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Mandy3112

Applying for a work permit

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Hi all, 

 

I am currently on a bva wa, waiting on my application for last remaining relative. I understand that I have no work rights and the processing time for this Visa is around 8 years. I need to apply for a work permit and I have no idea where to start. Has anyone done this that can give me some advice?

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Agree with Quoll, everything I can find says the waiting time is 50 years.  


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Processing is over 50 years. Effectively the rest of your life. So, for the rest of your life you will only have reciprocal healthcare. This is very different to full Medicare. So, you will spend your life with reduced healthcare. You will have no access to state benefits. You and any children will be regarded as international students. When the time comes for you to retire you will not be eligible for a state pension. 

To cap it all, I personally think it will be abolished in the not too distant future. In the past when this has occurred, it includes those who have applied. 

Have you researched this properly? 

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Hi!

 

Yes, I have done thorough research on this and have been advised by immigration that the processing time for this Visa, when applying on-shore is around 8 years at present. 

I am happy enough to have the reduced health care and pay for private health care. In comparison to the NHS in the uk, it's better. 

I'm 28 at the moment, so pensions aren't a concern just yet. As long as I have a work permit i am not fussed about the financial side of things. 

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Never ever take advice from immigration. It is usually wrong. When you speak to immigration you are speaking to a call centre staff with little training. Hence, the department have a legal indemnity for giving bad / wrong advice. The departments official position is you should have consulted a registered migration agent  

The current processing is 50 plus years and has been growing for some time (it was 30 years when I started on the forum). 

Private health does not provide a free healthcare  far from it. Copayments can be in the thousands  it also doesn't cover many things such as most drugs  

To get right to work you will need to prove hardship  

 

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I see, thank you for the info. 

How do i go about doing that? Do i write them a letter to ask for a work permit and attach proof that i am in financial hardship? 

i've looked online and cant find anything at all. 

 

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22 minutes ago, Mandy3112 said:

I see, thank you for the info. 

How do i go about doing that? Do i write them a letter to ask for a work permit and attach proof that i am in financial hardship? 

i've looked online and cant find anything at all. 

 

Have you used the search terms like 'financial hardship on BVA' or some such. You will get plenty of info. 

This may be the form you are looking for.

https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/Forms/Documents/1005.pdf

However, given your situation and circumstances, you may well be better served running your case past a reputable migration agent to discuss things and ensure you know what is what with this visa and its processing, pitfalls and so on. Did you consult with one before you went down this path and if so, what did they advise?

 

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Yes, ive got it thank you.

 

Yes, i got advise from several and they all advised it was possible but i was choosing a difficult route. Unfortunately for us this was the only option available and i made the decision to just go for it. 

I was aware my biggest hurdle would be the length of time it would take to be processed, but as long as i can work i can manage. 

Everything else has worked out so far so fingers crossed im doing the right thing!

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1 minute ago, Mandy3112 said:

Yes, ive got it thank you.

 

Yes, i got advise from several and they all advised it was possible but i was choosing a difficult route. Unfortunately for us this was the only option available and i made the decision to just go for it. 

I was aware my biggest hurdle would be the length of time it would take to be processed, but as long as i can work i can manage. 

Everything else has worked out so far so fingers crossed im doing the right thing!

You have chosen a difficult route. Plus with school fees (I read on another thread about that) on top that will add up. 

I have no idea if your application for the work rights to be changed will be successful or not. I hope you have some savings and a back up plan if not. 

 

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3 minutes ago, snifter said:

You have chosen a difficult route. Plus with school fees (I read on another thread about that) on top that will add up. 

I have no idea if your application for the work rights to be changed will be successful or not. I hope you have some savings and a back up plan if not. 

 

Yeah, it really does rack up.

Especially with the cost of the application itself.

So now i have a nice 50 year wait on my hands, wish me luck! 

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3 hours ago, Mandy3112 said:

Yeah, it really does rack up.

Especially with the cost of the application itself.

So now i have a nice 50 year wait on my hands, wish me luck! 

Its not just you though, you obviously have at least one child, as you have asked about schools - what happens when the kids leave school? international fees for university, restrictions on leaving the country, they would need to apply for their own work restrictions to be lifted........

I wish you luck with it all. 

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4 hours ago, Mandy3112 said:

Yeah, it really does rack up.

Especially with the cost of the application itself.

So now i have a nice 50 year wait on my hands, wish me luck! 

Have you thought about, maybe, a longer term plan? A return to U.K. in the short term where education and health care will be free and you look at getting qualifications in something that would be likely to get you a skilled PR visa in your own right. It might take you 5 years but, surely, that would be better than living in limbo with the threat of removal hanging over your head for potentially the rest of your life especially if you think you’ve got the perfect life thing going on. It’d be tough to be booted out several years down the track because of any one of a number of possible scenarios (the government changes the goalposts, you develop a medical condition, you’re unable to find work on a very insubstantial visa etc etc)

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10 hours ago, Quoll said:

Have you thought about, maybe, a longer term plan? A return to U.K. in the short term where education and health care will be free and you look at getting qualifications in something that would be likely to get you a skilled PR visa in your own right. It might take you 5 years but, surely, that would be better than living in limbo with the threat of removal hanging over your head for potentially the rest of your life 

That concerns me too.  There was another visa that was abolished a while ago, and everyone on the waiting list had their bridging visas cancelled and they had to leave the country.  Some of them had been living in Australia for years, but there was no way for them to stay.

