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simmo

Agile Working. / Technology

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I love it!  I recently had my mileage claim rejected because of a silly typos. I get the email, log in to my work terminal via Citrix and correct it for resubmission,... On my phone.., in the pub!!

I do site inspections and can compile site audit reports using  voice dictation on my phone, send it off (delayed delivery) and my reports are better than most surveyors on the firm.

I only go to the office if I have meetings or cpds .  It's great.

Anyone else reaping the benefits of technology like this.

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This forum is a perfect example.

The administrators can be anywhere in the world and as long as they have an internet connection they can take control.

Any more., You at the back?

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Agile and lean techniques have been around for quite a while now, at least since 2008 and is wager much earlier than that.

Most supplies I work with have used it for yonks - it’s becoming an overused word now, sometimes misappropriated in wrong contexts ( but not necessarily In this thread.

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Leans been around for years other systems of best practice includes kanban for instance ?

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Yes Kaizan and Kanban.

I think Toyota may have kicked it all off and they were seen as the best manufacturers probably in the 0ably in the 90s and 2000's.

Like many things though these may get replaced with a new flavour of the month.

Agile Project Management, Scrums and Sprints are all the rage for IT projects I'm involved in too.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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Not on about collaborative project management systems, I'm taking about on the go reporting

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15 hours ago, simmo said:

This forum is a perfect example.

The administrators can be anywhere in the world and as long as they have an internet connection they can take control.

Any more., You at the back?

As long as members remember that we have a life outside the forum, one particular poster threw a tantrum today because we can’t be on the forum approving their posts for the 20 hours a day they seem to spend on here.

It is good like you say as I can work from hospital as I wouldn’t get a job anywhere else I can work from my computer (iPad in my case)

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If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present.

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Yes Kaizan and Kanban.

I think Toyota may have kicked it all off and they were seen as the best manufacturers probably in the 0ably in the 90s and 2000's.

Like many things though these may get replaced with a new flavour of the month.

Agile Project Management, Scrums and Sprints are all the rage for IT projects I'm involved in too.

 

 

Yes, Agile PM has been around for a while, but seems to have kicked of big time in Aus. There seem to be a waterfall vs agile crowd, but where I’ve seen it done in the UK, it’s a tool in a tool box, pulled out as needed, not all the time. ie:agile and waterfall complementing each other, not opposed to each other.

 

Still people tend to appropriate agile as a method of cutting corners, I find, ‘agile procurement’ etc, ‘agile documents’ when what they mean is not agile in the sense of the PM methodology, but in the sense of making things quicker or less process driven (cut out the checks and balances, as opposed to have fewer of them)

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Yes Kaizan and Kanban.
I think Toyota may have kicked it all off and they were seen as the best manufacturers probably in the 0ably in the 90s and 2000's.
Like many things though these may get replaced with a new flavour of the month.
Agile Project Management, Scrums and Sprints are all the rage for IT projects I'm involved in too.



Yep, they did. Then we had lean thinking which was taken to an extreme in some offices . But it finally got cut back to hot desking and clean desk policies, and limited use of virtual kanbans to manage work flows (where I’ve seen it). At that level, it was brilliant. Love a clean hot desk!
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15 hours ago, ssiri said:

Agile and lean techniques have been around for quite a while now, at least since 2008 and is wager much earlier than that.

Most supplies I work with have used it for yonks - it’s becoming an overused word now, sometimes misappropriated in wrong contexts ( but not necessarily In this thread.

Since way before 2008. I was using Citrix to remote in to a customers environment back in 2000.  Not sure how accessible that kind of software was from home at the time though and certainly not while mobile.  Dial up internet was still the main internet connectivity at that time and that was slow.

Being able to connect all the time is a bit of a double edged sword.  Great for flexibility to work whenever and wherever but unless you are really disciplined it can start to eat in to your non work time and take over your life a bit.

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Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain but it takes character and self control to be understanding and forgiving.

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On 18/03/2018 at 14:40, simmo said:

I love it!  I recently had my mileage claim rejected because of a silly typos. I get the email, log in to my work terminal via Citrix and correct it for resubmission,... On my phone.., in the pub!!

I do site inspections and can compile site audit reports using  voice dictation on my phone, send it off (delayed delivery) and my reports are better than most surveyors on the firm.

I only go to the office if I have meetings or cpds .  It's great.

Anyone else reaping the benefits of technology like this.

Haven't seen agile used in that context before. It's generally used as a development methodology. But I get what you mean. You would probably use the word digital to describe what you mean. Although strictly speaking I've never considered that a correct term.

But yes, being able to work remotely is brilliant. I can work anywhere with a laptop. I could use a phone, but it's limited for what I do. It's one of the things the UK is leading the world.

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3 hours ago, NicF said:

Being able to connect all the time is a bit of a double edged sword.  Great for flexibility to work whenever and wherever but unless you are really disciplined it can start to eat in to your non work time and take over your life a bit.

I agree.  I hate the whole working-from-home thing.  I can see how it works for people who are stuck at home anyway, for whatever reason, but I found that (a) it was hard to separate work and home time, so I suspect I was doing hours I wasn't paid for, and (b) I was lonely.


Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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I worked from home, here in Sydney, full-time for 11 years from 1997 and then on the odd occasion for another five years. I supported a large mainframe IT system remotely via a dial-up link originally and then used Citrix in later years.

Loved every minute of it. People used to ask me if I was ever tempted to do the ironing instead of working. As if!

I loved having no-one looking over my shoulder all day, being able to sort out my own hours, work in my nightie if I wanted to and not have to be part of any office politics.

When I finally did return to working in a huge open-plan office, I was amazed how noisy it was and how little work people actually did as they were permanently being distracted by other people moving about, other people's phones ringing, having to break off whatever they were doing to attend another meeting.

I was far more productive at home and enjoyed it more. 

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I agree.  I hate the whole working-from-home thing.  I can see how it works for people who are stuck at home anyway, for whatever reason, but I found that (a) it was hard to separate work and home time, so I suspect I was doing hours I wasn't paid for, and (b) I was lonely.



It works well if there is also time spent at the office (to address the being lonely but). That way networks and relationships are also kept up. However Skype etc, also ensures virtual meetings can take place, no bother.

I don’t mind the non work/work separation. Apart from the odd trip out to the grocer /time for lunch/collect a home delivery it pretty much feels like a 9-5 for me.
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4 hours ago, newjez said:

Haven't seen agile used in that context before. It's generally used as a development methodology. But I get what you mean. You would probably use the word digital to describe what you mean. Although strictly speaking I've never considered that a correct term.

But yes, being able to work remotely is brilliant. I can work anywhere with a laptop. I could use a phone, but it's limited for what I do. It's one of the things the UK is leading the world.

It's plain English context. I have done the APMP and see why you think agile is a project management term but I also did a C&G diploma in Digital electronics and the word "digital" is far too broad.

Quote
agile
ˈadʒʌɪl/
adjective
 
  1. 1.
    able to move quickly and easily.
    "Ruth was as agile as a monkey"
    synonyms: nimble, lithe, spry, supple, limber, sprightly, acrobatic, dexterous, deft, willowy, graceful, light-footed, nimble-footed, light on one's feet, fleet-footed; 
    active, fit, in good condition; 
    lively, vigorous, quick-moving; 
    informalnippy, twinkle-toed; 
    literaryfleet, lightsome
    "the little girl was as agile as a monkey"
    alert, sharp, acute, clever, shrewd, astute, intelligent, quick-witted, perceptive,penetrating, piercing, active, nimble, quick off the mark, finely honed, rapier-like;
    informalsmart, on the ball
    "his agile mind was forever seeking new ways of conserving energy"

 I will explain more:  During site conformance and QA inspections I can leave the site office pretty much empty handed but for a tablet that fits in my pocket (no note pads, clip boards, checklists ect..).  I then proceed to carry out my inspections/audits.  I chose a project template then its a case of click to take a pic, then speech to text for my comments. I then email the report to the client or project manager.  I can also using my laptop tunnel in using citrix to my work server to access stuff like submitting expenses.  I can also log onto various cloud based project document management systems and pull up drawing, make comments, issue variation orders and stuff.  I can do it anywhere.

I see many people that still take reams of paperwork into the office and spend all day typing, scanning, uploading, moaning......  not as agile as me see.

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7 hours ago, ssiri said:

 

 


Yep, they did. Then we had lean thinking which was taken to an extreme in some offices . But it finally got cut back to hot desking and clean desk policies, and limited use of virtual kanbans to manage work flows (where I’ve seen it). At that level, it was brilliant. Love a clean hot desk!

 

 

I must say it is quite satisfying getting in early and sitting in someone else's favourite desk.

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10 minutes ago, simmo said:

It's plain English context. I have done the APMP and see why you think agile is a project management term but I also did a C&G diploma in Digital electronics and the word "digital" is far too broad.

 I will explain more:  During site conformance and QA inspections I can leave the site office pretty much empty handed but for a tablet that fits in my pocket (no note pads, clip boards, checklists ect..).  I then proceed to carry out my inspections/audits.  I chose a project template then its a case of click to take a pic, then speech to text for my comments. I then email the report to the client or project manager.  I can also using my laptop tunnel in using citrix to my work server to access stuff like submitting expenses.  I can also log onto various cloud based project document management systems and pull up drawing, make comments, issue variation orders and stuff.  I can do it anywhere.

I see many people that still take reams of paperwork into the office and spend all day typing, scanning, uploading, moaning......  not as agile as me see.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agile_software_development

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3 hours ago, ssiri said:

It works well if there is also time spent at the office (to address the being lonely but). That way networks and relationships are also kept up. However Skype etc, also ensures virtual meetings can take place, no bother.

I don’t mind the non work/work separation. Apart from the odd trip out to the grocer /time for lunch/collect a home delivery it pretty much feels like a 9-5 for me.

 

 

I couldn't work at home.  The Mrs would go mental..  but if i'm on site and need to do admin I will either borrow a desk in the project office or go home and do it

 

2 minutes ago, newjez said:

I wasn't referring to software (i'm sure the wiki article is very nice though)

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Most people hate hot desking.

