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jobolt

Taking cats

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19 hours ago, jobolt said:

We've decided that we are taking two of our cats, the older ones won't cope and it would be selfish of us to put them through it, but the younger two have had their rabies vaccine yesterday so I've started the ball rolling...

We're in a difficult situation that my husband will potentially need to start his job mid January and therefore the two we are taking will have to go into a foster home until beg. of May until they are allowed to fly:( At least by that time we will have found a suitable rental and can provide a cat friendly area for them.

How old are the older ones?  Our cat was about 14 (from memory), we took her to the vet for advice - he did a 'geriatric work up' .. cost us about 100 pounds at the time but said that there was no reason she couldn't do the journey.  Her travel crate was really quite roomy, she had food and water during the flight and was looked after really well in Quarantine (it was 30 days then). 


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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On ‎10‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 10:11, Skani said:

What type of area will you be moving to?    It is possible to cat proof a fence so that they can't leave  your property, but that might be difficult if you are renting.  I have a "cat proofed" area in my back yard for my 3 cats which is the best of both worlds:  they can go outdoors but can't wander off the property and I know where they are at all times.    Re heat:  I certainly don't have problems with that as I live in Tasmania.  In warmer areas you will most probably have air conditioning and they will find a cool spot in the house if they are feeling uncomfortable.

Agree Skani,

We're in WA which is warm - our cat tended to find shade and liked lying on the tile floors - we always made sure there was water in doors and out doors. 


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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6 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Why?

 

Well most normal people love their pets as family members.

To tell someone to rehome their pet when they are already anxious or indecisive about bringing them - is pretty insensitive advice.

You don't tend to just rehome them unless you can help it (i.e.) the cat is very old and won't cope with the trip

Some councils like North Sydney council are stricter than others. Our local council just requires desexing, microchipping and registration. Which is sensible for anyone who cares for a cat anyway.  

Personally from what I have seen, humans do more damage to wildlife that cats do. For example : chopping down trees and areas wildlife live in, to build roads and houses.  Or polluting the waterways.

I have taken five cats through rentals and let them out during the day wearing bells, you can hear them coming from a mile off, and they cannot get close to wildlife. They have all lived to grand old ages. Even in a rental, you can easily put up a cat run in the garden to stop them wandering.

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11 hours ago, ali said:

How old are the older ones?  Our cat was about 14 (from memory), we took her to the vet for advice - he did a 'geriatric work up' .. cost us about 100 pounds at the time but said that there was no reason she couldn't do the journey.  Her travel crate was really quite roomy, she had food and water during the flight and was looked after really well in Quarantine (it was 30 days then). 

The older ones are 11 and 14, but both don't cope well with being kept indoors.  They're not the most chilled of cats and the older one is a very territorial male that would potentially cause issues in the neighbourhood.  It's nowhere near an easy decision, it has broken my heart, but is for the better of them and they have a wonderful new home to go to of someone they already know.

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15 hours ago, Tootsie said:

 

Well most normal people love their pets as family members.

To tell someone to rehome their pet when they are already anxious or indecisive about bringing them - is pretty insensitive advice.

I love animals too.  But most people who love animals love ALL animals, not just their cat. 

If someone brings an outdoor cat to Australia and allows it to roam outdoors here, it is going to kill wildlife.  If they rehome the cat, of course it will be a difficult and painful thing to do, but they will get over it.  If they bring the cat here, the birds and little mammals will be dead - they can never get over it. 

It would be pretty selfish and heartless of anyone to say the happiness of their cat is more important than the lives of other animals.

If they feel their cat could adapt to a more confined life, then they should bring it. I said that.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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We brought 2 cats to Perth from snow to 30 degrees within 2 days. They didn't enjoy the quarantine but luckily because of a bush fire they were released to home quarantine after 2 weeks.

At first we built a cat run and they went out doors - but we soon discovered that they just moved to a shady bush and seldom moved.

