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CTM5198

Am I crazy for preferring England over Australia?

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Hi! So I’m a 20 year old uni student and I moved out to Sydney with my parents in late 2013. Recently, I’ve been feeling extremely homesick and thankfully I’m going back home for a visit in July. I’ve been homesick to the extent that I’ve been making jokes about not coming back to Australia after my trip. One thing that is kinda bothering me is that I feel like an outlier or a weirdo, missing the UK & preferring it over Australia. I feel like I have to justify myself to other Brits (and never really Aussies), especially to those back in the UK who seem to have a television snapshot of Australian life. I get that we all have our various preferences, likes and dislikes but are my reasons rational? Australia is beautiful, I must admit, but my reasons the aspects I miss about the UK certainly outweigh the positives of Australia. Is this natural? 

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Plenty of people feel the same way.  If you prefer the UK, you can move back to work and live there once you finish uni.  See how you feel after your visit in July.  

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6 minutes ago, Toots said:

Plenty of people feel the same way.  If you prefer the UK, you can move back to work and live there once you finish uni.  See how you feel after your visit in July.  

That’s good to hear! And yeah I’ll treat this visit as a ‘taster’ and see where my feelings lie. And yes you’re right, probably best to finish uni here first (or else I’d be paying international fees back home thanks to the 3-year residency rule for home fees).

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1 minute ago, CTM5198 said:

That’s good to hear! And yeah I’ll treat this visit as a ‘taster’ and see where my feelings lie. And yes you’re right, probably best to finish uni here first (or else I’d be paying international fees back home thanks to the 3-year residency rule for home fees).

It would also be very handy if  you have your Australian citizenship before you decide to return to the UK.  :)

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13 minutes ago, Toots said:

It would also be very handy if  you have your Australian citizenship before you decide to return to the UK.  :)

Yep definitely! :)

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No your not crazy! I have been here (Adelaide) just shy of a decade and am now starting to feel the urge to go home. I know the U.k isnt perfect and it has its problems but there are somethings that are wonderful about it. The culture, the seasons (hate the hot weather) being so close the europe, a traditional English pub!!.  Australia is beautiful but Ive never felt like I belong here - I dont understand the people or there mentality, I think if you are an older person with a young family it would be a wonderful place to raise a young family but as a young-er person I miss all that the U.K and Europe has to offer. Just my 2 cents

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It’s quite normal. Tbh you came out with your parents as a kid. It wasn’t your choice to make ultimately.

I’d go with where you feel happy and settled and can call home. May be the UK, may be  Aus and may be somewhere else entirely if you do some travelling or some such and find a place you love and want to spend some time living in. I’d have your trip back and see how you feel after retuning to Aus. Plus you have a uni course to complete I’d guess so you most likely can’t rush into anything. But you can plan for the not too distant future :) 

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Let's face it, both countries have problems!   Every country has good points and bad points, so it comes down to a matter of personal taste.  I know what you mean about British people having a television idea of Australia.  I also think too many Brits assume that just because the weather is sunny, it must automatically be a lovely place to live - when there's so much more than weather to consider.  Look at the number of British people who move to Spain or Italy in their retirement - more than half of them move back when they realise that weather isn't everything.

I can see the pro's and con's of both countries and on balance, Australia just wins for me.  Other people will look at the good and bad and choose the UK.   And some will feel an instinctive pull to one or the other.   We're all different so don't let anyone tell you which one you "should" choose.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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2 hours ago, CTM5198 said:

Hi! So I’m a 20 year old uni student and I moved out to Sydney with my parents in late 2013. Recently, I’ve been feeling extremely homesick and thankfully I’m going back home for a visit in July. I’ve been homesick to the extent that I’ve been making jokes about not coming back to Australia after my trip. One thing that is kinda bothering me is that I feel like an outlier or a weirdo, missing the UK & preferring it over Australia. I feel like I have to justify myself to other Brits (and never really Aussies), especially to those back in the UK who seem to have a television snapshot of Australian life. I get that we all have our various preferences, likes and dislikes but are my reasons rational? Australia is beautiful, I must admit, but my reasons the aspects I miss about the UK certainly outweigh the positives of Australia. Is this natural? 

What are you studying at university? Some degrees it's easier to get work without experience than others. Especially if you are not in the country you graduated from. Also, the bigger the university the more chance someone has heard about it.

Edited by newjez
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Nearly there! Don't drop the ball now guys! Vaccines are weeks away. Stay safe!

