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3girlmama

Seriously thinking of making the leap to Oz

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Hello. This is my first post on this forum. Forgive me if there are similar posts. 

My husband and I are seriously discussing moving to Australia in the next 1-2 years. The U.K. is dragging us down; it’s getting more and more crowded and people are getting more aggressive. The roads can’t cope with the traffic increase. The NHS is diabolical (and I work in it!) More houses are being built everywhere, even on green belt land. Yet no provision is made for the increase in population to schools or health services. Crime is on the increase as visible policing is non existent. So, in a nutshell, we are not fans of our country! 

Australia is something we’ve discussed over the  past decade but only this year we’ve been serious about making a move. 

Thinking of Melbourne at the moment, as it’s not as isolated as Perth. 

I’m a nurse (practice nurse of 12 yrs, before that a district nurse for 3 yrs and before that an orthopaedic nurse for 1yr)

im working towards my degree as I hold a DipHE in adult nursing. Only 1 more module to do then I’m BSc level ?

reading the visa criteria I need to be degree level before I apply. 

My hubby is self employed, non skilled worker. 

We have 3 children; ages 10,8 and 12weeks.

i don’t really know what to do first/where to start with making enquiries about moving? Do I approach health care facilities for any vacancies? Do I apply for a visa? That could be costly if we don’t move!! 

We are looking at going to Australia for 2-3 weeks in October to put out feelers our...

any tips or advice from anyone greatly received!!

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How much do you know about life in Australia? All the issues you mention are just as prevalent over there, believe me!

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You will need a visa before health services can look seriously at any application, also, they generally want to fill vacancies pretty quickly.  My own health service gives priority to citizens or PR visa holders.

You need to first look at what visa you wish to apply for and how many points you will have by the time you apply.  In order to apply you will need your skills assessment from ANMAC.  In order to practice in Australia you need to be registered with AHPRA


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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Thank you for your replies. 

I realise the grass isn’t always greener on the other side, Nemesis. Sadly! 

We like the outdoors way of life, and the education system and healthcare systems are said to be very good..better than U.K. 

australia is also second on the list of the best places to live. 

The weather is a big pull, too.  

I know cost of living can be higher than in the U.K. but that wages are also often higher than the U.K. 

Ali, where /how do I find out what points I have currently got? 

So you think getting a visa first is the best thing to do before approaching anyone for a position?

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The weather in Melbourne is more European than anywhere else in Australia - having lived elsewhere in Australia for 30 years, I live in Melbourne now, and it's very noticeable that the lifestyle is much more like Europe.  Arts and crafts are much more popular because the life is more indoors-y.  Also, there are few beaches in Melbourne and it's likely you'll be living a very long way from them, unless you're wealthy. 

Check out domain.com.au for an indication of house prices, to see if you can afford it. Sydney is the most expensive city, Melbourne comes second, everywhere else is cheaper.  The reality is that the majority of people in both cities live an hour or more's drive from the beach - beachside homes are for multi-millionaires!

As a nurse, you're in the lucky position of being able to get a job in a smaller city where you have more chance of affording a beach lifestyle. Consider Geelong, Newcastle, Sunshine Coast.

Definitely, get the visa first, you can't get a job otherwise.

It is possible to get an employer to sponsor you for a visa, BUT that's only a temporary visa which will get you a couple of years' adventure.  At the end of that time, you'll still have to qualify for a permanent visa if you want to stay and go through all the same hoops.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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1 hour ago, 3girlmama said:

Thank you for your replies. 

I realise the grass isn’t always greener on the other side, Nemesis. Sadly! 

We like the outdoors way of life, and the education system and healthcare systems are said to be very good..better than U.K. 

australia is also second on the list of the best places to live. 

The weather is a big pull, too.  

I know cost of living can be higher than in the U.K. but that wages are also often higher than the U.K. 

Ali, where /how do I find out what points I have currently got? 

So you think getting a visa first is the best thing to do before approaching anyone for a position?

Hi..

