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The Pom Queen

Moving Back to the UK from Australia - Positive Stories

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Ok I have been asked to start a thread by a couple of members now. This thread is for members who have returned back to the UK (or any other country) and are happy with their decision, it's the stories of their ups and downs and successes and how returning to the UK has improved their lifestyle etc.

 

Warning - Any negative comments on this thread will be deleted, if we miss one just hit the report button. Off topic posts will not be tolerated. If you are happy in Australia please post and share your experience here 

 

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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We returned to the UK in March 2016 - can't believe we have been back now over 2 years! We had spent eight years in Australia, starting in Sydney then Mandurh WA. 

We were overall very happy in WA, but the downturn caused big issues with me finding work, then all of a sudden I was offered a job back in the UK and we decided to go for it. It was the maddest week of our lives as we went from making the decision on a Tuesday night to me flying the Saturday! My wife had to wait behind for a week with the dog until he was able to fly which she spent is a pretty much empty house as we spent the week before I flew selling everything and shipped a small movecube of personal things. The keys to the house were left with the estate agent which eventually sold a few months later, but at a big loss

Getting back was very "odd" as we had nothing. We arrived at Heathrow with a suitcase each and most of that was stuff for the dog such as his bed. 

We now live in a small cottage in a tiny village in central Scotland which we adore. We are surrounded by stunning countywide including an incident woodland with a stunning waterfall. 

We have our ups and downs the same as everyone, but we are very glad to be back. We were discussing it the other day and my wife put it like this. She was happy in Oz, but didn't feel "complete". Like there was something missing, but now she doesn't feel that anymore. 

There are things and people we miss. I know my wife misses walking the dog on the beach, but, she loves the countryside and open fields - the right to roam is fantastic. 

So, overall we are very happy with the move. 

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We moved back by accident over 6.5 years ago now and, for me, personally it was the best move ever!  I’m an only child and every year I saw my parents getting older and frailer and each visit it got harder and harder to leave them but with a husband who was adamant he never wanted to live in U.K. again - ever (he’s an Aussie) I felt more and more trapped in a place I increasingly saw as alien and I didn’t belong. I’d been there 32years (8months & 3 days) when we left and for the most part been happy enough but never “quite” belonged.

It took a significant event like our son’s wedding to actually get my DH to U.K. for a visit (he would commit only to 4 weeks compared with the 8 weeks the rest of the family were keen to spend there). 2 days after we arrived, the wheels fell off and mum got carted off to hospital for 3 weeks. Then 10 days after mum got out of hospital dad had a heart attack. My DH had basically taken one look at them and said “we can’t leave them” but he headed back to Aus to tidy things up for us to return after that Christmas. Didn’t happen. A week after his heart attack dad had a stroke so I stayed and the DH came back a few weeks after he’d left. 

We arrived with a backpack each and have been squatting in their back bedroom ever since. The best change for me was feeling I belonged once more. I have friends I can laugh with and though they are all newly made friends (I hadn’t lived at home for well over 40 years at that point) they’re good friends. I lost around 50kg, I walk everywhere, I go to the gym, we were able to take the odd weekend away together to begin with, we got on really well together exploring Britain like we had not done since we last lived there. Gradually mum got more and more disabled and demented but we kept her in her home for 4 years and eventually she had to go into care for 18 months until she died last year. Dad had a stroke last year and several other health scares so he needs 24/7 support. DH and I tag team so now never get away together except at this moment we are in the middle of a 5 week break back to Australia having got 5 weeks respite care for dad. 

I’ve  promised to return to Australia when dad dies but though I no longer vomit at the thought, I’m finding it still really alien here. I cannot feel I belong even though I like being in my own house. I have tried. I call it “home” consciously but not emotionally. I will have to work hard at not stacking back the weight, I have a few friends who’ve made the effort to catch up for coffee which has been nice.  We will always have grandkids on opposite sides of the world so we hope to still be able to travel but financially we are better off in Australia because of pensions, real estate etc. We should have moved back 20 years ago when we could better rebuild in U.K. before it was too late. 

