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3girlmama

Seriously thinking of making the leap to Oz

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4 hours ago, Lavers said:

Ive allowed for that thanks just didn't add it to my list as im only looking at $500 for 3 week rental so neither here nor there, although the small bits add up.

That's the point - if you're trying to convince yourself (or someone else?) that you can afford it, then it's tempting to leave out "the small bits", but it doesn't take much to add up.  As I mentioned, even buying all the little stuff like sheets, towels, and totally re-equipping the kitchen cost a fortune.  Especially when you first arrive because you have no idea where any of the shops are, and you don't have time to go hunting for bargains, you just have to grab what you can get your hands on.

Whitegoods and electrical goods are expensive and I assume you're not bringing those.

Also, if you're bringing two months' wages to live on, you have to include that as part of your cost of moving - you're never going to get that money back, after all.  And depending on what work you do, two months to find work might be optimistic.  The common advice now is that migrants should budget for six months to find their first proper job.  

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Your right marisa I will factor these costs in.

6 months to find a job I hope it doesn't take that long.

Im in engineering doing metal fabrication and boiler making, there seems to be plenty of jobs on the internet so hopefully it doesn't take that long.

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10 hours ago, Lavers said:

I may look at a 3 month rental then at least that stops some of the pressure in finding a job straight away. Am I right in thinking that you cant rent a house until you have a job?

It's not that you can't .. but if you don't have a job the landlord would be worrying that you won't be able to meet the rent.  


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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10 hours ago, Lavers said:

I may look at a 3 month rental then at least that stops some of the pressure in finding a job straight away. Am I right in thinking that you cant rent a house until you have a job?

Short term rentals are uncommon.  The landlord would have to be desparate in which case they would give a more normal 6-12 month lease.  You can find some lease-break properties which have just a few months left.


Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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8 hours ago, Lavers said:

Your right marisa I will factor these costs in.

6 months to find a job I hope it doesn't take that long.

Im in engineering doing metal fabrication and boiler making, there seems to be plenty of jobs on the internet so hopefully it doesn't take that long.

Have you checked whether you need any Australian licences to do your job?  

It's a confusing system - you're asked to do skills assessments etc when you apply for the visa, but that's only to satisfy Immigration. It doesn't mean you're allowed to work at your trade in Australia. 

A lot of electricians and plumbers get caught out like that - even though they're fully UK qualified and their qualifications were accepted for Immigration purposes, when they arrive in Australia they find they have to do a year's apprenticeship (at lower wages) to get their Australian licence.  I have no idea what the situation is with boilermakers.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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6 hours ago, Gbye grey sky said:

Short term rentals are uncommon.  The landlord would have to be desparate in which case they would give a more normal 6-12 month lease.  You can find some lease-break properties which have just a few months left.

Sorry I meant to say holiday rental

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6 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Have you checked whether you need any Australian licences to do your job?  

It's a confusing system - you're asked to do skills assessments etc when you apply for the visa, but that's only to satisfy Immigration. It doesn't mean you're allowed to work at your trade in Australia. 

A lot of electricians and plumbers get caught out like that - even though they're fully UK qualified and their qualifications were accepted for Immigration purposes, when they arrive in Australia they find they have to do a year's apprenticeship (at lower wages) to get their Australian licence.  I have no idea what the situation is with boilermakers.

I've had a few friends that have moved to australia over the last few years and as far as I'm aware your good to go when you arrive. I'm currently a foreman in the UK but I'm looking at going straight back onto the tools when I make the move.

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23 hours ago, Lavers said:

Visa for family of 4 = £4000      Skill Assessment = £1500      Medical = £860                 Holiday rental 60days = £3500              Cheap car = £1700

Flights for 4 = £1200                   House Bond = £1400               Shipping Costs = £2000

Also other small bits and pieces so add another £1000

Then lastly money to cover wages whilst I find work but seeing as I will be in a holiday rental for 2 months costs will be low.

I haven't seen your registration (for some reason I am assuming you're a nurse)...

[EDIT] -- removed nursing costs ....??facepalm.

A 189 visa works out just over £4200 plus other associated costs eg english test if needed for points

I've also been keeping an eye out for family of four tickets (though my two are younger than yours, I'd be buying 4 seats instead of 3 as i did last time simply to have extra pace as my little on wont fit in bassinet anymore...) even at that.. the cheapest tickets (using the "fly on a Tuesday/Wednesday with up to 2 stops" rule) I can get on airlines REALLY worth flying on for that long journey, i found November tickets at £1400 with Etihad

and yes the housing thing... of the three estate agents we spoke to, they said I'd only get a house with a letter from an employer (plus supporting contract) to be eligible in the normal deposit plus 1st month rent rule... otherwise, the cheapest one wanted 6 months rent up front plus deposit

 

Edited by SWMOY04

Melbourne... ahhhhhh😊

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43 minutes ago, SWMOY04 said:

I haven't seen your registration (for some reason I am assuming you're a nurse)...