We then bought a large holiday apartment and found to our surprise that when we returned to the house, the cats still preferred inside living and would come in all the time. The apartment has 2 large balconies and they love sitting out there in the summer, looking out over the water.

There is no way we could have left them behind. They are registered, chipped as before. There is a curfew here at 10pm for cats but as I said ours have become indoor cats and there is no sign of them wanting to escape etc.

But there are great cat runs and a new roller bar system on top of the fence which a friend has installed which keeps cats in the run, and others out.

Yes there are people who think cats are terrible predators but they never talk about killing snakes, crows and other wild creatures that devour wild life. 

 

 

Edited by fosseboy
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1 hour ago, fosseboy said:

We brought 2 cats to Perth from snow to 30 degrees within 2 days. They didn't enjoy the quarantine but luckily because of a bush fire they were released to home quarantine after 2 weeks.

At first we built a cat run and they went out doors - but we soon discovered that they just moved to a shady bush and seldom moved.

We then bought a large holiday apartment and found to our surprise that when we returned to the house, the cats still preferred inside living and would come in all the time. The apartment has 2 large balconies and they love sitting out there in the summer, looking out over the water.

There is no way we could have left them behind. They are registered, chipped as before. There is a curfew here at 10pm for cats but as I said ours have become indoor cats and there is no sign of them wanting to escape etc.

But there are great cat runs and a new roller bar system on top of the fence which a friend has installed which keeps cats in the run, and others out.

Yes there are people who think cats are terrible predators but they never talk about killing snakes, crows and other wild creatures that devour wild life. 

 

 

I’ve seen these roller bars. Do they work?

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Yes roller bars work at a our friends house. Cheaper than some enclosures and you still have your outdoor area free of mesh.

There is a WA installer and a website and he had Oscillot rollers installed.

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10 hours ago, fosseboy said:

Yes there are people who think cats are terrible predators but they never talk about killing snakes, crows and other wild creatures that devour wild life. 

No, because snakes and birds kill only when they are hungry.    Cats are intelligent, curious creatures who will stalk and catch things for play, not necessarily to kill - and if they play with a small animal, they will injure it even though they have no intention of killing.   A cat out exploring could kill a whole clutch of ground-nesting baby birds and not eat one of them.  A snake or a bird would not.

Foxes would, but then we regard foxes as more of a problem than cats - they are also a non-native predator. 

Australian mainland wildlife evolved without foxes or cats and there was no equivalent predator, that's why they are more vulnerable than British wildlife.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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On 13/10/2018 at 23:25, Marisawright said:

If someone brings an outdoor cat to Australia and allows it to roam outdoors here, it is going to kill wildlife.  If they rehome the cat, of course it will be a difficult and painful thing to do, but they will get over it. 

I'm replying to an old post but only just needing to research pet transport.

This is a very sweeping statement which isn't true.  We have two middle-aged cats.  They do not have any interest in catching wildlife and sit happily next to the foxes in the garden.  They casually watch the birds and squirrels who seem to know they're not a threat.  Many cats lose the hunting instinct when they reach a certain age of around ten years or so.

People like us would not just "get over" rehoming their cat (at best) or worse putting them in a shelter for an uncertain future.  I could no more do that than rehome my children.

On 17/10/2018 at 02:35, Marisawright said:

No, because snakes and birds kill only when they are hungry.  Cats are intelligent, curious creatures who will stalk and catch things for play, not necessarily to kill.Foxes would, but then we regard foxes as more of a problem than cats - they are also a non-native predator. 

It never seems to be considered that many humans kill for fun and foxes were introduced by human immigrants.

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6 hours ago, jicms said:

I'm replying to an old post but only just needing to research pet transport.

This is a very sweeping statement which isn't true.  We have two middle-aged cats.  They do not have any interest in catching wildlife and sit happily next to the foxes in the garden.  They casually watch the birds and squirrels who seem to know they're not a threat.  Many cats lose the hunting instinct when they reach a certain age of around ten years or so.