DH is ok with living in U.K. because he’s not trapped there. Dad is 94 he’s not going to live forever. It’s tough going at the moment but DH and I are stronger together because we are in it together and DH has said many times that he’s thrilled to have his wife back - the one he married, not the one who lost her sense of self in Australia. Meanwhile I’m trying to enjoy being back in Australia- I love my shower and the wide car parking spaces but the coffee is too strong and few places have cream with it!

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We returned to the UK in September 2017, so a little over seven months ago, and it has absolutely been a success!

We were in Sydney for a little under nine years, having moved over with my OH's company.  We lived in Sutherland Shire, and in the main we were happy.  The kids were tiny when we moved over, so Australia was really all they knew.  They were in a great school, OH enjoyed his job, and I was pretty happy running my own small business from home.  However, in about 2014/2015 I started to feel a bit unsettled.  Not homesick or anything like that, and it wasn't that I missed family in particular, just that I started to feel intense loneliness, and like I didn't really fit in or belong somehow.  I can't really pinpoint any trigger in particular, and it is quite a hard feeling to describe, but I started to feel like I shouldn't be there.  However, everyone else was happy so I put on a smile and got on with it, probably at great cost to my own mental health.

In September/October 2016 we visited the UK for a holiday.  My mil had had a breast cancer scare, and hadn't been able to visit us the Christmas before, so we decided that we'd go over and see everyone.  It was our second visit in the time we were living in Australia.  While we were there, I realised just how unhappy I had been in Australia, and finally told my OH how I felt.  He astonished me by telling me that he was a bit 'meh' about Australia too.  Getting back on that plane to go back to Sydney was one of the hardest things I've ever done, and OH agreed that we could at least talk about returning to the UK once we were settled back after our holiday.  We spent three or four months talking about things as a couple and with the kids, and just after Christmas 2016 we finally made the decision to return.  The next few months flew by in a whirlwind of job hunting, research, renovation of our house, and decluttering and packing our belongings.  We had decided not to move back to where we had come from in the UK, and instead we chose and researched several areas of interest, including Bath/Bristol, York and Harrogate, Durham, Newcastle, and various bits of Scotland.  As luck would have it, OH was approached by a practice a bit north of Edinburgh, who created a role for him and left it open ended in terms of start date, so in early September 2017 we and our cats arrived at Edinburgh airport.

Seven months on and I am absolutely certain that we have done the right thing.  Reading VS's story above, I completely understand where his wife is coming from.  I feel 'complete' here, like I belong and like I should be here.  I know that OH and the kids feel the same.  I hadn't quite realised how unhappy eldest kid had been in Australia, but now we are settled here the difference in her is astonishing.  It is almost like there are sunbeams shining out of her face, she just radiates happiness!  She is absolutely blossoming, as is our youngest, they both just belong here.  I can't explain it any better than that!  We live in a gorgeous village, out in the hills on the southern edge of the Scottish Highlands, but within easy distance of both Edinburgh and Glasgow.  We recently bought and moved into our own home, which is on the middle of a farm.  There are six other houses here, and all the kids go off and roam and play and explore together, which our two love.  They often 'borrow' a dog from the neighbour and take it off for a walk, and two of our neighbours have smallholdings so there are lots of other animals around the place!  The village school is small, which seems to suit both of the kids very well.  It is a lovely school within walking distance of home, and the teachers have really gone above and beyond to help them settle in.  They have both made some good friends, and eldest has made some friends from other schools who she will be starting high school with in August.  She has Asperger's, so I was worried about how she would cope with the changes, but she has been magnificent!  OH is enjoying his job, and it will be a very good career move for him longer term. 

It has taken a while for the mental repercussions of me being so unhappy for so long to leave, but I am pleased to report that I am getting there.  I am not working just yet, I'm still unpacking from our two moves, I've got to completely design and landscape our garden (it is a building site at the moment), and I want to get eldest settled in at high school, in case she has any wobbles with her Asperger's.  After that though I will start to think about going back to work.  For now I am enjoying getting out and about, walking in the beautiful countryside, making new friends, and just taking some time to breathe after the madness of the past couple of years!