[EDIT] -- removed nursing costs ....??facepalm.

A 189 visa works out just over £4200 plus other associated costs eg english test if needed for points

I've also been keeping an eye out for family of four tickets (though my two are younger than yours, I'd be buying 4 seats instead of 3 as i did last time simply to have extra pace as my little on wont fit in bassinet anymore...) even at that.. the cheapest tickets (using the "fly on a Tuesday/Wednesday with up to 2 stops" rule) I can get on airlines REALLY worth flying on for that long journey, i found November tickets at £1400 with Etihad

and yes the housing thing... of the three estate agents we spoke to, they said I'd only get a house with a letter from an employer (plus supporting contract) to be eligible in the normal deposit plus 1st month rent rule... otherwise, the cheapest one wanted 6 months rent up front plus deposit

 

Hi

Im an engineer and I have already got my English sorted so its something ticked off the list haha

Your doing the right things with the seats, don't think it will be much fun with your little one on your lap for 24hrs and the things with the flights the prices will fluctuate daily.

So I could rent a house without a job but they would want 6months rent upfront but would the deposit still only be 1 month?

Is this a common thing with renting or would they tend to avoid doing that and go with people who have jobs?

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On Tuesday, August 07, 2018 at 18:33, ali said:

I'm one of the ones who love Perth - one of the attractions for us was the Mediterranean climate and being the least populated state.  A lot is made of the 'isolation' - personally, as a family we've never felt isolated or cut off but appreciate some do.  We moved here knowing no-one (my brother is in QLD), because it was the right choice for us as a family, we haven't regretted the move.

I agree with others, do your research and decide which state/area suits you.   Good luck 

I'd second the isolation thing being a bit of a furphy that I've never understood. There's plenty to do in WA. It's not like you're stuck in Perth. A few hours drive South and it's like a different country and climate.

Loads of people head North for the winter with a caravan and come back when the weather warms up. We have friends up in Ningaloo at the moment. Weathers gorgeous up there this time of year. No planes to catch, waiting around at airports, just a long drive.

Personally we live near a great beach, walking distance and every weekend seems like a holiday. Even in winter.

Don't miss going away on holidays and we used to live for that couple of weeks in the Greek Isles or somewhere when we in the UK.

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3 hours ago, Lavers said:

Hi

Im an engineer and I have already got my English sorted so its something ticked off the list haha

Your doing the right things with the seats, don't think it will be much fun with your little one on your lap for 24hrs and the things with the flights the prices will fluctuate daily.

So I could rent a house without a job but they would want 6months rent upfront but would the deposit still only be 1 month?

Is this a common thing with renting or would they tend to avoid doing that and go with people who have jobs?

If it's a holiday rent then they won't mind if you're paying up front


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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3 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

I'd second the isolation thing being a bit of a furphy that I've never understood. There's plenty to do in WA. It's not like you're stuck in Perth. A few hours drive South and it's like a different country and climate.

Loads of people head North for the winter with a caravan and come back when the weather warms up. We have friends up in Ningaloo at the moment. Weathers gorgeous up there this time of year. No planes to catch, waiting around at airports, just a long drive.

Personally we live near a great beach, walking distance and every weekend seems like a holiday. Even in winter.

Don't miss going away on holidays and we used to live for that couple of weeks in the Greek Isles or somewhere when we in the UK.

We drove to Exmouth (not all in one go mind lol).


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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4 hours ago, Lavers said:

Hi

Im an engineer and I have already got my English sorted so its something ticked off the list haha

Your doing the right things with the seats, don't think it will be much fun with your little one on your lap for 24hrs and the things with the flights the prices will fluctuate daily.

So I could rent a house without a job but they would want 6months rent upfront but would the deposit still only be 1 month?

Is this a common thing with renting or would they tend to avoid doing that and go with people who have jobs?

Not all agents will request 6 months rent up front and if you havent yet secured work ,showing them a copy of a healthy bank account can work just as well. A lot of it will depend on the demand for rentals in the area you choose.

As for short term furnished/ holiday let, quite a lot of places will give a discount if you stay 12 weeks or more. They are more expensive than a longer term rentals but the price normally includes your utilities and of course the furniture. I know of families who have stayed in holiday cabin parks for their first couple of months and have found this worked well too, especially with kids as there's normally a pool and playground.

 Cal x


If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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Thanks everyone for previous input.

Ive been trying to get as accurate a living bills that I can have come up with this147039959_billsaus20082018.thumb.jpg.815f33db1b2e647ea631a6bd68767797.jpg can anyone please amend to give me a better idea. The mortgage/rent should be the other way round and based in Adelaide.