They introduced it at my old work. Brought in rows of lockers and gave everyone a backpack and you were supposed just sit anywhere.

But most people want their own desk and leave stuff on it overnight.

I think the benefits of hot desking are vastly overstated and most people hate it too.

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I want it all, and I want it now.

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I work in IT and communications. Have done since early 80's. The last thing I want to be doing though is answering or having any interruptions from a phone when I'm in the pub. I go there to telax and have a laugh, not be dragged back into work mode.

I don't take my phone with me, even when I'm away on work trips. It's a work provided phone too and I've been threatened that they would take it off me. I just said OK, take it. I reckon I could live without one TBH.

As far as all this agile, standups, scrum, scrum of scrums stuff doesn't it make you wonder how we've been getting stuff done for the last few hundred years?

Guess we didn't have the constant interruptions from mobiles, meetings, emails and the tons of form filling and covering your butt via jira, subversion, wiki and all the other tools that atlassian provides. We could go into work knowing what was expected and needed to be done and work on it without interruptions. Sometimes for a whole day or two. Imagine that.?

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7 hours ago, NickyNook said:

I worked from home, here in Sydney, full-time for 11 years from 1997 and then on the odd occasion for another five years. I supported a large mainframe IT system remotely via a dial-up link originally and then used Citrix in later years.

Loved every minute of it. People used to ask me if I was ever tempted to do the ironing instead of working. As if!

I loved having no-one looking over my shoulder all day, being able to sort out my own hours, work in my nightie if I wanted to and not have to be part of any office politics.

When I finally did return to working in a huge open-plan office, I was amazed how noisy it was and how little work people actually did as they were permanently being distracted by other people moving about, other people's phones ringing, having to break off whatever they were doing to attend another meeting.

I was far more productive at home and enjoyed it more. 

Were you productive though or did you just have loads of spare time doing nothing? I can't see mainframe support being a full time job TBH. I've done the same sort of thing and I didn't much care for the working from home lark. I worked in Manchester for a company based in London. My missus got used to having me around and it got to the point of her saying can't you just paint this or do that when I wasn't that busy. Had the equipment down in the cellar luckily so used to disappear down there.

Much prefer working in an office where you can have a laugh and work with other people. I think office politics and bitchiness is worse where there are a lot of women. My wifes been in nursing all her life and she'd be the first to agree.

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45 minutes ago, Parley said:

Most people hate hot desking.

They introduced it at my old work. Brought in rows of lockers and gave everyone a backpack and you were supposed just sit anywhere.

But most people want their own desk and leave stuff on it overnight.

I think the benefits of hot desking are vastly overstated and most people hate it too.

You are absolutely right.  I was a facilities manager when the whole hot desking thing started.   It exists to provide a benefit for the employer, pure and simple - it saves a huge amount of money on office space.   Bugger the employee. 

I can remember what offices were like before.  People personalised their desks:  they'd have pictures of their family, notes, postcards, even ornaments sometimes.  It made their desk a reflection of their personality and gave them a feeling they belonged.  With hot desking, all that is gone.

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Scot by birth, emigrated 1985 | Aussie husband applied UK spouse visa Jan 2015, granted March 2015, moved to UK May 2015 | Returned to Oz June 2016

"The stranger who comes home does not make himself at home but makes home itself strange." -- Rainer Maria Rilke

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5 minutes ago, Paul1Perth said:

Were you productive though or did you just have loads of spare time doing nothing? I can't see mainframe support being a full time job TBH. I've done the same sort of thing and I didn't much care for the working from home lark. I worked in Manchester for a company based in London. My missus got used to having me around and it got to the point of her saying can't you just paint this or do that when I wasn't that busy. Had the equipment down in the cellar luckily so used to disappear down there.

Much prefer working in an office where you can have a laugh and work with other people. I think office politics and bitchiness is worse where there are a lot of women. My wifes been in nursing all her life and she'd be the first to agree.

The mainframe system processed Credit Card applications and was in a constant and permanent state of change. Kept me fully employed doing all development, upgrades, enhancements, compliance changes etc for many years - didn't get any spare time until the bank (who's outsourced system it was) decided to bring it in-house in 2008. I think they had to employ a few people to do what I'd been doing alone, so I was extremely productive. 

I think it needs a particular type of person to be happy to work alone for extended periods. I loved it. Didn't miss a single thing about working in an office.

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11 minutes ago, Marisawright said:

You are absolutely right.  I was a facilities manager when the whole hot desking thing started.   It exists to provide a benefit for the employer, pure and simple - it saves a huge amount of money on office space.   Bugger the employee. 

I can remember what offices were like before.  People personalised their desks:  they'd have pictures of their family, notes, postcards, even ornaments sometimes.  It made their desk a reflection of their personality and gave them a feeling they belonged.  With hot desking, all that is gone.

Completely agree. Hot desking is awful. The bank I eventually worked for tried it but it didn't work. As you say, people like to 'move in' and make their desk their home. Can't do that when you're hot-desking.

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