It takes a huge amount of courage to take the leap and move overseas in the first place, and in some ways it can take more to admit that it is time to go home.  I don't for a second regret either move though.  I love the UK, I love Australia, and I love where we are now.  Life is good!

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Lovely posts guys. I have read a little about your reasons for returning to the UK on other threads but it interesting, despite very different circumstances, that each of you mention a sense of belonging. What causes or creates that I wonder, and why does it affect some people and not others?  @Quollreturned ‘home’ albeit in challenging and difficult circumstances, while @VERYSTORMY and @LKC moved to different parts of the UK so in that sense embarked on a completely new start, which suggests it’s not just about familiarity.

Although we have never lived in Aus we did relocate to a different area of the UK and knew fairly quickly this was home. The culture, the language, accents, landscape, coastline and history made this a very different place to be and the country steals a piece of your heart if you’re willing to let it. Maybe that’s it. Maybe a sense of belonging is easier to achieve when a place fits you, rather than you having to adjust to fit it?  T x

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3 hours ago, tea4too said:

Lovely posts guys. I have read a little about your reasons for returning to the UK on other threads but it interesting, despite very different circumstances, that each of you mention a sense of belonging. What causes or creates that I wonder, and why does it affect some people and not others?  @Quollreturned ‘home’ albeit in challenging and difficult circumstances, while @VERYSTORMY and @LKC moved to different parts of the UK so in that sense embarked on a completely new start, which suggests it’s not just about familiarity.

Although we have never lived in Aus we did relocate to a different area of the UK and knew fairly quickly this was home. The culture, the language, accents, landscape, coastline and history made this a very different place to be and the country steals a piece of your heart if you’re willing to let it. Maybe that’s it. Maybe a sense of belonging is easier to achieve when a place fits you, rather than you having to adjust to fit it?  T x

 

Do you know, this is something that I've thought about recently because of our experience and also because I've been looking into my family tree/ancestry.  I've always considered myself to be northern, despite having been born in Birmingham.  Half of my family on both mum and dads side are from Leeds area, and more distantly Northumbria and Scotland.  There is something that is being researched at the moment called genetic memory, and they are starting to think that some memories can be passed down in the genes.   It seems funny that I feel more at home here than I did in Australia, Suffolk or Birmingham, even though I've not lived here before, but I wonder if there is something in this genetic memory thing, having ancestors from northern England and Scotland?  I can't really explain why I feel like I belong.  It is really difficult to explain.  It's kind of like I'd be happy to die here and be interred for all eternity in the ground under my feet or something.  Like my bones have come home to rest.  I feel like I've always been here, and my body has just caught up.  It's a very odd yet comforting feeling, and as I said I don't really know how to put it into words or why I feel like I do.

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I believe genetic memory is a perfectly valid 'thing' ...  how does a bird know how to build a nest for the very first time ??   The first time I went to Scotland, it rained every day but I felt very comfortable and cosy there, very much like I was at home.  My family grew up in the west country but it transpires there is a family line back to Scotland, so who knows !!   We have been back 3 years with its ups and downs but I feel very much that I am home again.  We had a short break in February for some winter sunshine and when we were flying back and I could look down and see all the trees and houses etc I felt something in my chest 'click' into place, like a piece of a puzzle being slotted in.

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I think there’s something in genetic memory too. There’s something quite ephemeral about that sense of “belonging” that often defies logic

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7 hours ago, tea4too said:

Maybe a sense of belonging is easier to achieve when a place fits you, rather than you having to adjust to fit it?  T x

 

I don't think I've ever heard it summed up so perfectly!

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7 hours ago, Quoll said:

I think there’s something in genetic memory too. There’s something quite ephemeral about that sense of “belonging” that often defies logic

No, I don't think it's genetic.   Otherwise, how do you explain me?  I never felt I belonged in Scotland growing up - even though I never set foot outside the UK until I was 19.  When I arrived in Sydney, I had the weirdest feeling that I'd come home.   

Fast forward 30-odd years and I tried to settle back in the UK again.  And once again, I felt like a square peg in a round hole.  I feel so much more comfortable in Melbourne. 

