Jump to content

You're currently viewing the forum as a Guest
register-now-button_orig.png
and join in with discussions   
ask migration questions
message other members

..and much much more!

maidensarah

Is it normal that I keep changing my mind?!

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, Gbye grey sky said:

I doubt many base their decision on that show - or even get the idea to emigrate from watching it.  We used to watch it and, indeed, have met and become friendly with a family here who were on the show.  But, like most others, the seed was well and truly planted.

As to being the most ridiculous show you have yet to see I would contend that is a pretty high bar.

I think you might be surprised, I would be inclined to think it could definitely set some on the route to emigrate, it gives a mostly unrealistic view of life in Australia and let's face it that is what some want to see. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, ramot said:

We know someone who was on Escape to the Country, like you she was treated so well for the week. She decided not to move, as was on her own and realised because of the show the move wasn't right for her. We watch the show, enjoy the scenery, and enjoy criticising the houses.

We used to like seeing the houses we couldn't afford lol. Like you I enjoy the scenery from different areas of the country. 


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, bristolman said:

@ali, are you saying calNgary based their decision to move on that show ? Oh wait they couldn't have if they were on the very first show so your comment isn't really relevant ;)

Well having been brought over to visit - they got a good deal 

  • Like 1

I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, ali said:

Well having been brought over to visit - it may have helped their decision making

Yes but I was referring to people who made the decision based on watching the show, that obviously wasn't an option if in the very first show ;)


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, bristolman said:

Yes but I was referring to people who made the decision based on watching the show, that obviously wasn't an option if in the very first show ;)

Oh I see ... does it really matter if people did base their decision on the show? Doesn't really effect you or I at the end of the day.

  • Like 1

I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ali said:

Oh I see ... does it really matter if people did base their decision on the show? Doesn't really effect you or I at the end of the day.

No, it doesn't matter in the slightest but then I suppose we wouldn't comment on anything. It's not like I'm the only one to pick up on this show of course. 


Loving life in Gods Country. Woohoo, look at me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/19/2018 at 19:56, maidensarah said:

We are thinking about submitting an EOI however I keep changing my mind, mainly because I have small children who I worry about uprooting. 

I’ve been to Australia before for a year (12 years ago now), I travelled a bit, worked 7 months of the 12 and stayed for a few month in both Sydney and Brisbane. I wouldn’t have come home if my visa hadnt have ran out, but I was only 21 so it’s easy to have an adventure. 

My husband’s never been but I’ve always talked about it with him and we’ve recently been speaking to a recommended Migration agent and we are just deciding whether to do the Skills Assessment for my husband and submit the EOI.

My main concern is my children and that they’re settled in school. They are 6 (7 next month) and 4 (5 in May). They go to a nice school, have nice friends and teachers. It is such a scary thought to think that I’d be taking them away from that and into an unknown school to start again. I know children are adaptable but they’d still be different. Neither of them are particularly sporty and I hear about schools being very sporty. They like being outside and playing games but my oldest doesn’t like competitive things, it’s just not his personality. He’s more into the academic side of things. 

I realise that we don’t even have a visa granted (yet) however I have to think about my main concern before submitting the EOI.

I’m interested to hear from other parents that have moved. How did it work out (or not work out) for your children? 

Thanks 

I think it's completely normal to change your mind a lot in the early stages you haven't even completed an EOI yet, even at the later stages of the process most people have doubts.

We made the move with 3 kids in that age range trust me they will be the least of the stress for you,kids that age are very adaptable, i'd say get the ball rolling sooner rather than later it is easier the younger they are, my 3 are doing really well and the out of school activities available to them is far greater than in the UK, my eldest has just started high school on a GAT stream which would not have been available to her in the UK. When we first visited the kids primary school to enquire about enrollment the principal gave us a guided tour visiting each of the year groups our kids would be going into, that would have never have happened in the UK! Sport isn't rammed down there throats they do more here in school such as every morning as soon as the bell goes they go on to the school oval for some form of exercise either a couple of laps or some races. Apart from being a great swimmer my eldest isn't sporty at all I wouldn't worry about that at all.

We had decent jobs and that was always a concern leaving them, however we are both in similar jobs now just better paid.

You mention holidays we were the same an all inclusive to the med once a year costing a fortune and the odd weekend trip to Europe for the wife and I when the grandparents had the kids. Because of the location we chose we no longer need beach holidays we live it everyday, we love camping so get away doing that as often as we can, we have our first trip booked outside Australia for latter in the year 12 days in Japan visiting 3 different cities, we would never have been able to do a trip like that from the UK.