I would say there's an extremely high risk that the Remaining Relative visa will be abolished at some point during your 50 year wait, and you will be deported.What happens if it's not abolished until you're over 45, so you've got no hope of applying for any kind of skilled visa?  Don't imagine that because you've lived in Australia for 20 years or whatever, you'll get some kind of special dispensation - it doesn't happen.

I say there's an extremely high risk of it being abolished because, let's face it, it's absurd to offer a visa that takes a lifetime to get.  It's bleeding obvious they're trying to discourage people from applying for it.  I suspect the reason they didn't abolish it in the past was a fear of negative publicity - we're an immigrant nation, and they don't want to sound heartless.  However, there's a strong anti-immigration feeling in the electorate right now, so the government feels free to make cutbacks - and is doing so.   They've already made changes, including making it very hard for parents to join their children, and more changes are expected.  In fact, they've said even skilled migration will be cut back, so what do you think the chances for family migration are?  

If you're content to think, "at least I'll get a few years with my family before they boot me out", then your current plan of action is fine.  But in the current climate, I fear that's all you'll be likely to get.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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17 hours ago, Mandy3112 said:

I am happy enough to have the reduced health care and pay for private health care. In comparison to the NHS in the uk, it's better. 

 

Have you organised your private health care yet?   Because you don't have PR, you will have to pay at international rates, not the rates Australians pay.  Also, be aware it's not the same as the UK - there is always an excess (called a "gap") to pay when you have treatment. So, for instance, I needed an op on my neck.  It cost $35,000 and the insurance only paid $25,000 of that.

Also, if you or your child get seriously ill, you used to be able to go back to the UK and get treatment on the NHS.   They've recently changed that, because they were fed up of British expats (who'd moved permanently to Spain or Italy and therefore no longer paying UK taxes) hopping back to the UK for free health care.  Now, you can't get treatment on the NHS unless you've established residency.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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We have to have private health as we are temporary residents here. Don't know if it will be the same for the OP, but we have limited private health care options, and the cost is very high. I think just Medibank and Bupa will give us cover? On our cover we do get everything back, we have no gap, but boy does it cost, and it was increased by 42%!!!! Recently. Its one of the reasons quite a few people are leaving. I suggest the OP looks into exactly which private health care she would be able to get on a long term bridging visa and think about how much cost of living will increase long term on limited funds.

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3 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Have you organised your private health care yet?   Because you don't have PR, you will have to pay at international rates, not the rates Australians pay.  Also, be aware it's not the same as the UK - there is always an excess (called a "gap") to pay when you have treatment. So, for instance, I needed an op on my neck.  It cost $35,000 and the insurance only paid $25,000 of that.

Also, if you or your child get seriously ill, you used to be able to go back to the UK and get treatment on the NHS.   They've recently changed that, because they were fed up of British expats (who'd moved permanently to Spain or Italy and therefore no longer paying UK taxes) hopping back to the UK for free health care.  Now, you can't get treatment on the NHS unless you've established residency.

I have a few back up plans in place. My concern isn't any of the above, these issues have all been addressed before and during my application. I know the risks involved and the likelyhood of the changes the govt may make.

I was looking for advice on how best to approach applying for a work permit. 

Thank you for all of the input, my application is being sent of today with crossed fingers. 

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17 minutes ago, Mandy3112 said:

I have a few back up plans in place. My concern isn't any of the above, these issues have all been addressed before and during my application. I know the risks involved and the likelyhood of the changes the govt may make

Glad to hear it.  I know you didn't ask about those things, but we tend to offer information even when it's not asked for, for one simple reason - as Rumsfeld almost said, people can't ask what they don't know they need to know.  We get people posting here all the time, asking for the solution to one problem.  We don't want them to go merrily off, thinking they've got it solved, but blissfully unaware there are other snags they haven't thought about.  

For instance, I can think of someone posting here a while back, who had a question about renting out their Australian home on returning to the UK.   I answered that question, then explained some of the tax implications.  He hadn't asked about that because he thought he knew the facts - but he didn't, and what I told him changed his plans.  If we'd all confined ourselves to just answering that one question, he would've made a very costly mistake.  So that's why we tend to offer advice over and above what's asked for.

Sorry if you felt we were giving you a hard time, but I'm sure you know you've chosen an exceptionally risky and very expensive path.  You can't blame people for thinking you may not have thought it through, and wanting to be sure you've got the full picture.

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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