I have looked back into my family tree and apart from a mystery surrounding my grandmother's folks (who might possibly have been gypsies), I come from generations of Scots.  

I think tea4too  has it right.  

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Can't explain why I just knew that I felt at home in Australia. When we were due to retire from Brunei we weren't ready to return to England, even after 10 years away and our children there. We knew we wanted to live here, but no generic memory at all.

We go to England most years for up to 3 months, but I wouldn't be bothered to go much if it wasn't for our grandchildren. I know when I land back in Brisbane and start the drive to the Coast I am home. Like other posters can't explain it. Lucky that no one place suits us all as it could get very crowded!!

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O

On ‎23‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 08:39, The Pom Queen said:
 

Ok I have been asked to start a thread by a couple of members now. This thread is for members who have returned back to the UK (or any other country) and are happy with their decision, it's the stories of their ups and downs and successes and how returning to the UK has improved their lifestyle etc.

 

Warning - Any negative comments on this thread will be deleted, if we miss one just hit the report button. Off topic posts will not be tolerated. If you are happy in Australia please post and share your experience here 

 

 

On ‎23‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 08:39, The Pom Queen said:
 

Ok I have been asked to start a thread by a couple of members now. This thread is for members who have returned back to the UK (or any other country) and are happy with their decision, it's the stories of their ups and downs and successes and how returning to the UK has improved their lifestyle etc.

 

Warning - Any negative comments on this thread will be deleted, if we miss one just hit the report button. Off topic posts will not be tolerated. If you are happy in Australia please post and share your experience here 

 

I wouldn't call it positive , but honest .

as a family we ended up coming back on holiday in 94".

we had 4 parents alive .

mom and dad had 6 grandchildren ,and didn't see any of them ....all in oz

I suppose someone has to put their hand up ,and take responsibility for aging parents .

It never crossed my mine ,that it would be me/us ?......but it was .

we have had a real mixed bag

standing in the hospital ,on my own ,as the youngest , being told your dad is going to die , was a low point .

one sibling didn't return fir the funeral , their card is marked , my time is coming

on the up side , we have been everywhere we could afford ....the u.s multiple times , europe every year ( not Benidorm ) ,the kids have had a fantastic and educational childhoood .

most of the major sights in europe ,they have seen them ,and we are back this year .

but carrying the weight of a whole family is draining , especially for my wife ,who is an absolute soldier ., mom isn't getting any younger.

3 phone calls a day , doctors and hospital visits

I have no time for my siblings now .

I see them as being very shallow and selfish , but that's the way it is .

where will we be after mom passes , who knows.

but being back n the UK has been an eye opener , especially where family Is concerned.

I have a lovely lock and leave property now ....so me and the boss ,will definitely be doing more travelling .

when I finally take this bag of rocks off my back ?

 

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BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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Hi, Kiwiathome (previously known kiwiinoz, I think).  I have been away from this forum for a long time.  I knew one day I would reply back, as I had a 

comment posted at me, that I looked back at later, kiwiinoz used to post here unhappily.  I don't remember who posted it, but soo true.  This is a nice thread to return to as it is

positive stories returning to the UK or any country.  I am happily settled back in NZ for nearly 3 years.  It is home for me.  It is amazing when you return home, how peaceful

and confident you feel. I don't want to say too much, just wanted to express that home really does matter.  And you know when you are home.  Life has moved on for me amazingly, but I do not think that this post it about that.  When I left Australia after 8 years, came home, set my feet down with my family, I just had such a sense of peace, happiness and confidence.  So to the comment I remember, yes I at times did post unhappily, there was a lot going on that wasn't good.  However, now I am very happy.  Good luck to you all and home is where the heart is.  xx

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1 hour ago, kiwiathome said:

