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simmo

The (all new) Brexit Thread

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Just now, ssiri said:

 

 


You better go back to basic maths -

first lesson, how to work with ranges then, accurately estimate proportion ranges.

 

 

So the answers is errrr no you don’t , ok good to get that cleared up 

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Has anybody thought about how long those big salaries can last for, sounds like a giant bubble, a bit like Dutch tulips in the 1700's which popped disastrously. 



In Aus terms, they are actually a downgrade/stagnating from whatever they were a 5-10 years ago. We will have to see, 30 years of growth in this economy- will it continue?

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Hmmmmm shame we have to pay to swim in the sea over here and pay to go camping in Derbyshire 🤣 and as for better food, that is funny really funny, fresh food is far better in the UK than dustbowl Oz as we have a far greater vegetable growing climate, fresh food in Oz is shipped over 1000s of miles from other countries as well. Fish is far better in the UK as is  meats, and being close to Europe we get all their fantastic produce. Nahhhh sunshine the fresh food in Oz was limp and tasteless compared, thats why the UK has the  greatest chefs in the world working here as they can get great produce from the UK and Europe.



You do talk a load of tosh, more often than not. Aus is a country with temperate and tropical climates and great seafood and local produce. So every type of produce imaginable. The customs regs ensure this is preserved.

Britain is good too. They are just different. The only fruit I miss not having from the UK, are Driscoll Jubilee strawberries and clementines. As for other products, clotted cream and brandy butter - but it’s possible to get UK creamery products from the David Jones food hall (or make your own).

Everything else I had previously I can get here (or have made).
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Cars are far more expensive in Oz including second hand even when wages are taken into consideration and thats a fact



Its all relative. My car cost $37,000 dollars down from $43,000. I am about to pay off my loan on it next month - in a total of 1.5 years.

I’d never have managed that in the UK for the same car, (which would have been about £22,000), it’d take me 5 years to completely pay of the loan in the UK - fact (on an above average UK income)
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REALLY??I found it nowhere near as good as the restaurants in the UK for quality and freshness.
Why fantastic seafood restaurants in the UK PLUS SO MANY BRILLIANT SUSHI BARS.
Birmingham fish market, worth a visit..
 
meat-n-fish-market.jpg&key=4c0bc49635296050556a1e342e33ddbf3214da151ccddc77316429287b71e73e
 



That’s what my local supermarket counter looks like over here, too.....
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FFS, it's about BREXIT , can you apply some brain power to that rather than slagging countries off.
 Or is that the problem no one can be bothered, we all know how this is going to end up, 10 bloody years of arguing
 


Spot on. I’d go with arguing for the lifetime of a generation through....

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2 hours ago, Parley said:

Same as elections, people are only happy as long as their guy wins.

When Trump wins elections are terrible things.

No, this was nothing like an election. Everyday ordinary people are deeply invested in this, and it means something to them. This is important for a lot of people. Cummings taped the pressure cell, he opened Pandora's box. This isn't going away anytime soon. Especially if they screw the leavers as looks increasingly likely. It isnt outside of the realms of possibility to form some sort of British IRA. The IRA have killed for less passionate reasons. But I still don't think what has been done is a bad thing. But we can't just remain and not address the needs of the leavers. This has happened. It will need a solution.

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1 hour ago, Toots said:

Well we all know a lot of what PB spouts is a load of tosh but it keeps him happy.  It's a bit like us keeping an annoying toddler entertained.  He simply can't grasp how different one part of Australia is from another.  You would think somebody born in Africa would realise that Australia rather like Africa has huge differences in landscape and climate.  

An annoying toddler who insists the world is flat. Fact! Have to admit, I stopped reading his posts, and life is much more pleasant.

Edited by newjez
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2 hours ago, ssiri said:

 

 


In Aus terms, they are actually a downgrade/stagnating from whatever they were a 5-10 years ago. We will have to see, 30 years of growth in this economy- will it continue?

 

 

When the global correction comes this year, Australian wages may prove a bit of a problem. The easiest way to deal with them is inflation, but that goes against the reserve banks guidelines. Regardless, I think a large devaluation of the aud will be necessary in 2019. Just my personal opinion.