 

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Depends who you meet where you feel comfortable.  If you don't relate to people where you are, you're not going to like it. Simple as that  in some cases.

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20 would be a difficult time to move. You had your way of life sorted, mates, sense of humour, fashion, music, sport.

Come here and everythings different, even your haircut might look a bit strange. You are maybe trying to get on with guys your age who've been surfing, skateboarding and playing aussie rules or rugby all their lives.

It's bound to be tough. Girls would be totally different too.

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Yes. Bonkers.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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7 hours ago, Metalhead_89 said:

No your not crazy! I have been here (Adelaide) just shy of a decade and am now starting to feel the urge to go home. I know the U.k isnt perfect and it has its problems but there are somethings that are wonderful about it. The culture, the seasons (hate the hot weather) being so close the europe, a traditional English pub!!.  Australia is beautiful but Ive never felt like I belong here - I dont understand the people or there mentality, I think if you are an older person with a young family it would be a wonderful place to raise a young family but as a young-er person I miss all that the U.K and Europe has to offer. Just my 2 cents

Yeah I agree. Every country has its flaws but it’s the things that make the UK unique, that makes me miss home, no matter how crappy the weather can be :D (I can’t stand the heat either). 

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7 hours ago, snifter said:

It’s quite normal. Tbh you came out with your parents as a kid. It wasn’t your choice to make ultimately.

I’d go with where you feel happy and settled and can call home. May be the UK, may be  Aus and may be somewhere else entirely if you do some travelling or some such and find a place you love and want to spend some time living in. I’d have your trip back and see how you feel after retuning to Aus. Plus you have a uni course to complete I’d guess so you most likely can’t rush into anything. But you can plan for the not too distant future :) 

Yeah that’s true. And yeah it’s funny to think that I came here as a naive 15 year old and still have an attachment to home. I’m still young I guess so no hurry...

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7 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Let's face it, both countries have problems!   Every country has good points and bad points, so it comes down to a matter of personal taste.  I know what you mean about British people having a television idea of Australia.  I also think too many Brits assume that just because the weather is sunny, it must automatically be a lovely place to live - when there's so much more than weather to consider.  Look at the number of British people who move to Spain or Italy in their retirement - more than half of them move back when they realise that weather isn't everything.

I can see the pro's and con's of both countries and on balance, Australia just wins for me.  Other people will look at the good and bad and choose the UK.   And some will feel an instinctive pull to one or the other.   We're all different so don't let anyone tell you which one you "should" choose.

Yeah I’ve heard people describe Australia as “Just a Sunny Britain” but that’s obviously not the most accurate description xD. All I can say is good for you! Good to hear that Australia is working well for you. An interesting insight, thanks for that!

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6 hours ago, newjez said:

What are you studying at university? Some degrees it's easier to get work without experience than others. Especially if you are not in the country you graduated from. Also, the bigger the university the more chance someone has heard about it.

I’m doing a double degree in Law & Business at Western Sydney University Parramatta, which is of course not the best of unis nor would it be as universally recognised as the Russell Group or Red Brick unis in the UK. From what I hear though, it’s harder to qualify as a lawyer in the UK due to the training contract requirement, but jobs are probably less competitive than in Australia due to a bigger legal market.

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2 hours ago, Paul1Perth said:

20 would be a difficult time to move. You had your way of life sorted, mates, sense of humour, fashion, music, sport.

Come here and everythings different, even your haircut might look a bit strange. You are maybe trying to get on with guys your age who've been surfing, skateboarding and playing aussie rules or rugby all their lives.

It's bound to be tough. Girls would be totally different too.

I get what you mean. I am already being told over Skype that my accent has changed so that’s not a good start :/... 

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1 hour ago, CTM5198 said:

And yeah it’s funny to think that I came here as a naive 15 year old and still have an attachment to home. I’m still young I guess so no hurry...

I don't think it's strange at all.  After all, you've spent three quarters of your life in the UK so it's a major part of your identity and probably will remain so for the rest of your life....wherever you end up.  This stage of your life - well, once you've graduated - when you are unencumbered by relationships, children, mortgage etc. is when you are free to travel and live anywhere.  That is how you really discover yourself and what suits you as an individual.   Don't feel you have to justify yourself to anyone...you don't need their permission....just do what feels right for you.  

