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Paul Washbourn

School changeover

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Hi all, need advice if possible. We had decided to move to Australia next summer after my daughter had taken her gcse exams. 

We have had our visas come through and we must enter the country no later than January! Does anybody know if the grades she would receive in Australia are recognised in the UK if we come back? 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks

paul

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That is your first entry to validate visa date isn’t it? You don’t have to make the move by then, just enter Australia to validate the visas. 

As to the Aus results being recognised, I am not aware they are. There is the IB to consider perhaps.

Tbh I’d validate your visas before Jan and then make the move as you had planned after the summer. Let your daughter sit her GCSE’s. 

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3 hours ago, Paul Washbourn said:

Hi all, need advice if possible. We had decided to move to Australia next summer after my daughter had taken her gcse exams. 

We have had our visas come through and we must enter the country no later than January! Does anybody know if the grades she would receive in Australia are recognised in the UK if we come back? 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks

paul

As I understand it she wouldn't get grades in oz at GCSE age, like she would in the UK. Its a very different system. 

Have a holiday to oz to validate and then make the move after the GCSEs

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Hi, thanks for that. It is my wife who has sponsored me and our two children. When we enter to activate the visa does she have to be with us? Can’t really afford a holiday before we move so worse case me and the kids could fly there and back! 

Thanks

paul

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4 hours ago, Paul Washbourn said:

Hi, thanks for that. It is my wife who has sponsored me and our two children. When we enter to activate the visa does she have to be with us? Can’t really afford a holiday before we move so worse case me and the kids could fly there and back! 

Thanks

paul

If you mean she is an Australian spouse who has sponsored you on a partner visa, then no, she does not have to make the trip as she has no visa that needs validating

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10 hours ago, Paul Washbourn said:

Hi all, need advice if possible. We had decided to move to Australia next summer after my daughter had taken her gcse exams. 

We have had our visas come through and we must enter the country no later than January! Does anybody know if the grades she would receive in Australia are recognised in the UK if we come back? 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks

paul

Aussie Year 12 results don’t transfer back yo U.K. as well as A levels do in the reverse direction. In order for entry into an ordinary, lowish level U.K. Uni you need comparatively very high yr 12 scores or be required to do a Foundation year at Uni and remember that the kid would be classed as an international student with much higher fees than a local student.  As long as you validate before the date given your daughter could do that and hop straight on the plane to come back and get A levels which would be a bonus for her going to an Aus university or she could go to a U.K. university without penalty.  If there’s a chance that she might want to do Uni in U.K. after her final 2 years in Australia then do the IB at the same time as yr 12, some schools have the capacity for both. IB is more internationally recognised.

Remember, too, that kids in Aus start yr 11at age 16 or about to turn 16 and if she wants half decent scores at yr 12 she really needs to be there at the start of the year that she is just 16 (or about to be 16 within a month or two) in January when term starts. Don’t try and put her into yr 11 part way through as you don’t know how generous (or not) any potential GCSE crediting might be, and it’s better to keep on track with the course as set and assessed.

A quick flight over to validate is going to be the least of your financial problems I’d have thought.

Edited by Quoll

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International students are a massive cash cow in the UK; each university has a department specifically there to deal with them, and the British Council (from memory) publishes a tome which lists the equivalent UK qualification for every country.  I recall the volume that was on my desk actually went into detail as per the rigour of many overseas universities - there was always issues with diploma mills so we had information as to whether the institutions were actually legitimate or not.

Based on that, there's no real problem presented by having Australian year 12 qualifications; the issue would be as presented above - your daughter would be assessed as an overseas student and charged accordingly.  I was never aware of anyone being turned away for not having an IB or anything - all we did was go to the book, check they had the equivalent for admission and let them in. 

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Hi, thanks for your response. Can I just check we are on the same page here. Our plan is to allow my daughter to do her GCSE’s here then move. I believe she will have to go to school in oz until she is 18. The high fees you talk about, is this for university places in oz?? 

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59 minutes ago, Paul Washbourn said:

Hi, thanks for your response. Can I just check we are on the same page here. Our plan is to allow my daughter to do her GCSE’s here then move. I believe she will have to go to school in oz until she is 18. The high fees you talk about, is this for university places in oz?? 

Both Australia and the UK charge very high fees for international students. Both countries have residential requirements.  Whether you're a citizen is irrelevant, it's your residency status that matters.

Say you move to Oz, your daughter completes her education in Australia and then decides she wants to do her university degree in the UK.  Because she's no longer a legal resident of the UK, she will be classed as an international student and have to pay international fees.

The same would apply in reverse, but there may be an exemption for new migrants.

 


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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10 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

Both Australia and the UK charge very high fees for international students. Both countries have residential requirements.  Whether you're a citizen is irrelevant, it's your residency status that matters.

Say you move to Oz, your daughter completes her education in Australia and then decides she wants to do her university degree in the UK.  Because she's no longer a legal resident of the UK, she will be classed as an international student and have to pay international fees.

The same would apply in reverse, but there may be an exemption for new migrants.

 

In Australia, being a citizen is not irrelevant in relation to Uni fees. Australian citizens qualify for local fees. Australia doesn't care if you've been living overseas for the last three years prior to enrolling or not - you still qualify for local fees. This is totally unlike the UK who charge international fees for nationals who haven't lived in the UK for three years.

Similarly, in Australia, PR visa holders also qualify for local Uni fees (though they must be paid up-front). There is no requirement for them to have lived here for three years before enrolling. 

So it's not true when you say the same would apply in reverse.

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Hi, thanks for your response. Can I just check we are on the same page here. Our plan is to allow my daughter to do her GCSE’s here then move. I believe she will have to go to school in oz until she is 18. The high fees you talk about, is this for university places in oz?? 

If you have no plans to return to UK then GCSEs are irrelevant. International student fees in UK apply for anyone who has been out of the country for the 3 years preceding the Uni application. If you really want to keep all her options open, then wait until she’s done A levels whereby she could go to Uni in UK without penalty or Aus with a potentially better score than she might have got from her year 12 results

 

As your wife is an Aussie citizen sponsoring you, are your kids not citizens by descent?

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3 hours ago, NickyNook said:

In Australia, being a citizen is not irrelevant in relation to Uni fees. Australian citizens qualify for local fees. Australia doesn't care if you've been living overseas for the last three years prior to enrolling or not - you still qualify for local fees. This is totally unlike the UK who charge international fees for nationals who haven't lived in the UK for three years.

Similarly, in Australia, PR visa holders also qualify for local Uni fees (though they must be paid up-front). There is no requirement for them to have lived here for three years before enrolling. 

So it's not true when you say the same would apply in reverse.

Well there you are, I learned something.  I always thought Australian rules were very similar but I did say that I thought new migrants were exempt.  I stand corrected.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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