Hi, Kiwiathome (previously known kiwiinoz, I think).  I have been away from this forum for a long time.  I knew one day I would reply back, as I had a 

comment posted at me, that I looked back at later, kiwiinoz used to post here unhappily.  I don't remember who posted it, but soo true.  This is a nice thread to return to as it is

positive stories returning to the UK or any country.  I am happily settled back in NZ for nearly 3 years.  It is home for me.  It is amazing when you return home, how peaceful

and confident you feel. I don't want to say too much, just wanted to express that home really does matter.  And you know when you are home.  Life has moved on for me amazingly, but I do not think that this post it about that.  When I left Australia after 8 years, came home, set my feet down with my family, I just had such a sense of peace, happiness and confidence.  So to the comment I remember, yes I at times did post unhappily, there was a lot going on that wasn't good.  However, now I am very happy.  Good luck to you all and home is where the heart is.  xx

That's good to hear.  :)  I remember your posts.  You were hoping to get back to the UK at some point but glad it's all worked out for you in NZ.

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I have been back in the UK 3 years very soon, after about 9 in Australia. During my time there, I went from elation to loving the place and ranting about how great everything was to returning to UK when I had my baby, to returning to Australia and still liking it and raising a kid with little to no support, to then enter the years of being crushed by the isolation, homesickness and general 'this is not home' feelings. Like a lot of people, underestimated how as life changes, so do you- the backpacking me was no longer the mother me, the missing family, my own culture and seeing my parents age. Australia grated more and more, and i felt like a nothing person, i had lost all sense of self, normal for mums of young kids but coupled with cultural isolation, even worse. I was not into baking, netball, BBQs or beaches by this point-  I longed for nothing more than to show my child what i had grown up with- basically UK culture. It has been hard starting over and it's a struggle for some of us returning. As a single parent, the UK is a tough place. Rent is high, help with childcare much less than in Australia and yet I am way happier. Returning to old friendships- i had to put a lot of work into re-establishing bonds etc, and have made lots of new ones also. I found it very tough making proper friends in Australia- most of those when tested, fell apart. Here, we have a life full of people and activities. And family. I walk around disgruntled by many things in the UK but I actually laugh here, connect to people and fit in. You cannot put a price on that. They say mental health is better treated in Australia but i disagree. When i was going through a terrible time, that old attitude of 'toughen up and get on with it' was not helpful. I find my British friends are a lot more sympathetic and help out more, and I do so in return. Overall, yes a success. I still think of Australia kindly and would like to visit for a holiday and dream of a long stint during my older years travelling around NW WA. However, for now, it has been lovely finding the old me. My child also loves UK life and has no desires to return to Australia. Whether that changes who knows, but there really is no place like home....

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We returned to the U.K. in March 2017 after having spent 10 years in Perth. Our children were aged 11 and 13, and had just started years 7 and 9 in the February. And our dog was nearly 2!

Without a doubt it has been the best move for us. We had grown to feel so isolated and alone in Perth and no matter how hard we tried we couldn’t make a single proper friend. The move back was just a dream at first, a “maybe” but because we were getting to our 50’s and with younger children it didn’t seem achievable. Our decision was finally made when we came on holiday to the U.K. in July 2016 and spent almost a month touring round, staying in our own accommodation but meeting up with friends and family along the way. This is when we realised that this was what was missing, not just the family and friends but the place itself. It was HOME. The beautiful countryside the diversity of each place that you can visit and never get bored. The weather, yes the weather! Those long summer days we had on holiday were amazing and our children couldn’t believe how light it was at night.

Once we returned to Australia we got our house ready for selling and put it on the market. 

When we arrived in March last year we had booked holiday accommodation for 3 weeks, we ended up staying for 3 months and made two wonderful friends of the owners, whom we spend a lot of time with now. 

We had to remember when we arrived that we weren’t on holiday and whilst neither of us had a job every penny that we spent was coming out of our savings. 

It took nearly 3 months for my husband to find a suitable job, the construction industry has changed massively in the last ten years and there were a few courses he had to do first. I won’t lie and say it was all plain sailing because it was an extremely stressful time. Waiting every day for phone calls and emails was awful. Because we didn’t know where we were going to finally end up living we had to put our children in a temporary school for those first 3 months, they have coped admirally with the move and are both very happy. Our son, who had just started year 9 in Australia, went back a year at school as starting Year 9 here so close to the end of the year would have been unfair on him. So for the March to July last year he went into year 8 and then started Year 9 in September last year at his permanent School. 