People like us would not just "get over" rehoming their cat (at best) or worse putting them in a shelter for an uncertain future.  I could no more do that than rehome my children.

It never seems to be considered that many humans kill for fun and foxes were introduced by human immigrants.

I don't have cats but my neighbour has two.  They are middle aged and real characters and don't ever roam far from home and certainly not into the nearby bush type of areas.  They are both shut in at night.  Dogs with irresponsible owners cause more damage.  I witnessed a dog worrying a penguin on one of the local beaches the other day. 😡  I had a right go at the owner.  The poor little penguin died.   Apart from my neighbour's cats I haven't seen any others around.  They must all be indoor cats.

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3 hours ago, Toots said:

  Dogs with irresponsible owners cause more damage.  I witnessed a dog worrying a penguin on one of the local beaches the other day. 😡 

There have been some horrendous massacres of little penguins by dogs in Tas. lately.  Makes my blood boil. 😡   And recently there have been reports of Asian tourists at  Bicheno poking sticks down their burrows so they can take selfies with them!   😡    I'd be censored if I said what I'd really like to both dog owners and tourists.

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That's so sad about the penguins. I'd be distraught to witness that. As far as I know sadly there are no penguins in Sydney.

My daughter's two cats are indoor apartment cats in Sydney. She specifically chose them for rehoming as they had never been outside. She's taken them to the park for a stroll on leads. One quite enjoyed it but the other was terrified.

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309/100 applied 17.03.18 offshore (London), medical clearance 24.03.18, ACRO 01.05.18, sponsor's UK & Aus police checks requested 18.10.18, uploaded 04.11.18. 309/100 granted 30.11.18. Validated 15.03.19.

British citizen, husband Australian, 2 dual nationality children

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5 minutes ago, laf said:

That's so sad about the penguins. I'd be distraught to witness that. As far as I know sadly there are no penguins in Sydney.

My daughter's two cats are indoor apartment cats in Sydney. She specifically chose them for rehoming as they had never been outside. She's taken them to the park for a stroll on leads. One quite enjoyed it but the other was terrified.

My neighbour's cats Bowie and Cliff both go for walks on leads.  They also let her bath them!!  I've never known  cats quite like them.  

She went out one day and forgot to leave the laundry door open where their litter tray is.  One of the cats did it's business in the bath and covered it up with a tissue.  😶

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Hi Everyone

Not really looking for any particular advice but just thought I could pour my heart out to like-minded people! I have had an unexpected job offer that means I will be starting in 3 months. I know that the process for moving a pet requires 6 months for the rabies tests. I want to bring my 4 year old black cat called Mildred with us but I feel sick to my stomach thinking about her scared on a long flight before going into quarantine, thinking that we've given up on her.

She is a pretty resilient cat, she was a rescue kicked out at 1 when she became pregnant and we took her and her kittens in. She is very needy and gets stressed, so it's bad enough thinking about 3 months of finding her somewhere to stay when we've gone, let alone the journey.

Can anyone put my mind at ease about the cage size and also the accommodation she will need to stay in the other end? Will she have lots of space? Will she be nearby dogs? Do people interact with the animals during their 10 day stay?

Any reassurance to put my stressed mind at ease would be gratefully received 🙂

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We brought our old cat over with us 4 yrs ago. He was 12 yrs old at the time. I worried about him as he was old and nervous.

 

As it happened, he survived the journey very well. When we arrived to collect him after the quarantine period, the kennel maid was giving him a cuddle. We had expected to find him hiding in his kennel, but no, here he was with his new best friend lol.

 

I am happy to say, he is still going strong and he has a new sister for company. She came to us as an 8 yrs old rescue cat and we have had her for 2 yrs.

 

Our cats are both allowed outside during the day but kept in at night.

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Flights booked for Sydney 29/09/2015 :cool:

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