I checked for my points here .

like Marisa said, it may be worth considering a PR (Permanent Residency Visa) from the outset as you may still need to do it in a few years after sponsorship anyway.

 

It is a bit costly:

  • ANMAC costs (not sure how much as I've not had to do anmac, I wasn't main applicant...
  • AHPRA registration $660 plus whatever your uni charges for transcript, plus NMC £34, plus English test cost of your choice, plus police checks (about $150  per country you have lived as adult)
  • PR Visa AUS$  main applicant about $3600= partner 1800 plus each child about 900. I am aware these figures have gone up. I'm just quoting you what its cost me so far.
  • Flights...
  • also, emigration lawyers if you choose to use them to go over your application process.

 

the good news:

PR Visa gives you more rights than most (from what ive found so far..) eg. $20,000 grant from govt towards buying your first property (t&c's apply yada yada)...

I hope this helps... it is by no way the only way to do things, neither is this the entire list of everything needed as each persons applications are different

 


Melbourne... ahhhhhh😊

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Melbourne has crime, traffic, road rage incidents, is cold in the winter and most people are shackled to the daily grind living miles from where they work.

Personally I don't think this is the answer if you are disillusioned with the UK. You are about 30 years too late for the land of milk and honey and the lucky country.

Also do you not need experience post qualification? I think if you 'graduate' today you have no post graduate experience irrespective of how many years you've done at diploma level. So you might not meet the experience level (unfair but I think this is the case)

Edited by can1983
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7 minutes ago, can1983 said:

Melbourne has crime, traffic, road rage incidents, is cold in the winter and most people are shackled to the daily grind living miles from where they work.

Personally I don't think this is the answer if you are disillusioned with the UK. You are about 30 years too late for the land of milk and honey and the lucky country.

Also do you not need experience post qualification? I think if you 'graduate' today you have no post graduate experience irrespective of how many years you've done at diploma level. So you might not meet the experience level (unfair but I think this is the case)

The OP is coming for a visit in October so hopefully will get a good feel for the place.Huge decision to make with three children.     

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5 minutes ago, Toots said:

The OP is coming for a visit in October so hopefully will get a good feel for the place.Huge decision to make with three children.     

It is and I struggle to think of any circumstances where Melbourne would offer something that the UK cannot offer unless you are the deputy tournament organiser at Wimbledon and get offered overall control of the Australian open ?

I have a distant relative who moved to Melbourne in the 1970's got a job when she couldn't in the UK and a massive house which should couldn't afford in the UK so it all worked super well. But I can't see that happening these days or ever again

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42 minutes ago, can1983 said:

Melbourne has crime, traffic, road rage incidents, is cold in the winter and most people are shackled to the daily grind living miles from where they work.

Personally I don't think this is the answer if you are disillusioned with the UK. You are about 30 years too late for the land of milk and honey and the lucky country.

Also do you not need experience post qualification? I think if you 'graduate' today you have no post graduate experience irrespective of how many years you've done at diploma level. So you might not meet the experience level (unfair but I think this is the case)

just to offer a slightly different view.

I was in Melbourne fro a few weeks until two weeks ago. I was driving around and the only episodes of frustrated drivers I noticed were in the CBD... otherwise I would class driving around Melbourne as somewhat similar to driving on the outskirts of London (cities and towns just outside M25)

I spent a lot of time with friends and family who are scattered from Bacchus March, to northern suburds all the way across to Druin...they are all in healthcare and the average message was the same.... Victoria averages out better than the UK... especially for us nurses.

I'd say go for it... I wasn't sure and had been dragging my feet with nursing reg, but in the two weeks since I came back home, I have already gathered all my required documentation and sent it off last Friday... I am now that eager to go there...

I am comparing present day UK to the experiences being faced by people I trust who have moved in the last 7 years, including a couple who moved earlier this year... none have ever considered moving back

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Melbourne... ahhhhhh😊

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1 hour ago, can1983 said:

Melbourne has crime, traffic, road rage incidents, is cold in the winter and most people are shackled to the daily grind living miles from where they work.

