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Tasha

Illustration or art teacher

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Hi everyone,

I live in Scotland and my son age 22 wants to move to Australia after studying his Open Uni degree (will finish 2020 I think) in Computing. He wants myself and my daughter (age 7) to all go. The idea has really grown on me, but I wonder about best options to have best chances of getting a visa. I am 41 years old so time is important here.

 I have a degree in Fine Art and work in an Arts Organisation as a gallery assistant. I am skilled in oil painting and drawing, but have been focusing on my young daughter recently so not done a lot of painting. I would say I have talent in that area though. I looked at the skill shortages and note that illustrators and secondary school teachers are needed. I could do illustration I feel, but think a Masters in Illustration might be a good option to hone these skills or I could do a year teacher training to become an art teacher. I don't know what would be easier to get in with. At the moment I seem to have 50 points on the independent visa skilled points system so not enough. I think I might have to be sponsored by a region maybe?

So I am just considering what my best course of action in these next couple of years. Does Illustration look the better option or teaching? How do they assess me to see if I can do illustration? Would having an art degree be acceptable or would they want me to prove my skills some other way?

 

Many thanks for any contribution :)

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Oh forgot to mention my sister and her husband might move in the next 18 months to Australia so there could be the potential for them sponsor me.

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

First things first - your son can certainly apply for a Working Holiday Visa when he's finished his course, which would give him a year (or possibly two) in Australia.  However, he shouldn't assume that he'll be able to get a visa to move permanently.

It sounds like you understand that the only way to migrate is to have an occupation that's on the official list.  Be aware that  on top of that, there are requirements for qualifications AND post-qualification experience for most occupations, so your son may not be able to apply straight after qualifying.   

The other bad news is that even if you're both on the list now, the whole visa system is undergoing a major review right now, so it's going to look very different by 2020.   

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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Another thing to be aware of, you say you and your younger child would like to go. You will need the permission of that child's father to take them.

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Fortunately that isn't an issue :). Her father has never been a part of her life.

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20 minutes ago, Tasha said:

Fortunately that isn't an issue :). Her father has never been a part of her life.

I may be wrong but I think you still need something giving permission even if absent. Someone may be along to correct or confirm that shortly 

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Posted (edited)

In answer to your question, despite the fact that you have a fine art degree you do not work as an illustrator - you work as an art gallery assistant. Therefore, you could not demonstrate that you have the skills or experience for any visa that is available to an illustrator.

As far as teaching, yes you could undertake a one year teaching qualification. However, remember it is a demanding profession and students here deserve educators who actually have a passion for teaching, not just an entry to Australia. Whilst it might get you a visa, there are very few art teaching positions available here as they are highly sought after and competition is fierce.
From the information that you have given, teaching is your best bet. Just remember visa opportunities change all of the time.

Edited by Sammy1
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22 minutes ago, Tasha said:

Fortunately that isn't an issue :). Her father has never been a part of her life.

Are they on the birth certificate?  Even if absent you may need to prove that you have tried to contact them to seek permission.

To teach - you will need a 4 year degree and some post qualification teaching experience to pass the skills assessment.

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I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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11 minutes ago, ali said:

Are they on the birth certificate?  Even if absent you may need to prove that you have tried to contact them to seek permission.

To teach - you will need a 4 year degree and some post qualification teaching experience to pass the skills assessment.

No he is not on birth certificate. He is not contactable either. I could do teaching 1 year course next year and then you are guaranteed a year teaching experience.

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9 minutes ago, Tasha said:

No he is not on birth certificate. He is not contactable either. I could do teaching 1 year course next year and then you are guaranteed a year teaching experience.

Hi @Tasha even if not on the birth certificate you will need a court order to remove your child from the jurisdiction. It should be an easy application if the father isn’t around to object. You may need to show proof that you have tried to find him. 

‘Good luck with everything it sounds very exciting but like others have said it is a hard process and be prepared for an emotional roller coaster.

