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Indianinoz

Contributory parent visa

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Hello everyone,

I'm sure this would have been discussed but because laws keep changing, I'd like to post afresh.

Me and my wife are in Australia on a PR visa. Its been about 30 months(2.5 years) now in Australia for us. I'm planning to apply for a contributory visa for my parents(both mother and father). I understand it involves a lot of cost.

My questions:
a) Which is the visa no. for this kind of an application? How long is the processing time?
b) How much fee needs to be paid? Is any part of this fee a deposit which is refundable? Does a major portion of the fee need to be paid on application or is it when the visa is granted?
c) Is there any bridging visa available until visa is granted?
d) Is Medicare available to them once visa is granted? What about Medicare for any bridging visa, if any?
e) Will they have full work rights when visa is granted? What about working rights on bridging visa, if available?
f) Any other restrictions once the PR visa is granted? Like I heard for a certain no. of years they're not eligible for Aged pension or some kind of Centrelink benefits????

Thank you!

Edited by Indianinoz

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Also, is applying for the temporary visa and then the PR visa a better way to achieve this?

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The visa you want to look at is 143

The total cost of the visa is about $125,000 for two parents. Be aware this may increase soon. None of that is refundable. 

If applied on shore, a bridging visa would be granted. 

If applied on shore, very limited Medicare may be available. 

Once a visa is granted they would receive full Medicare. 

They would have work rights once granted. It is a PR visa. They would not be automatically granted work rights on a bridging visa. 

They would have no access to benefits while on a bridging visa and limited access for two years after grant. The current processing time is about 4 years, but this may increase significantly. 

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47 minutes ago, VERYSTORMY said:

The visa you want to look at is 143

The total cost of the visa is about $125,000 for two parents. Be aware this may increase soon. None of that is refundable. 

If applied on shore, a bridging visa would be granted. 

If applied on shore, very limited Medicare may be available. 

Once a visa is granted they would receive full Medicare. 

They would have work rights once granted. It is a PR visa. They would not be automatically granted work rights on a bridging visa. 

They would have no access to benefits while on a bridging visa and limited access for two years after grant. The current processing time is about 4 years, but this may increase significantly. 

Thanks Verystormy. When is the $125,000 payable? Is it payable on application or payable when granted i.e. roughly 4 years later?

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Verystormy: You make two references in your comment about two things increasing in the near future? The cost of the 143, and the waiting / queueing (is that a word??) times. We are just getting started on our journey to Oz via the 143, is this just speculation? Or is there something happening we are not aware of. Many thanks for your time.

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5 hours ago, Indianinoz said:

Thanks Verystormy. When is the $125,000 payable? Is it payable on application or payable when granted i.e. roughly 4 years later?

It is payable in a couple of instalments, with the majority paid just before grant. 

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1 hour ago, Sharpeys said:

Verystormy: You make two references in your comment about two things increasing in the near future? The cost of the 143, and the waiting / queueing (is that a word??) times. We are just getting started on our journey to Oz via the 143, is this just speculation? Or is there something happening we are not aware of. Many thanks for your time.

Visa costs go up every year, normally in July. The wait times have been steadily increasing for some time, a couple of years ago, it was about two years. Today it is four years. The government have made it clear that it isn't a fan of parent migration full stop, so, it will slip further down the priority list for the department. 

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The 143 is only an off-shore visa, so no opportunity for a bridging visa. Also the queue is now approximately 47,000 with only 6218 visas granted last year. So possibly 6 or 7 years for processing.

There is also a Contributory Aged Parent visa (subclass 864) for +65.5 year olds, which is an on-shore visa and has the bridging option. The processing time is also shorter for this visa.

I would strongly recommend not going down the temporary route (173 or 884 visas), as the extra time for processing is unpredictable.

Edited by SusieRoo
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173 Visa lodged - March 2016

(Big mistake in applying for a 173 and now realise we should have gone directly for a 143)

Expected 173 visa grant date - March 2021

Expected 143 visa grant date - December 2023

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I applied for a 143 contributor visa August 2014 granted November 2018, paid $43,600, single person, visa granted 12 days later, approximately 

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2 hours ago, Debs54 said:

I applied for a 143 contributor visa August 2014 granted November 2018, paid $43,600, single person, visa granted 12 days later, approximately

Edited by Tulip1

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Yours took longer than most others on here. People who applied early/spring of 2015 have their visas already yet you applied Aug 2014 and have only just received yours?