Personally I don't think this is the answer if you are disillusioned with the UK. You are about 30 years too late for the land of milk and honey and the lucky country.

Also do you not need experience post qualification? I think if you 'graduate' today you have no post graduate experience irrespective of how many years you've done at diploma level. So you might not meet the experience level (unfair but I think this is the case)

nurses can move as soon as they qualify to register...its a case of the nurses experience and willingness of employers to take you on...

I'm sure your actual nursing experience would count more than thr "academic/visa/degree" experience when it came to interviews for jobs and actual work.

besides... diploma nurses can still use the New Zealand Workaround last time I heard.... so you do have options


Melbourne... ahhhhhh😊

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1 hour ago, can1983 said:

It is and I struggle to think of any circumstances where Melbourne would offer something that the UK cannot offer unless you are the deputy tournament organiser at Wimbledon and get offered overall control of the Australian open ?

I have a distant relative who moved to Melbourne in the 1970's got a job when she couldn't in the UK and a massive house which should couldn't afford in the UK so it all worked super well. But I can't see that happening these days or ever again

I can offer a rebuttal

I am an agency Band 6 nurse (considered "lots of money" ?in UK circles)...due to the niche job I do [I'm the only one doing it in an area as large as (if not larger than) Wales]

I have taken my job description...which is quite niche and compared it to projects trying to copy it in Australia... the yearly wage in Victoria works out at about 1 and half times as much as my agency yearly wage in UK...(that's almost 2.5 to 2.75 times as much as what the role would pay directly from  NHS to me)...working regular 40 hour weeks (I work 50 hours a week at present).

I would also be getting a bump of about 4%-7.5% on top of my wage amongst maaaany other enhancements for postgraduate study.

Housing... easier to access though the houses are more expensive....

ultimately .. you can use tools such as NUMBEO to compare cost of living comparing you present town to one you would like to live in...

 

Edited by SWMOY04
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Melbourne... ahhhhhh😊

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19 minutes ago, SWMOY04 said:

I can offer a rebuttal

I am an agency Band 6 nurse (considered "lots of money" ?in UK circles)...due to the niche job I do [I'm the only one doing it in an area as large as (if not larger than) Wales]

I have taken my job description...which is quite niche and compared it to projects trying to copy it in Australia... the yearly wage in Victoria works out at about 1 and half times as much as my agency yearly wage in UK...(that's almost 2.5 to 2.75 times as much as what the role would pay directly from  NHS to me)...working regular 40 hour weeks (I work 50 hours a week at present).

I would also be getting a bump of about 4%-7.5% on top of my wage amongst maaaany other enhancements for postgraduate study.

Housing... easier to access though the houses are more expensive....

ultimately .. you can use tools such as NUMBEO to compare cost of living comparing you present town to one you would like to live in...

 

Great to offer some relevant career tips to the OP

the point I was trying to make is that it is very common that people who move to Australia looking to solve all the things they hate about the UK are often disappointed.... its a BIG risk with 3 kids in tow

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46 minutes ago, can1983 said:

Great to offer some relevant career tips to the OP

the point I was trying to make is that it is very common that people who move to Australia looking to solve all the things they hate about the UK are often disappointed.... its a BIG risk with 3 kids in tow

It's a true point to make too. Both are first world countries. Both have different pluses and minuses and both are essentially the same over time with the daily grind. Both have world class healthcare systems, and both have their own share of problems. Both have world class education.

The point is not to make the choice on moving because you think the UK has problems that Australia can solve - just like you said.

 

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1 hour ago, can1983 said:

Great to offer some relevant career tips to the OP

the point I was trying to make is that it is very common that people who move to Australia looking to solve all the things they hate about the UK are often disappointed.... its a BIG risk with 3 kids in tow

well said..., I get you now!!

where was PIO when I first considered Oz 4 years ago? ?