Just up to you and hubby to decide if it's right for you, we were the same but believe we made the correct choice it hasn't been plane sailing by any means but so glad we made the right decision(for us)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Sandgroper said:

I think it's completely normal to change your mind a lot in the early stages you haven't even completed an EOI yet, even at the later stages of the process most people have doubts.

We made the move with 3 kids in that age range trust me they will be the least of the stress for you,kids that age are very adaptable, i'd say get the ball rolling sooner rather than later it is easier the younger they are, my 3 are doing really well and the out of school activities available to them is far greater than in the UK, my eldest has just started high school on a GAT stream which would not have been available to her in the UK. When we first visited the kids primary school to enquire about enrollment the principal gave us a guided tour visiting each of the year groups our kids would be going into, that would have never have happened in the UK! Sport isn't rammed down there throats they do more here in school such as every morning as soon as the bell goes they go on to the school oval for some form of exercise either a couple of laps or some races. Apart from being a great swimmer my eldest isn't sporty at all I wouldn't worry about that at all.

We had decent jobs and that was always a concern leaving them, however we are both in similar jobs now just better paid.

You mention holidays we were the same an all inclusive to the med once a year costing a fortune and the odd weekend trip to Europe for the wife and I when the grandparents had the kids. Because of the location we chose we no longer need beach holidays we live it everyday, we love camping so get away doing that as often as we can, we have our first trip booked outside Australia for latter in the year 12 days in Japan visiting 3 different cities, we would never have been able to do a trip like that from the UK.

Just up to you and hubby to decide if it's right for you, we were the same but believe we made the correct choice it hasn't been plane sailing by any means but so glad we made the right decision(for us)

Thanks. I suppose I should elaborate a bit more on the school worries. My oldest (son) is very good academically. My youngest (daughter), who’s 4 (5 in May) and in Reception year, has been developmentally delayed since birth for unknown reasons. She was late reaching all milestones such as crawling at 15m, walked at 21m, had a moderate speech delay and was only really saying 2 words sentences at age 3. Over the last 1 year in particular, her speech has improved massively and I would say she’s almost caught up in that area, however sometimes she needs extra visual information or smaller steps due to a slower auditory memory/processing. However she is making excellent progress, she’s reading first books and is writing, she’s just not quite at the same level as most other children. She doesn’t need 1:1 a lot in school, she doesn’t need it as her behaviour is outstanding and she’s good at following routines, just sometimes need a bit of pre-teaching. Her school is excellent and supportive and she’s used to it and I would feel guilty changing that for the unknown. Mainly because of her sensory processing difficulties. I’m not worried about the friendship side for her as she still prefers to play alongside and do her own thing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, maidensarah said:

Thanks. I suppose I should elaborate a bit more on the school worries. My oldest (son) is very good academically. My youngest (daughter), who’s 4 (5 in May) and in Reception year, has been developmentally delayed since birth for unknown reasons. She was late reaching all milestones such as crawling at 15m, walked at 21m, had a moderate speech delay and was only really saying 2 words sentences at age 3. Over the last 1 year in particular, her speech has improved massively and I would say she’s almost caught up in that area, however sometimes she needs extra visual information or smaller steps due to a slower auditory memory/processing. However she is making excellent progress, she’s reading first books and is writing, she’s just not quite at the same level as most other children. She doesn’t need 1:1 a lot in school, she doesn’t need it as her behaviour is outstanding and she’s good at following routines, just sometimes need a bit of pre-teaching. Her school is excellent and supportive and she’s used to it and I would feel guilty changing that for the unknown. Mainly because of her sensory processing difficulties. I’m not worried about the friendship side for her as she still prefers to play alongside and do her own thing. 

Migrating with a child with disabilities can be a tad tricky. If you haven’t yet applied for your visa then going through an agent who specialises in medical conditions will be important (George Lombard and Peter Bollard are the two usually mentioned in this regard).

Theres a catch 22 situation for kids with disabilities - if they get a visa they are unlikely to get educational support and if they need support in education they’re unlikely to get a visa. 

It would be a wise move to get her a full psychoeducational assessment as that could be requested following the medical as I’m guessing she is statemented. Cognitive assessment, receptive and expressive language, adaptive behaviour, current skill levels and with, sensory processing issues, probably a paediatric assessment as well. 

In general, Australia doesn’t do kids with special needs as well as U.K. from all reports. Getting specific support requires quite significant deficits and if the child doesn’t have an impairment which is assessed as significant then they’re pretty much on their own and it’s in the lap of the Gods how they are dealt with in class. Nice little girls often slip through the cracks.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Quoll said:

Migrating with a child with disabilities can be a tad tricky. If you haven’t yet applied for your visa then going through an agent who specialises in medical conditions will be important (George Lombard and Peter Bollard are the two usually mentioned in this regard).