Once my husbands job was sorted we looked for a rental property in a central location just in case things didn’t work out job wise and then he would be ideally located for other positions. We ended up renting a Grade II listed farmhouse in a lovely village. It is lovely and we have been in it almost a year. 

Our first cold Christmas was amazing, we all had a wonderful time with the added benefits of having many people over at different times during the festivities. 

SNOW! Wow we have had so much, the children didn’t remember snow at all and even though they are a bit older they still loved it. Schools were closed for 3 days which was a complete novelty for them! 

We are in the process of buying our own home now and are excited to feel totally settled. It is in the same village that we are in so no major moves there. 

We are so happy that we braved the move, it was stressful, scary and exciting. We didn’t do it for anyone but ourselves though, yes, of course having friends and family nearby is an amazing bonus. BUT you have to remember if you have been away a long time things will not be as they once were. We are lucky and see friends and family fairly often, but sometimes I want a bit “more” and have to remember that we no longer have that “right” just to slot into peoples lives who have had to move on from the hole we originally created when we left. But that’s ok, because even seeing people once or twice a month is a whole lot more than once every 4 or 5 years! And nothing beats the feeling of “belonging” again. 

Here’s to a lovely summer, we are certainly enjoying some superb weather at the minute and sitting watching our son play a village cricket game in the sunshine is lovely way to spend a Saturday afternoon! 

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20 hours ago, Martinbjulieb said:

We returned to the U.K. in March 2017 after having spent 10 years in Perth. Our children were aged 11 and 13, and had just started years 7 and 9 in the February. And our dog was nearly 2!

Without a doubt it has been the best move for us. We had grown to feel so isolated and alone in Perth and no matter how hard we tried we couldn’t make a single proper friend. The move back was just a dream at first, a “maybe” but because we were getting to our 50’s and with younger children it didn’t seem achievable. Our decision was finally made when we came on holiday to the U.K. in July 2016 and spent almost a month touring round, staying in our own accommodation but meeting up with friends and family along the way. This is when we realised that this was what was missing, not just the family and friends but the place itself. It was HOME. The beautiful countryside the diversity of each place that you can visit and never get bored. The weather, yes the weather! Those long summer days we had on holiday were amazing and our children couldn’t believe how light it was at night.

Once we returned to Australia we got our house ready for selling and put it on the market. 

When we arrived in March last year we had booked holiday accommodation for 3 weeks, we ended up staying for 3 months and made two wonderful friends of the owners, whom we spend a lot of time with now. 

We had to remember when we arrived that we weren’t on holiday and whilst neither of us had a job every penny that we spent was coming out of our savings. 

It took nearly 3 months for my husband to find a suitable job, the construction industry has changed massively in the last ten years and there were a few courses he had to do first. I won’t lie and say it was all plain sailing because it was an extremely stressful time. Waiting every day for phone calls and emails was awful. Because we didn’t know where we were going to finally end up living we had to put our children in a temporary school for those first 3 months, they have coped admirally with the move and are both very happy. Our son, who had just started year 9 in Australia, went back a year at school as starting Year 9 here so close to the end of the year would have been unfair on him. So for the March to July last year he went into year 8 and then started Year 9 in September last year at his permanent School. 

Once my husbands job was sorted we looked for a rental property in a central location just in case things didn’t work out job wise and then he would be ideally located for other positions. We ended up renting a Grade II listed farmhouse in a lovely village. It is lovely and we have been in it almost a year. 

Our first cold Christmas was amazing, we all had a wonderful time with the added benefits of having many people over at different times during the festivities. 

SNOW! Wow we have had so much, the children didn’t remember snow at all and even though they are a bit older they still loved it. Schools were closed for 3 days which was a complete novelty for them! 

We are in the process of buying our own home now and are excited to feel totally settled. It is in the same village that we are in so no major moves there. 