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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Posted (edited)

Remember, the course must be through a university, have a minimum of 45 days of supervised teaching and must NOT be on the job training in a school. Those courses (based in schools) are ineligible for entry or registration purposes here. Others have been caught out by that, so carefully choose a course that is applicable for here.

Edited by Sammy1
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I will try and pull this all together for you. 

First your son. He isn't migrating on finishing uni. He would be entitled to a working holiday visa which is a one year visa with work rights. But it is what it says on the tin. A holiday and he will be coming home at the end. He does not qualify for a permanent visa as he would need several years post qualification experience  

With regards yourself, at the moment, you do not qualify for a visa, which I believe you know. Your idea of retraining may be an option, but would require a major investment and a pretty "iffy" chance of qualifying as you would struggle on points, as you would have no points for experience and by the rime you did would be over the age limit. The cut off is 45. 

Then with your child, it doesn't matter who is or isn't on the birth certificate, unless you gain permission from the father, you will need a court order. So expect some significant time (which is against you) and expense. 

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5 minutes ago, VERYSTORMY said:

I will try and pull this all together for you. 

First your son. He isn't migrating on finishing uni. He would be entitled to a working holiday visa which is a one year visa with work rights. But it is what it says on the tin. A holiday and he will be coming home at the end. He does not qualify for a permanent visa as he would need several years post qualification experience  

With regards yourself, at the moment, you do not qualify for a visa, which I believe you know. Your idea of retraining may be an option, but would require a major investment and a pretty "iffy" chance of qualifying as you would struggle on points, as you would have no points for experience and by the rime you did would be over the age limit. The cut off is 45. 

Then with your child, it doesn't matter who is or isn't on the birth certificate, unless you gain permission from the father, you will need a court order. So expect some significant time (which is against you) and expense. 

She is 41, the teaching course is one year, with experience she would just scrape in age wise.

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Just now, Sammy1 said:

She is 41, the teaching course is one year, with experience she would just scrape in age wise.

 

Just now, Sammy1 said:

She is 41, the teaching course is one year, with experience she would just scrape in age wise.

Just. Hence, why I pointed out, just. If she reacts now. 

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1 minute ago, VERYSTORMY said:

 

Just. Hence, why I pointed out, just. If she reacts now. 

Thanks for clarifying, in your comment you said she would be over the age limit.

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4 hours ago, Marisawright said:

First things first - your son can certainly apply for a Working Holiday Visa when he's finished his course, which would give him a year (or possibly two) in Australia.  However, he shouldn't assume that he'll be able to get a visa to move permanently.

It sounds like you understand that the only way to migrate is to have an occupation that's on the official list.  Be aware that  on top of that, there are requirements for qualifications AND post-qualification experience for most occupations, so your son may not be able to apply straight after qualifying.   

The other bad news is that even if you're both on the list now, the whole visa system is undergoing a major review right now, so it's going to look very different by 2020.   

Which occupations need experience then? My son would have 65 points I think when he graduates. Would that not be enough for an independent skilled visa? 

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30 minutes ago, Sammy1 said:

Thanks for clarifying, in your comment you said she would be over the age limit.

yeah there isn't much room for error. Everything would have to align. I think it's almost doable!

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2 hours ago, Tasha said:

 

Which occupations need experience then? My son would have 65 points I think when he graduates. Would that not be enough for an independent skilled visa? 

99% of occupations need experience and I am not aware of any IT ones that don't. It isn't just a issue of points. He needs to pass a skills assessment for an occupation on the skills list. Many IT occupations are being removed. He will need to enter an occupation and then gain the relevant experience required for that occupations skills assessment. The average is 2-3 years post qual expsrience (Oz has plenty of its own grads). The risk as well is that many occupations are removed every year, so he could get it, but still not be eligible. 