Thanks again

 

Mark

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I can't help with specifics but it might help to know that comparing our costs in the UK compared to our costs in Australia, they seemed pretty much even.  So I don't think you need to worry too much about trying to calculate the cost of living - just assume your budget will be similar to what you pay now.

The exception to that is, of course, your rent or mortgage costs, because that depends on whether houses are cheaper or more expensive than where you are in the UK.  

Like I said, the biggest expense is all the set-up costs and the time taken to get work, which will eat into your savings and reduce the amount you  have for a deposit, thus increasing your mortgage.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Ok thanks marisa I need to stop worrying, I think too much is made about the cost of living in Australia.

Regarding renting...is it correct that the landlord pays the council rates and water?

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

I can't help with specifics but it might help to know that comparing our costs in the UK compared to our costs in Australia, they seemed pretty much even.  So I don't think you need to worry too much about trying to calculate the cost of living - just assume your budget will be similar to what you pay now.

The exception to that is, of course, your rent or mortgage costs, because that depends on whether houses are cheaper or more expensive than where you are in the UK.  

Like I said, the biggest expense is all the set-up costs and the time taken to get work, which will eat into your savings and reduce the amount you  have for a deposit, thus increasing your mortgage.  

Agree with this. More expensive for some things less so for others. The real difference is in the housing costs for sure.

Yes the landlord pays the rates and the water standing costs, you usually pay for what you use. My son has his usage included in his rent as well though.

Good luck, you’ll be fine, embrace it!

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9 hours ago, Lavers said:

Ok thanks marisa I need to stop worrying, I think too much is made about the cost of living in Australia.

Regarding renting...is it correct that the landlord pays the council rates and water?

The cost of living is complained about because housing costs are part of that, and for many families now, their mortgage or rent is eating up most of their income

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I'm ready for a significant upgrade on my house in the UK and as I bought my current house just before recession there's no real equity in it so my new mortgage would be jumping up significantly here anyway.

It is either try emigrating to aus, or use that money for a deposit on a new house here.

You seem to get a lot more for your money in aus, than you do in the UK.

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37 minutes ago, Lavers said:

You seem to get a lot more for your money in aus, than you do in the UK.

Absolutely not true!  It depends entirely on what area you're comparing.  For instance, an ordinary three-bedroom house in Sydney would cost you over $2 million but you could buy the same house in rural Tasmania for less than $500,000.

Also bear in mind that real estate agents in Australia under-quote.  It's so bad they've passed laws in some states to try to prevent it, but the agents keep doing it anyway. So if you're looking at realestate.com.au or domain.com.au, the actual selling price will be well over the price guide - in some in-demand suburbs, it may be as much as $100,000 over. Also they doctor the photographs so the place looks better than it really is.  And finally, don't forget there is stamp duty to pay on top of the sale price.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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4 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Also bear in mind that real estate agents in Australia under-quote.  It's so bad they've passed laws in some states to try to prevent it, but the agents keep doing it anyway. So if you're looking at realestate.com.au or domain.com.au, the actual selling price will be well over the price guide - in some in-demand suburbs, it may be as much as $100,000 over. Also they doctor the photographs so the place looks better than it really is.  And finally, don't forget there is stamp duty to pay on top of the sale price.

I think that varies between State and also depending on the housing market. I've bought several houses in WA and have always paid below the asking price.

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10 minutes ago, Drumbeat said:

I think that varies between State and also depending on the housing market. I've bought several houses in WA and have always paid below the asking price.

At the moment I think you could offer half the asking price in WA ?

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25 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Absolutely not true!  It depends entirely on what area you're comparing.  For instance, an ordinary three-bedroom house in Sydney would cost you over $2 million but you could buy the same house in rural Tasmania for less than $500,000.

Also bear in mind that real estate agents in Australia under-quote.  It's so bad they've passed laws in some states to try to prevent it, but the agents keep doing it anyway. So if you're looking at realestate.com.au or domain.com.au, the actual selling price will be well over the price guide - in some in-demand suburbs, it may be as much as $100,000 over. Also they doctor the photographs so the place looks better than it really is.  And finally, don't forget there is stamp duty to pay on top of the sale price.

Im comparing the houses that would be in my sort of range $500 - $600,000 and you seem to get more. I live in a place called Rossendale in the north west and although its not the worst place its also not the best with very little for kids to do.

If you looked at one of the nicer areas (and your not far from a scruffier areas) you would be looking at £270 - £350,000 for a detached house, 3 bedrooms and not the biggest garden with neighbours practically on your doorstep.

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1 hour ago, can1983 said:

At the moment I think you could offer half the asking price in WA ?

Depends what suburb you're looking at. They seem to be selling pretty fast and holding the price near us. Anywhere near the beach is a good investment.

I think what helps here are very few auctions, apart from the top end of the market, you have a good idea of the price and don't have to waste time.

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