We are so happy that we braved the move, it was stressful, scary and exciting. We didn’t do it for anyone but ourselves though, yes, of course having friends and family nearby is an amazing bonus. BUT you have to remember if you have been away a long time things will not be as they once were. We are lucky and see friends and family fairly often, but sometimes I want a bit “more” and have to remember that we no longer have that “right” just to slot into peoples lives who have had to move on from the hole we originally created when we left. But that’s ok, because even seeing people once or twice a month is a whole lot more than once every 4 or 5 years! And nothing beats the feeling of “belonging” again. 

Here’s to a lovely summer, we are certainly enjoying some superb weather at the minute and sitting watching our son play a village cricket game in the sunshine is lovely way to spend a Saturday afternoon! 

great post martin ...i hear on the grapevine ,we are in for a good summer ...fingers crossed ....glad its worked out for you ( either way ) ....great to hear good news .

enjoy it ....make the most of being here.

  • Like 2

BUT I DONT FEEL AFRAID

AS LONG AS I GAZE AT

WATERLOO SUNSET

IAM IN PARADISE

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Moved back to deepest Cornwall in January just in time for the snow.

Our dogs followed in Feb, wife in March.

At present we're living in a campervan, while our house is being extensively rebuilt.

Great to be part of a community / village again, great catching up with friends.

Loving showing my Aussie wife her new home country.

We're taking the campervan on tour soon, heading off for a couple of weeks, then house sitting for mates in N Devon.

Retired life is the canine's genitals.

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all my eye and Betty Martin.

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Can I ask is there a post for those that moved from Aus to England and finding it hard to settle - not to rant about why but to explain why and find out ways of overcoming some issues?  I read no negative comments so I'm not wanting to rock the boat?

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1 hour ago, suesmalls said:

Can I ask is there a post for those that moved from Aus to England and finding it hard to settle - not to rant about why but to explain why and find out ways of overcoming some issues?  I read no negative comments so I'm not wanting to rock the boat?

Feel free to start a thread on it ? 

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On ‎23‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 14:37, LKC said:

We returned to the UK in September 2017, so a little over seven months ago, and it has absolutely been a success!
 

Happy to read your success story and all about how you acted on your gut feeling.   We lived in Perth, pleasant enough place but the isolation and quietness was too much for us in the end.   Life in UK is very good indeed.

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On 27/05/2018 at 17:14, Home and Happy said:

Happy to read your success story and all about how you acted on your gut feeling.   We lived in Perth, pleasant enough place but the isolation and quietness was too much for us in the end.   Life in UK is very good indeed.

Having never been over to that side of Australia , genuine question what made you choose Perth ? 

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1 hour ago, Rallyman said:

Having never been over to that side of Australia , genuine question what made you choose Perth ? 

When we lived in Perth over 30 years ago there were huge numbers of Poms living there - suburbs full of them.  Still don't know why they all chose Perth rather than the east coast.  We were in Sydney for a year before we moved to Perth.  OH had a job to go to and I went after him - on the Indian Pacific train.  It was the same price as flying in those days.  We were in Perth for approx 4 years then there was a real slump so we moved back to Sydney and never looked back.  I did really like Perth though.  I had my two babies there so I was kept very busy with one thing and another plus I made a couple of very good friends so I had no chance to get bored     ................................  beats me why so many people label Perth as boring but there you go.

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On 23/04/2018 at 17:09, The Pom Queen said:
Warning - Any negative comments on this thread will be deleted, if we miss one just hit the report button. Off topic posts will not be tolerated. 

 

Just a reminder. 

Thanks in advance.

 

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4 hours ago, Toots said:

When we lived in Perth over 30 years ago there were huge numbers of Poms living there - suburbs full of them.  Still don't know why they all chose Perth rather than the east coast.  We were in Sydney for a year before we moved to Perth.  OH had a job to go to and I went after him - on the Indian Pacific train.  It was the same price as flying in those days.  We were in Perth for approx 4 years then there was a real slump so we moved back to Sydney and never looked back.  I did really like Perth though.  I had my two babies there so I was kept very busy with one thing and another plus I made a couple of very good friends so I had no chance to get bored     ................................  beats me why so many people label Perth as boring but there you go.

Each to their own I suppose , but I think that you get out of it what you put in an old school friend lives over there he’s very happy 

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