the time and this loophole needs to be closed really. Some areas really do have a shortage but if people do not meet the obligation to work there why bother giving them extra points?


So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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