Melbourne... ahhhhhh😊

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Just on another note Practice Nursing here does not have the same status is in the UK , it is generally poorly paid, (average around $26-$30 per hour with most salaries at the lower end) and you work under the direction of GP Not as an independent practitioner, it’s a much more a business model and about making a profit, 

on the plus side because of those reasons there is usually quite a few jobs around as the turnover is quite high. 

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1 hour ago, shaunfreo said:

Just on another note Practice Nursing here does not have the same status is in the UK , it is generally poorly paid, (average around $26-$30 per hour with most salaries at the lower end) and you work under the direction of GP Not as an independent practitioner, it’s a much more a business model and about making a profit, 

on the plus side because of those reasons there is usually quite a few jobs around as the turnover is quite high. 

Agree with this. A lot of practice nurses are Enrolled Nurses. Tried it a few years ago, left after about 3 days. Absolute rort of Medicare at the particular clinic I was in and just expected to follow GP instructions, no room for independent thought there my friend!

Community or District nursing in Melbourne is very task orientated now. Funding rules have changed and the largest provider RDNS made large numbers of nurses redundant a while ago, only to rehire others on lower wages and crappier conditions. Other private providers in the community pay poorly and are on the general nurses award which is shite.

It would depend what the OPs other half does for work. A second good wage would help. 

Certainly not saying don’t do it, just saying think carefully about your own personal circumstances and how you would realistically manage.

Not sure if any health services in Melbourne are sponsoring (maybe hospitals for ward work) so definitely get PR visa sorted first. Nurses are not as short here as the UK. Far fewer jobs around than in previous years. More competition from people with “local experience “.

Maybe rural nursing has less competition, but that is far from a beach usually.

To provide some context I am a nurse and have just moved back to the UK after 13 years. I had had enough of over an hour each way commute to work to live out in the middle of nowhere with no pavements, or streetlights or shops. Couldn’t afford to live any closer, but I had specific accommodation needs as I had an elderly relative living with us, so you may do better depending on combined income.

And if you want to see a laid back Aussie go feral, put them behind the wheel of a car!

Victoria had 500000 cars added to their roads in a 5 year period not so long ago. Most of them would have been in Melbourne. Infrastructure is so far behind that sort of population growth.

Anyway, only the OP can decide what is best for them and plenty of people live in Melbourne so it must be ok for some!

Good luck with what you decide! ?

 

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Thank you all for your replies, advice and tips. Personally I was thinking of Perth or even Adelaide but DH thought Melbourne was better because there are more cities/places around it than Perth. 

I totally understand that moving to a new country isn’t the answer to all our gripes with the U.K. ? I’m not that naive but when you’ve been thinking about it for so long and suddenly it’s all you can think about, I think it’s telling us to look more closely at the reality of it. Which is what we are doing now. 

Certainly having 3 children means we have to do loooaaads of research before we even consider making the first move to do with anything australia-move-based. 

Thats the beauty of forums; open questions and open honest replies with advice x

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9 minutes ago, 3girlmama said:

Thank you all for your replies, advice and tips. Personally I was thinking of Perth or even Adelaide but DH thought Melbourne was better because there are more cities/places around it than Perth. 

I totally understand that moving to a new country isn’t the answer to all our gripes with the U.K. ? I’m not that naive but when you’ve been thinking about it for so long and suddenly it’s all you can think about, I think it’s telling us to look more closely at the reality of it. Which is what we are doing now. 

Certainly having 3 children means we have to do loooaaads of research before we even consider making the first move to do with anything australia-move-based. 

Thats the beauty of forums; open questions and open honest replies with advice x

Excellent! 

Glad you take everything we write as it is intended, to give you an idea of “life”. All of our experiences are real to each if us even if others on here deny it. And that goes  both ways wirh positive and negative experiences.

Check out all the states you are thinking about and compare all aspects of life in each. At the end of the day it will be a leap of faith as no one knows how it will work out. Plan as best you can and if possible allow yourself a safety net, at least the cost of flights back!

I was the same as you 14 years ago, not 3 children and a husband though! But with the same gripes and disillusionment. To me it all depends where you are moving to and where you are moving from. Lots of people on here own a house, dual incomes etc. Me, a single parent from a council estate! It really felt like I had little to lose. I moved to the Bellarine Peninsula outside of Geelong, no comparison!