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Hi everyone, I was reading all your comments and all of them very useful.I just started looking at my Mum's visa and my question is: Can she travel with bridging visa and if she can for how long she can be out of Oz? Won't she has Medicare during the bridging visa at all? 

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Posted (edited)
27 minutes ago, Layla said:

 Can she travel with bridging visa and if she can for how long she can be out of Oz? Won't she has Medicare during the bridging visa at all? 

She’ll have to apply for permission every time she wants to leave Australia and she’ll have to show a good reason for needing to travel, e.g. wedding, funeral etc. 

She’ll be covered for essential treatment only, assuming she was a UK resident immediately before moving to Australia 

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 01/06/2018 at 17:39, SusieRoo said:

The 143 is only an off-shore visa, so no opportunity for a bridging visa. Also the queue is now approximately 47,000 with only 6218 visas granted last year. So possibly 6 or 7 years for processing.

There is also a Contributory Aged Parent visa (subclass 864) for +65.5 year olds, which is an on-shore visa and has the bridging option. The processing time is also shorter for this visa.

I would strongly recommend not going down the temporary route (173 or 884 visas), as the extra time for processing is unpredictable.

Hi I'm new to the forum but am interested in the comment above.  I am over 65.5 but my wife is under.  We were thinking that she should apply for a contributory parent visa (and me being a dependent) rather than me applying for an aged contributory visa (and her being a dependent).  Could anyone advise if there would be an advantage to apply this way or vice versa?  SusieRoo says there is a shorter processing time for the aged visa which may be an advantage.  Is this correct?  I do not see that mentioned elsewhere.  Neither of us live in AUs at the moment and do not really intend to until my wife's mother passes (she is over 100 atm).

Thanks for your help

 

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2 hours ago, Norman and Estelle said:

Hi I'm new to the forum but am interested in the comment above.  I am over 65.5 but my wife is under.  We were thinking that she should apply for a contributory parent visa (and me being a dependent) rather than me applying for an aged contributory visa (and her being a dependent).  Could anyone advise if there would be an advantage to apply this way or vice versa?  SusieRoo says there is a shorter processing time for the aged visa which may be an advantage.  Is this correct?  I do not see that mentioned elsewhere.  Neither of us live in AUs at the moment and do not really intend to until my wife's mother passes (she is over 100 atm).

Thanks for your help

 

Neither of you can be a dependent of the other, you both have to apply for and pay for a parent visa regardless of which one you go for

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Hi Tulip1 I appreciate that but as I understand it we can apply by one of us being the first applicant and the other being the second applicant on the form.  Maybe dependent was not the right word.  But do you if the processing time for an aged contributory parent visa is less than the ordinary contributory visa?

Thanks 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Norman and Estelle said:

Hi I'm new to the forum but am interested in the comment above.  I am over 65.5 but my wife is under.  We were thinking that she should apply for a contributory parent visa (and me being a dependent) rather than me applying for an aged contributory visa (and her being a dependent).  Could anyone advise if there would be an advantage to apply this way or vice versa?  SusieRoo says there is a shorter processing time for the aged visa which may be an advantage.  Is this correct?  I do not see that mentioned elsewhere.  Neither of us live in AUs at the moment and do not really intend to until my wife's mother passes (she is over 100 atm).

Thanks for your help

 

Welcome to the forum

The current parent visa assessment dates are as follows,

1285690187_Screenshot2019-04-1419_18_51.thumb.png.fc30fd125ee5687d614ed8df2ef8d357.png

You can see the ‘Aged’ 864 visas are still being processed earlier than the 143 visas. but they have slowed recently. And there is now a suspicion that processing times may become aligned in the future.

The number of application for all categories of parent visa are growing year on year and the number of places available has been reduced this year. So you would need to expect 7 or 8 years (possibly longer) for a new application.

Also the eligibility age for a 864 visa is changing this year to 66.

638783419_Screenshot2019-04-1419_32_05.thumb.png.c6c670e7f445b88591ae12c643e6dfe1.png

You must be in Australia when you apply for a 864 visa and you also can remain in Australia on a bridging visa while the application is processed. But with a 143 visa you cannot get a bridging visa and need to reside outside of Australia while waiting for your visa. Unfortunately you cannot change from a 143 to a 864 visa without starting a new application and going to the back of the queue.