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7 hours ago, Tasha said:

No he is not on birth certificate. He is not contactable either. I could do teaching 1 year course next year and then you are guaranteed a year teaching experience.

Hi, if her father is not on the birth certificate then you don’t need permission, unless something has changed recently.  UK law gives parental responsibility to the mother. I removed my son with no issues 12 years ago in this way. Another user is going through this process now and it doesn’t sound as though it has changed. I’ll try and find the thread for you.

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Ok. @MrsShields12 is the user I was thinking of. I have tagged her in so hopefully she will see this. She mentions May 2006 as a significant date and is in Scotland, so not sure if it’s something that is different in England, but it wasn’t. 

The thread is titled Step child and rights and is in the kids down under forum on here. Sorry I can’t post a link my iPad doesn’t like it!

Failing that search the law for where you live and double check. The Australian law is clear and heavily enforced in this area but it respects other countries laws so as long as there has been no change since I moved you will be fine, but please get it confirmed.

Good luck.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Tasha said:

 

Which occupations need experience then? My son would have 65 points I think when he graduates. Would that not be enough for an independent skilled visa? 

Virtually all of them need experience.   65 points is enough to apply - however currently, there are so many applicants with 70 points, that people with fewer points aren't even being considered. That's across the board in all occupations.

The thing with your son is, it may take him a few years longer than he thinks, but he's young enough to work towards migration and there's a good chance he will get there in the end. 

That presents a problem for you, because you cannot afford to wait and see if he gets in.  You'll be too old by then and there will be no way you can join your son in Australia.   There are parent visas but they cost a fortune and the price is going up all the time - plus that wouildn't allow your daughter to migrate and you could hardly leave her behind!

So essentially, you need to make a decision.  Do you accept that if your son goes to Australia, you can't go with him?   Or do you consult an agent right now, confirm that you do have time to complete the course and experience, and get cracking on a path to migration which you may not need?   Tough decision, good luck with it.    

Edited by Marisawright
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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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5 hours ago, Marisawright said:

Virtually all of them need experience.   65 points is enough to apply - however currently, there are so many applicants with 70 points, that people with fewer points aren't even being considered. That's across the board in all occupations.

The thing with your son is, it may take him a few years longer than he thinks, but he's young enough to work towards migration and there's a good chance he will get there in the end. 

That presents a problem for you, because you cannot afford to wait and see if he gets in.  You'll be too old by then and there will be no way you can join your son in Australia.   There are parent visas but they cost a fortune and the price is going up all the time - plus that wouildn't allow your daughter to migrate and you could hardly leave her behind!

So essentially, you need to make a decision.  Do you accept that if your son goes to Australia, you can't go with him?   Or do you consult an agent right now, confirm that you do have time to complete the course and experience, and get cracking on a path to migration which you may not need?   Tough decision, good luck with it.    

If she did a parent visa in the future her daughter could go on that as her dependant 

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8 hours ago, Tulip1 said:

If she did a parent visa in the future her daughter could go on that as her dependant 

As long as she is still dependent at that time.....

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19 hours ago, Amber Snowball said:

Ok. @MrsShields12 is the user I was thinking of. I have tagged her in so hopefully she will see this. She mentions May 2006 as a significant date and is in Scotland, so not sure if it’s something that is different in England, but it wasn’t. 

The thread is titled Step child and rights and is in the kids down under forum on here. Sorry I can’t post a link my iPad doesn’t like it!

Failing that search the law for where you live and double check. The Australian law is clear and heavily enforced in this area but it respects other countries laws so as long as there has been no change since I moved you will be fine, but please get it confirmed.

Good luck.

Thanks amber sorry I haven’t been on I’ll have a look above and see if I can help out 

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As far as I’m aware of the childs father is not on the birth certificate , In Scotland he has no PR ! I’ll double check this but I’m pretty certain . 

 

The parental right act wont apply to this user as her daughter was born after 2006 but I think she is ok 

I’m not a professional so please double check 

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