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Sunset

Two years old

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2 hours ago, Toots said:

On a couple of occasions I assisted my son (a vet) when he did voluntary work de-sexing dogs in quite remote aboriginal communities.  The place was overrun with skinny, uncared for dogs and I hate to say it but the children weren't much better off.  There is no excuse for that.  Obese, drunken adults rolling around in the street whilst the children run wild with dirty matted hair, snotty noses and just looking neglected.  Very sad.

I've seen it so many times in Pilbara and Kimberely towns. The kids looking after the kids. Kids that looked no more than 8 or 9 years old pushing prams about when they should be at school while the parents are nowhere to be seen. No doubt pissed up somewhere. It's a terrible problem. They need to sort their own shit out rather than living life with a massive chip on their shoulders blaming the white man for all their woes.

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The problem lies with  the Child protection Agency having it's hands tied in legislation that says that a priority in placing a child in need of protection must be that it is placed within it's own cultural group. Peter Beatty attempted to legislate against this and he said something akin to, "Damn  cultural sensitivities, the kids safety comes first" What became of it I don't know because I opted out of fostering partially because of CPA rules at that time.

I had 3 siblings placed with me one morning because one of them had been "caned" across the back by the (Islander) grandmother and the school had reported the child's injuries. By evening, they were returned to the parent's because the Family court wouldn't issue a care order because the grandmother had administered,, "culturally acceptable punishment in absence of the parents" I found out later that another one of the siblings had been hospitalised due to "culturally acceptable punishment"

"tippy toeing" around cultural issues is one of the main factors IMHO for abuse in indigenous communities............abuse committed, in the main, by family members. Take one indigenous child into care and the priority is to place it with family members..............Errrrrrrrrrrrm??? Doesn't most abuse arrive from family members? So we place a child in a family where the extended family has a history of abuse!!!:sad: The abused family members go on to abuse ad finitum where there is little or no education re what is acceptable and what isn't and cultural sensitivities (accusations of racism) often prevent the subject being broached at an early educational level. Petrol sniffing, other substance abuse etc is also a factor.............there's a whole range of issues that need to be addressed on a "humanity" level, without hindrance from cultural/ethnic sensitivities

 

 

Certainly on a human and education level, all around. But not as an opportunity to say ‘we know best; we are right’. Clearly a lot of barriers and blockers need to come down. Everyone needs to go beyond the ill thought out policies of the past ‘white only/stolen generation’ etc acknowledge them for what they were at the time (misguided) and move on to safeguard the children. My only doubt is that the system (anywhere, not just in Aus) can be brutalising rife and open to abuse. It all needs a rethink.

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Nothing to do with funding


Institutionalised careerism then.

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IMG_5944.JPG.f06f76ef71f3b6c13fac1dbff7923663.JPG



It’s called institutionalised careerism - to hard, so ignore it so my career doesn’t nose dive. There is nothing PC about child abuse, and it happened across Tory and Labour counties. Not sure what a British problem it has to do with aboriginal child abuse in Australia though

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I've seen it so many times in Pilbara and Kimberely towns. The kids looking after the kids. Kids that looked no more than 8 or 9 years old pushing prams about when they should be at school while the parents are nowhere to be seen. No doubt pissed up somewhere. It's a terrible problem. They need to sort their own shit out rather than living life with a massive chip on their shoulders blaming the white man for all their woes.



Somehow I don’t think it’s that simple or cut and dry as that. Even if aboriginal people claim it is. There is clearly a longstanding issue of self respect and identity that needs acknowledging and addressing first. Somewhere the wires got severely crossed....

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15 minutes ago, ssiri said:

 

 


Somehow I don’t think it’s that simple or cut and dry as that. Even if aboriginal people claim it is. There is clearly a longstanding issue of self respect and identity that needs acknowledging and addressing first. Somewhere the wires got severely crossed....

 

 

I don't think self respect and trying to find ones identity as anything to do with child rape ?

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Somehow I don’t think it’s that simple or cut and dry as that. Even if aboriginal people claim it is. There is clearly a longstanding issue of self respect and identity that needs acknowledging and addressing first. Somewhere the wires got severely crossed....

 

I should add that this is a broader question in reference to absent and incapable parenting and blame culture (both sides). How would succumbing to alcoholism and addiction on a scale as large as an entire ethnic population (and then the negative effects there-in) be possible - if not down to a root cause of lacking respect for ones-self? Why so?

 

There is a vicious cycle that needs to be broken, and self righteousness and indignation from all sides, isn’t going to give the answers...

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