Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

jobolt

Taking cats

Recommended Posts

19 hours ago, jobolt said:

We've decided that we are taking two of our cats, the older ones won't cope and it would be selfish of us to put them through it, but the younger two have had their rabies vaccine yesterday so I've started the ball rolling...

We're in a difficult situation that my husband will potentially need to start his job mid January and therefore the two we are taking will have to go into a foster home until beg. of May until they are allowed to fly:( At least by that time we will have found a suitable rental and can provide a cat friendly area for them.

How old are the older ones?  Our cat was about 14 (from memory), we took her to the vet for advice - he did a 'geriatric work up' .. cost us about 100 pounds at the time but said that there was no reason she couldn't do the journey.  Her travel crate was really quite roomy, she had food and water during the flight and was looked after really well in Quarantine (it was 30 days then). 


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 10:11, Skani said:

What type of area will you be moving to?    It is possible to cat proof a fence so that they can't leave  your property, but that might be difficult if you are renting.  I have a "cat proofed" area in my back yard for my 3 cats which is the best of both worlds:  they can go outdoors but can't wander off the property and I know where they are at all times.    Re heat:  I certainly don't have problems with that as I live in Tasmania.  In warmer areas you will most probably have air conditioning and they will find a cool spot in the house if they are feeling uncomfortable.

Agree Skani,

We're in WA which is warm - our cat tended to find shade and liked lying on the tile floors - we always made sure there was water in doors and out doors. 


I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Why?

 

Well most normal people love their pets as family members.

To tell someone to rehome their pet when they are already anxious or indecisive about bringing them - is pretty insensitive advice.

You don't tend to just rehome them unless you can help it (i.e.) the cat is very old and won't cope with the trip

Some councils like North Sydney council are stricter than others. Our local council just requires desexing, microchipping and registration. Which is sensible for anyone who cares for a cat anyway.  

Personally from what I have seen, humans do more damage to wildlife that cats do. For example : chopping down trees and areas wildlife live in, to build roads and houses.  Or polluting the waterways.

I have taken five cats through rentals and let them out during the day wearing bells, you can hear them coming from a mile off, and they cannot get close to wildlife. They have all lived to grand old ages. Even in a rental, you can easily put up a cat run in the garden to stop them wandering.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, ali said:

How old are the older ones?  Our cat was about 14 (from memory), we took her to the vet for advice - he did a 'geriatric work up' .. cost us about 100 pounds at the time but said that there was no reason she couldn't do the journey.  Her travel crate was really quite roomy, she had food and water during the flight and was looked after really well in Quarantine (it was 30 days then). 

The older ones are 11 and 14, but both don't cope well with being kept indoors.  They're not the most chilled of cats and the older one is a very territorial male that would potentially cause issues in the neighbourhood.  It's nowhere near an easy decision, it has broken my heart, but is for the better of them and they have a wonderful new home to go to of someone they already know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Tootsie said:

 

Well most normal people love their pets as family members.

To tell someone to rehome their pet when they are already anxious or indecisive about bringing them - is pretty insensitive advice.

I love animals too.  But most people who love animals love ALL animals, not just their cat. 

If someone brings an outdoor cat to Australia and allows it to roam outdoors here, it is going to kill wildlife.  If they rehome the cat, of course it will be a difficult and painful thing to do, but they will get over it.  If they bring the cat here, the birds and little mammals will be dead - they can never get over it. 

It would be pretty selfish and heartless of anyone to say the happiness of their cat is more important than the lives of other animals.

If they feel their cat could adapt to a more confined life, then they should bring it. I said that.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We brought 2 cats to Perth from snow to 30 degrees within 2 days. They didn't enjoy the quarantine but luckily because of a bush fire they were released to home quarantine after 2 weeks.

At first we built a cat run and they went out doors - but we soon discovered that they just moved to a shady bush and seldom moved.

We then bought a large holiday apartment and found to our surprise that when we returned to the house, the cats still preferred inside living and would come in all the time. The apartment has 2 large balconies and they love sitting out there in the summer, looking out over the water.

There is no way we could have left them behind. They are registered, chipped as before. There is a curfew here at 10pm for cats but as I said ours have become indoor cats and there is no sign of them wanting to escape etc.

But there are great cat runs and a new roller bar system on top of the fence which a friend has installed which keeps cats in the run, and others out.

Yes there are people who think cats are terrible predators but they never talk about killing snakes, crows and other wild creatures that devour wild life. 

 

 

Edited by fosseboy
mistake
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fosseboy said:

We brought 2 cats to Perth from snow to 30 degrees within 2 days. They didn't enjoy the quarantine but luckily because of a bush fire they were released to home quarantine after 2 weeks.

At first we built a cat run and they went out doors - but we soon discovered that they just moved to a shady bush and seldom moved.

We then bought a large holiday apartment and found to our surprise that when we returned to the house, the cats still preferred inside living and would come in all the time. The apartment has 2 large balconies and they love sitting out there in the summer, looking out over the water.

There is no way we could have left them behind. They are registered, chipped as before. There is a curfew here at 10pm for cats but as I said ours have become indoor cats and there is no sign of them wanting to escape etc.

But there are great cat runs and a new roller bar system on top of the fence which a friend has installed which keeps cats in the run, and others out.

Yes there are people who think cats are terrible predators but they never talk about killing snakes, crows and other wild creatures that devour wild life. 

 

 

I’ve seen these roller bars. Do they work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes roller bars work at a our friends house. Cheaper than some enclosures and you still have your outdoor area free of mesh.

There is a WA installer and a website and he had Oscillot rollers installed.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, fosseboy said:

Yes there are people who think cats are terrible predators but they never talk about killing snakes, crows and other wild creatures that devour wild life. 

No, because snakes and birds kill only when they are hungry.    Cats are intelligent, curious creatures who will stalk and catch things for play, not necessarily to kill - and if they play with a small animal, they will injure it even though they have no intention of killing.   A cat out exploring could kill a whole clutch of ground-nesting baby birds and not eat one of them.  A snake or a bird would not.

Foxes would, but then we regard foxes as more of a problem than cats - they are also a non-native predator. 

Australian mainland wildlife evolved without foxes or cats and there was no equivalent predator, that's why they are more vulnerable than British wildlife.

Edited by Marisawright

Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×