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Looking like A50 is to be extended. What an absolute shower this government are.

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https://www.birminghampost.co.uk/news/local-news/how-ryton-jobs-moved-slovakia-3984757

Quote

The European Commission stalled £187 million of extra investment in Peugeot's Ryton plant while conducting its longest ever inquiry into state aid.

At the same time it used cash supplied by British taxpayers to subsidise the building of the Trnava plant in Slovakia, UK Independence Party transport spokesman and West Midlands MEP Mike Nattrass claimed yesterday.

Mr Nattrass said that Peugeot had submitted a request for state aid in December 2002, which the British government had referred to the European Commission. In what the DTI described as the 'longest case to win approval', a decision was not forthcoming until early 2005, by which time Slovakia was on the brink of accession to the European Union.

The Commission has approved £73 million of state subsidy for the Trnava plant.

Mr Nattrass continued: "Effectively British taxpayers have subsidised the export of their own jobs while the Commission dragged its feet over a decision which could have saved the livelihoods of thousands of my constituents.

"Peugeot was seeking state aid for Ryton in order to manufacture its replacement for the 206 range of vehicles. Had the Commission acted in a timely fashion and permitted the aid package requested, Peugeot would have invested £187 million in the West Midlands, and the future of the plant would be secure.

"Instead, the Commission decided that Trnava deserved the jobs more than Coventry, with the British government nothing more than a helpless bystander."

 

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31 minutes ago, simmo said:

 

 

Well suited couple I dare say.  😐

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Quote

Ben Houchen is the Mayor of the Tees Valley.

 

Life after Brexit means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. To the academic Brexiteer it could be the sunlit uplands of Free Trade and Free Speech, while to the arch-Remainer it means a nightmarish hellscape of disorder and scarcity. But to Britons who voted both leave and remain, life after Brexit should mean change. Real, visible, demonstrable change.

Whether we leave with no deal or the EU’s proposed deal, the onus is on the nation’s politicians to make life after we leave both visibly different and better than before. The threat to our democracy if we coast along, or worse, ignore the will of the people, is real.

Putting blue passports and other changes to international travel aside, making ‘Brexit’ feel like ‘Brexit’ means delivering the promises of the referendum. To Conservatives this means – or it certainly should mean – more freedom for individuals in the immediate term, while looking at how we create a better world for future generations, and do justice to those who came before us.

In short, those of us who believe in both Britain and Brexit need to protect the vision that was sold to voters when we won the referendum in 2016 – taking back control. We need to clearly demonstrate that politicians have listened, learned and will think and act differently to before. This can be achieved in a number of ways.

The UK has one of the lowest youth unemployment rates anywhere in Europe, but there are still hundreds of thousands of under 25s in need of the first step on the career ladder. This is one challenge where an end to unrestricted, unskilled migration may bring change.

On top of incentivising companies to hire young people from the UK – either through the tax system or otherwise – the scarcity caused by restrictions on unskilled labour may well force companies to become more innovative and thus productive.

While we can blame free movement for exacerbating our productivity problem, tackling it as a whole rather than relying purely on migration controls is one of the best ways we can grow our economy. That’s why I welcome the Government’s plan to introduce an immigration system based on people’s skills, not where they come from. A clear example of demonstrable change.

A new trade policy, with an eventual shift from the declining EU to relationships with faster growing economies must be a national priority. One of my flagship policies for the Tees Valley, which I hope the Government will adopt, is the creation of Free Trade Zones in the UK.

These would realise the benefits of increased manufacturing and international trade faster than might otherwise happen, through tariff and tax incentives. Sometimes called Free Ports, these zones could help to add billions to the economies of the UK’s most deprived regions, and create hundreds of thousands of jobs. Most fittingly, this policy would bring the benefits of Brexit to areas that voted heavily to leave. Another example of clear, demonstrable change.