Theres a catch 22 situation for kids with disabilities - if they get a visa they are unlikely to get educational support and if they need support in education they’re unlikely to get a visa. 

It would be a wise move to get her a full psychoeducational assessment as that could be requested following the medical as I’m guessing she is statemented. Cognitive assessment, receptive and expressive language, adaptive behaviour, current skill levels and with, sensory processing issues, probably a paediatric assessment as well. 

In general, Australia doesn’t do kids with special needs as well as U.K. from all reports. Getting specific support requires quite significant deficits and if the child doesn’t have an impairment which is assessed as significant then they’re pretty much on their own and it’s in the lap of the Gods how they are dealt with in class. Nice little girls often slip through the cracks.

This was sadly the case with our eldest, who was diagnosed with Asperger's at the age of six.  She got no help, aside from what we paid for.  School really offered her very little support, and as she is a polite and quiet girl she pretty much went unnoticed, until she developed anxiety problems (due to being bullied in part) at which point it was easier for the school to phone and have me fetch her home, than encourage her to use the coping strategies that her psychologist had taught her.  Basically she fell into the 'Too Hard' basket, and as she wasn't disruptive it didn't really matter.  Her paperwork didn't even get passed on when starting a new year.  Her year 5 teacher called me in to ask why she was doing certain things in class and had no idea about her diagnosis.  I asked if she knew that DD had been diagnosed with autism, and she was like 'Yes, that makes sense now'.  To be fair, she was the best teacher she had though, once she knew.

Her school here in the UK has been the complete opposite.  Within a few weeks of her starting school I had had meetings with the school's SEN teacher, had met with the head of the SEN team at the high school she will be going to in August to discuss her transition to high school and see how they can best support her, and she had been referred by school to an OT.  She has since seen the OT for an assessment at the hospital, and they have arranged for an OT to attend school and help her with some things.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Quoll said:

Migrating with a child with disabilities can be a tad tricky. If you haven’t yet applied for your visa then going through an agent who specialises in medical conditions will be important (George Lombard and Peter Bollard are the two usually mentioned in this regard).

Theres a catch 22 situation for kids with disabilities - if they get a visa they are unlikely to get educational support and if they need support in education they’re unlikely to get a visa. 

It would be a wise move to get her a full psychoeducational assessment as that could be requested following the medical as I’m guessing she is statemented. Cognitive assessment, receptive and expressive language, adaptive behaviour, current skill levels and with, sensory processing issues, probably a paediatric assessment as well. 

In general, Australia doesn’t do kids with special needs as well as U.K. from all reports. Getting specific support requires quite significant deficits and if the child doesn’t have an impairment which is assessed as significant then they’re pretty much on their own and it’s in the lap of the Gods how they are dealt with in class. Nice little girls often slip through the cracks.

No she’s not statemented, doesn’t have a disability and has recently been discharged by her paediatrician so I don’t think getting a visa for her would be a problem. She’s just had some development delays 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LKC said:

This was sadly the case with our eldest, who was diagnosed with Asperger's at the age of six.  She got no help, aside from what we paid for.  School really offered her very little support, and as she is a polite and quiet girl she pretty much went unnoticed, until she developed anxiety problems (due to being bullied in part) at which point it was easier for the school to phone and have me fetch her home, than encourage her to use the coping strategies that her psychologist had taught her.  Basically she fell into the 'Too Hard' basket, and as she wasn't disruptive it didn't really matter.  Her paperwork didn't even get passed on when starting a new year.  Her year 5 teacher called me in to ask why she was doing certain things in class and had no idea about her diagnosis.  I asked if she knew that DD had been diagnosed with autism, and she was like 'Yes, that makes sense now'.  To be fair, she was the best teacher she had though, once she knew.

Her school here in the UK has been the complete opposite.  Within a few weeks of her starting school I had had meetings with the school's SEN teacher, had met with the head of the SEN team at the high school she will be going to in August to discuss her transition to high school and see how they can best support her, and she had been referred by school to an OT.  She has since seen the OT for an assessment at the hospital, and they have arranged for an OT to attend school and help her with some things.

Yes this would be my worry that something like this would happen. However as she’s so young it’s hard to know how she’ll be in the future as she’s made so much progress I’m hopeful that in a while the gap won’t be very wide. She’s only a year or so delayed, I’m just hoping the gap closes rather than gets bigger. She’s also ‘summer born’ and apparently summer born children don’t catch up until they’re about 13 anyway. She would have started school  later in Aus too so she would be a couple of terms ahead at least 

Edited by maidensarah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×