Because of your circumstances (with a fantastic centenarian) you will need to consider carefully which visa will most suitable. I am not an expert and you will undoubtedly be richer talking to an immigration agent (like Alan Collet @Alan Collett).

Personally I would apply for a 103 visa now, which you can later switch to a Contributory Parent Visa (without loosing queue position) and then gain a bridging visa if circumstances allow.  

Edited by SusieRoo
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173 Visa lodged - March 2016

(Big mistake in applying for a 173 and now realise we should have gone directly for a 143)

Expected 173 visa grant date - March 2021

Expected 143 visa grant date - December 2023

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Hi, I'm also new to the forum and very interested to understand more. Perhaps someone can assist me. The father of my son (5) wants to come and live in Australia, we are not together but my understanding is he can apply for the parent 103 visa or the contributory 143 visa is that correct? Is there any other that he could apply for and would this be having my son as his sponsor? Can I sponsor him not being his partner? Thank you so much. 

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2 hours ago, KerriAnne said:

Hi, I'm also new to the forum and very interested to understand more. Perhaps someone can assist me. The father of my son (5) wants to come and live in Australia, we are not together but my understanding is he can apply for the parent 103 visa or the contributory 143 visa is that correct? Is there any other that he could apply for and would this be having my son as his sponsor? Can I sponsor him not being his partner? Thank you so much. 

Your child has to be 18 or over to be sponsor.  I would get some advice from a migration agent.  Are you able to meet the financial obligations of being a sponsor for your ex?  If needed, you would be responsible for providing accommodation, financial assistance


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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There is one thing missing in your questionary.

Are  your parents meeting the family balance test?  https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/contributory-aged-parent-864/balance-of-family-test

So you are either an only child or at least 50% of your siblings are residing in Australia? This is the make or break of any permanent Australian parent visas.


IELTS 01/2011; TRA 03/2011; SS SA 05/2011; visa 176 lodged 06/2011; visa granted 08/2011; arrived in Adelaide 02/2012; Australian citizen 08/2016

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5 hours ago, KerriAnne said:

Hi, I'm also new to the forum and very interested to understand more. Perhaps someone can assist me. The father of my son (5) wants to come and live in Australia, we are not together but my understanding is he can apply for the parent 103 visa or the contributory 143 visa is that correct? Is there any other that he could apply for and would this be having my son as his sponsor? Can I sponsor him not being his partner? Thank you so much. 

Welcome to the forum. Yes, I think your son’s dad will be able eligible for a parent visa. Although there are a number of conditions that would need to be met. You may also be able to be the sponsor, given your son is under 18.

I’m not an expert so I would recommend you seek guidance from a registered migration agent (like Alan Collet @Alan Collett).

Also, you will have to consider your sons best interests carefully and you will always be able to veto this application if necessary. Remember that any class of parent visa is likely to take about 10 years to process, which will be stressful and possibly unsettling.

Personally speaking, I would avoid doing this now (like the plague) and I would let my son make his own decisions when he reaches 18.


173 Visa lodged - March 2016

(Big mistake in applying for a 173 and now realise we should have gone directly for a 143)

Expected 173 visa grant date - March 2021

Expected 143 visa grant date - December 2023

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Hi everyone,

We want to apply for my Mum who is 64 years old (she was born in August 1954) to the Visa 864 (contributory aged parent visa) so my questions are:

  1. Do we need to wait until she is turning 66 which is the age pension or  Can we apply for the visa now? Because what I understand is the queue for the visa is 7 years so we don't want to waste time.

  2. If we have to wait 2 more years until she eligible to apply for 864 visa. Can we ask for one year tourism visa before we apply for 864 visa or it doesn't look good?

Thank you in advance for your help 

Layla

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8 hours ago, Layla said:

Hi everyone,

We want to apply for my Mum who is 64 years old (she was born in August 1954) to the Visa 864 (contributory aged parent visa) so my questions are:

  1. Do we need to wait until she is turning 66 which is the age pension or  Can we apply for the visa now? Because what I understand is the queue for the visa is 7 years so we don't want to waste time.

  2. If we have to wait 2 more years until she eligible to apply for 864 visa. Can we ask for one year tourism visa before we apply for 864 visa or it doesn't look good?

You can't apply for the visa until she's eligible so you can't apply until she turns 66.   Nothing to stop you applying for tourist visas in the meantime.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Thank you for taking your time to reply Marisa.

I really appreciate it.

Have a nice day 

 

 

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