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1 hour ago, Skani said:

I don't think it's strange at all.  After all, you've spent three quarters of your life in the UK so it's a major part of your identity and probably will remain so for the rest of your life....wherever you end up.  This stage of your life - well, once you've graduated - when you are unencumbered by relationships, children, mortgage etc. is when you are free to travel and live anywhere.  That is how you really discover yourself and what suits you as an individual.   Don't feel you have to justify yourself to anyone...you don't need their permission....just do what feels right for you.  

Some wise words there... Thank you! :)

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Nope, you’re not bonkers! I agree with what the others have said - the world is your oyster, you’re lucky you can make a choice once you’re done with Uni. My eldest always thought of himself as an Aussie even though he was born in UK and we moved to Aus when he was 6 months old. He went to U.K. on a post uni gap year holiday in 2002! He’s like a pig in muck, has a good job, a house and a family and can’t even be bothered to renew his Aussie passport. (Maybe it’s his genetic memory ..... discussed in another thread about “belonging”).  You should be ok with Aussie degree qualifications but the magic word “honours” might be a good insurance when you’re looking at comparing against UK graduates.  

It wont be the same as you remember but it’ll be a new adventure!

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10 hours ago, CTM5198 said:

Yeah that’s true. And yeah it’s funny to think that I came here as a naive 15 year old and still have an attachment to home. I’m still young I guess so no hurry...

I reckon that 15 would be a tricky age to migrate and adapt.....particularly given that at that age it is not your decision to come in the first place.  It is why we emigrated 3 years ago when our daughter was 11 rather than wait until this year which would have been better for us (work and money reasons).

She did not initially want to come but has assimilated very well, is happy, and rarely mentions England now.  I doubt that would have been the case if we had waited until she was 14/15.

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Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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I think you're at a good age to explore and travel.  Having duel citizenship doesn't close any doors to you and if you find that living/working in the UK isn't what you want after a few years, you can always return to Aus.

My son was 7 when we migrated and despite remembering very little about living in the UK retains his Englishness whilst his sister who was 11 describes herself as an English born Australian.  My son (now 18) travelled back to the UK with his Dad in January for his birthday trip which was a football tour - he absolutely loved it, but did say that he didn't think he could live there - he was too cold (lol) and felt a little closed in.

Life is for living and nothing ventured nothing gained - it's a great opportunity when you finish your degree.

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I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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3 hours ago, Quoll said:

Nope, you’re not bonkers! I agree with what the others have said - the world is your oyster, you’re lucky you can make a choice once you’re done with Uni. My eldest always thought of himself as an Aussie even though he was born in UK and we moved to Aus when he was 6 months old. He went to U.K. on a post uni gap year holiday in 2002! He’s like a pig in muck, has a good job, a house and a family and can’t even be bothered to renew his Aussie passport. (Maybe it’s his genetic memory ..... discussed in another thread about “belonging”).  You should be ok with Aussie degree qualifications but the magic word “honours” might be a good insurance when you’re looking at comparing against UK graduates.  

It wont be the same as you remember but it’ll be a new adventure!

That’s really funny though, how it didn’t take 2 seconds for him to re-integrate into British life xD. An honours is definitely something I was planning, just to have that competitive edge.

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2 hours ago, Gbye grey sky said:

I reckon that 15 would be a tricky age to migrate and adapt.....particularly given that at that age it is not your decision to come in the first place.  It is why we emigrated 3 years ago when our daughter was 11 rather than wait until this year which would have been better for us (work and money reasons).

She did not initially want to come but has assimilated very well, is happy, and rarely mentions England now.  I doubt that would have been the case if we had waited until she was 14/15.

Yeah cos at 15, you’re kinda at the point where people have already forged their relationships and connections since primary school or at the beginning of secondary school and are about to dissipate for university.

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2 hours ago, ali said:

I think you're at a good age to explore and travel.  Having duel citizenship doesn't close any doors to you and if you find that living/working in the UK isn't what you want after a few years, you can always return to Aus.

My son was 7 when we migrated and despite remembering very little about living in the UK retains his Englishness whilst his sister who was 11 describes herself as an English born Australian.  My son (now 18) travelled back to the UK with his Dad in January for his birthday trip which was a football tour - he absolutely loved it, but did say that he didn't think he could live there - he was too cold (lol) and felt a little closed in.

Life is for living and nothing ventured nothing gained - it's a great opportunity when you finish your degree.

Yeah I’ve heard stories about people going back to the UK for a visit, and experiencing a reverse culture shock - “omg I can’t believe I actually used to live here, in this cold, crowded place with monotonous-looking houses”. 

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