I think you will do it if you can get the visas because it’s what you want/need to do and I genuinely wish you all the best with it.

Just as an aside, Victoria/Tasmania have the worst paid nurses in the country! Shysters! WA and Qld much better! 

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1 hour ago, 3girlmama said:

Thank you all for your replies, advice and tips. Personally I was thinking of Perth or even Adelaide but DH thought Melbourne was better because there are more cities/places around it than Perth. 

Certainly having 3 children means we have to do loooaaads of research before we even consider making the first move to do with anything australia-move-based. 

I think your husband is right to be concerned about Perth being isolated.  It's fine if you love it, BUT the problem arises if you don't love it and want to move  - because it will cost you almost as much to move from Perth to, say Melbourne or Brisbane as it did to get from the UK to Perth!    Whereas if you start in a city on the Eastern side, it's much easier to move to another city on the Eastern side if you don't like it.  

Is there a reason you didn't look at Brisbane?  Too hot?  Like I said, most migrants can't look at the smaller places like Sunshine Coast, Newcastle, Geelong because of the lack of corporate jobs.  As a nurse, you can get a job anywhere there's a hospital, and if your husband is a tradie, he'd likely find work too.

The big problem with Melbourne is housing, as Amber said.  Yes, you can find something affordable if you live a long way out and commute, but as Amber found, that wears thin - and you'll likely be a long way from a beach, too. Plus the weather isn't that much better than the south of England.  

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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There are a number of hospitals close to beaches in Melbourne.  Here is a list of large public hospitals

Metropolitan Melbourne hospitals and health services

 
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3 hours ago, 3girlmama said:

Thank you all for your replies, advice and tips. Personally I was thinking of Perth or even Adelaide but DH thought Melbourne was better because there are more cities/places around it than Perth. 

I totally understand that moving to a new country isn’t the answer to all our gripes with the U.K. ? I’m not that naive but when you’ve been thinking about it for so long and suddenly it’s all you can think about, I think it’s telling us to look more closely at the reality of it. Which is what we are doing now. 

Certainly having 3 children means we have to do loooaaads of research before we even consider making the first move to do with anything australia-move-based. 

Thats the beauty of forums; open questions and open honest replies with advice x

I'm one of the ones who love Perth - one of the attractions for us was the Mediterranean climate and being the least populated state.  A lot is made of the 'isolation' - personally, as a family we've never felt isolated or cut off but appreciate some do.  We moved here knowing no-one (my brother is in QLD), because it was the right choice for us as a family, we haven't regretted the move.

I agree with others, do your research and decide which state/area suits you.   Good luck 

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I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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1 hour ago, starlight7 said:

There are a number of hospitals close to beaches in Melbourne.  

Of course there are.  The question is, if the OP wants to live close to one of those beachside hospitals, can the family afford it, or will she end up having to live much further away and commute, like Amber?


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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3girlmama

I've just started the process of applying for australia and I'll be taking my 2 daughters who will be 9 and 4 if all goes to plan.

 

At the end of the day I don't see it as as a risk, I either don't do it and I'll live the rest of my life thinking what if. We go and it's the best the decision we ever made after everything settles down or it's not what we thought and your on a flight straight back to the UK not thinking what if and you settle straight back into your old life.

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32 minutes ago, Lavers said:

3girlmama

I've just started the process of applying for australia and I'll be taking my 2 daughters who will be 9 and 4 if all goes to plan.

 

At the end of the day I don't see it as as a risk, I either don't do it and I'll live the rest of my life thinking what if. We go and it's the best the decision we ever made after everything settles down or it's not what we thought and your on a flight straight back to the UK not thinking what if and you settle straight back into your old life.

On a flight straight back to the UK about £30k worse off and without a home to go to, not being able to get the kids into their old schools, without a job...

Edited by Jon the Hat

PR (100) planning to move to Perth by then end of 2019!

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