Closer to home, there are some quick wins the Government can do the day after Brexit to demonstrate it is serious about change. Scrapping the hated Tampon Tax and VAT on energy bills would make the vast majority of Britons better off over night. It might also consider a ‘CANZUK’ migration deal with Australia, New Zealand and Canada, to strengthen ties with our old friends on the international stage while ensuring we have access to skills from around the globe.

The new Shared Prosperity Fund, which will replace EU funding into the regions, is a great opportunity to put areas like mine back in control of our own economic destinies – especially if the money is directed by elected Metro Mayors.

Some organisations, often big businesses and even bigger public bodies, want business as usual after Brexit, yet these organisations are desperately in need of change, and the ones that will benefit most from it.

Many of the challenges faced today are not entirely Brexit related, but more simply the reality of political, economic, and business life in the 21st century. While not a silver bullet, Brexit does however present both the opportunity and an incentive to tackle them now.

 

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8 hours ago, ali said:

I don't visit this thread unless there's been a report - seems the last  few pages have been about UK V Aus rather than leaving Europe.  Do try to keep on track, there are far too many pages to clean up the thread would end up being closed instead, which is a shame for the ones who are actually debating  the topic

The alternative might be that those deliberately taking the thread off topic might be issued infractions or even have their posts hidden until a moderator has time to censor fit for publication. 

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6 minutes ago, Toots said:

 

Well suited couple I dare say.  😐

I would!

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4 minutes ago, Rallyman said:

Thanks EU.

Quote

Cadbury moved factory to Poland 2011 with EU grant.
Ford Transit moved to Turkey 2013 with EU grant.
Jaguar Land Rover has recently agreed to build a new plant in Slovakia with EU grant, owned by Tata, the same company who have trashed our steel works and emptied the workers pension funds.
Peugeot closed its Ryton (was Rootes Group) plant and moved production to Slovakia with EU grant.
British Army's new Ajax fighting vehicles to be built in SPAIN using SWEDISH steel at the request of the EU to support jobs in Spain with EU grant, rather than Wales.
Dyson gone to Malaysia, with an EU loan.
Crown Closures, Bournemouth (Was METAL BOX), gone to Poland with EU grant, once employed 1,200.
M&S manufacturing gone to far east with EU loan.
Hornby models gone. In fact all toys and models now gone from UK along with the patents all with with EU grants.
Gillette gone to eastern Europe with EU grant.
Texas Instruments Greenock gone to Germany with EU grant.
Indesit at Bodelwyddan Wales gone with EU grant.
Sekisui Alveo said production at its Merthyr Tydfil Industrial Park foam plant will relocate production to Roermond in the Netherlands, with EU funding.
Hoover Merthyr factory moved out of UK to Czech Republic and the Far East by Italian company Candy with EU backing.
ICI integration into Holland’s AkzoNobel with EU bank loan and within days of the merger, several factories in the UK, were closed, eliminating 3,500 jobs.
Boots sold to Italians Stefano Pessina who have based their HQ in Switzerland to avoid tax to the tune of £80 million a year, using an EU loan for the purchase.
JDS Uniphase run by two Dutch men, brought up companies in the UK with £20 million in EU 'regeneration' grants, created a pollution nightmare and just closed it all down leaving 1,200 out of work and an environmental clean-up paid for by the UK tax-payer. 

 

Edited by simmo

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Shite! Both islands sell fish? Who would have guessed!

 

 

It’s a miracle!

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10 hours ago, newjez said:

Just watched brexit the uncivil war.

Quite good I thought.

We're screwed aren't we? We are never going to fix this. They broke the country.

Both sides. I used to think referendums were a good idea.

I'm not even sure governments are now.

We're screwed aren't we, whatever happens, we're screwed.

In your opinion of course and opinions are like *******, many experts are saying get through the scaremongering and the UK is far better leaving the sinking ship called the EU, the EU will not exist in a decade without major radical reform, so many EU countries want out, after the UK leaves there will be more countries leaving.


Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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3 hours ago, ssiri said:

 

 


That’s what my local supermarket counter looks like over here, too.....

 

 

That is one of about 50counters in one arcade selling fish from all over the world, its superb.

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Drinking rum before 11am does not make you an alcoholic, it makes you pirate..

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