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Peach

State of the NHS

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    I was shocked to see the experiences of two friends at NHS hospitals 50 miles apart this week.  What has happened since I left to make things this bad?  (Realise not everyone will share the same experiences).

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    I think sometimes it's about poor communication.  Before we left my son had a minor procedure - arrived at 7am as first on the list - he didn't go down until 4pm which then meant an overnight stay - not once did anyone say "look there's an emergency" or "there's a delay" etc.,  sometimes, just letting people know what the delay is, eases the frustrations.


    I just want PIO to be a happy place where people are nice to each other and unicorns poop rainbows

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    I think it really depends on the area.  When we lived in the UK I rarely went to a doc and was never in hospital.  Mum was never in hospital in her entire life even to have her babies (we were born at home).  In her 80s she was admitted to hospital after her stroke then a heart attack and died a week later.  The care in the hospital was wonderful.   My sister and I stayed in the hospital with her for 5 days -  there was a room with a bed nearby for overnight stays and I slept in a reclining chair in Mum's room.  Dad was never a healthy man - he had all sorts of health problems but always received very good care.  Perhaps things have changed over the years.  I could not fault the NHS when I lived in the UK.  It's sad to hear it's declining.

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    1 minute ago, Toots said:

    I think it really depends on the area.  When we lived in the UK I rarely went to a doc and was never in hospital.  Mum was never in hospital in her entire life even to have her babies (we were born at home).  In her 80s she was admitted to hospital after her stroke then a heart attack and died a week later.  The care in the hospital was wonderful.   My sister and I stayed in the hospital with her for 5 days -  there was a room with a bed nearby for overnight stays and I slept in a reclining chair in Mum's room.  Dad was never a healthy man - he had all sorts of health problems but always received very good care.  Perhaps things have changed over the years.  I could not fault the NHS when I lived in the UK.  It's sad to hear it's declining.

    Much what I have always heard about the NHS. Which leads one to believe that warnings over the past few decades certainly had a basis of truth. The agenda has been to run down NHS to such an extent in order to drown the howls of protest, with regards to the demise of present system and replaced by something far more sinister. (more along American lines) 

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    I always recieved pretty good care from the NHS, yes sometimes it took a fair few days to get in with my Dr, but hospital wise i can't really fault the treatment i recieved over the years. It does seem to have got worse this last 5 or 6 years not just from reports you read in the media about under staffing, no funds, overloading etc but also from what my family and friends have said about long waits, some hospitals closing units and having to now travel a fair distance to acess the services they need/ed.

    The maternity unit i had both my kids at is now closed down so people have to travel out of town to give birth, sad as it was a lovely unit with great staff and always very busy.

     

    Cal x


    If you don't go after what you want, you'll never have it. If you don't ask, the answer is always no. If you don't step forward, you're always in the same place...

    If you get a chance,take it, If it changes your life,let it. Nobody said it would be easy they just said it would be worth it...

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    Below is a report about hospitals and GPs in south west Scotland.  Things have changed a lot since I left.  Our family GP delivered me and my siblings at home and he was the only doctor we knew until we all left home.  After caring for the local community he retired when he was 70.

    The recruitment problem is most acute in general practice but affects most—but not all—specialties. A few years ago there were dozens of doctors competing for every place on the GP vocational training scheme, but now it’s only half filled. This problem is not unique to Dumfries and Galloway, but its more acute there than in most places. Plus trainees are now ranked with those at the top getting first choice on where they go. They tend to choose the big cities, meaning that Dumfries and Galloway tend to get those at the bottom, sometimes presenting serious problems to trainers. (My immediate reaction to this was that—as with the weaker teams in the draft in American football—places like Dumfries and Galloway should get the best not the weakest.)

    Some of the towns in the region, particularly in the West, which is the most remote, have been trying to recruit GPs for years without any serious applications. GPs have responded to the problem by doing extra sessions, recruiting advanced nurse practitioners, and merging practices, but it’s a downward spiral: remaining GPs are put under greater pressure, making them more likely to retire early or do something else. The government bringing down the size of the “pension pot” (the amount you can put into a pension without being penalised) means that GPs in their late 50s gain little by continuing to work.

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    Ah- so now I understand why my cousin retired at a relatively early age ( GP in Scotland) and relocated to York.

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    Here we go lol. We have had fantastic care from the NHS, can't complain at all. No system is perfect of course but it's certainly the best system we have needed to use. 


    Happy in UTOPIA.

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    I watched a TV series a while ago, that had been filmed in one of the London hospital trusts (I can't remember what it was called, but I'd seen it recommended on PIO).  What was surprising to me, something that I hadn't really thought of, was that oftentimes the surgery lists can be 'blocked' by shortages of beds further up the hospital.  For example, patient on a ward who can't go home although ready to because there is nobody to look after them there and no residential care, meaning that someone who is ready to go from a more high-dependency unit area to the ward can't, meaning that someone who needs transferring from intensive care can't move to the high dependency unit and so on.  So although it looks like nothing is going on with the surgery lists, it only takes a couple of blockages further up the hospital, or a couple of emergency admissions to scupper things.

    Both the NHS and social care are chronically underfunded unfortunately, which does have an effect on numbers of hospital beds and how they need to be used.  Having said that, I do love the NHS and have had mostly positive experiences with it.

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    Bed blocking is commonplace in the NHS @LKC. Been going in for years.

    My mother has an operation cancelled twice because of this and other shortages. She was booked in months ahead and had the op cancelled just before she was due to go in. 

    I love the NHS, one of the best things about the UK but it’s been destroyed over the years and the way forward the current Government is taking worries me greatly. The demise of the NHS is well underway.

    Yes individuals may have decent experiences but I only have to read my FB for my friends updates on the shocking level of care they receive in mental health care, botched ops, waits and delays and more. Also the old postcode lottery plays its part. If you can afford to live in a affluent area chances are you are going to have far less of a negative experience than those in the less well off or remote parts of the UK.

    Aged care and mental health are in trouble across the board. If you can afford private, good and lucky for you but if not :(  

     

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    5 hours ago, snifter said:

     

    I love the NHS, one of the best things about the UK but it’s been destroyed over the years and the way forward the current Government is taking worries me greatly. The demise of the NHS is well underway.

     

     

    As someone who lives in the UK I can't agree, it's not perfect but it's one of the best systems in the world, no doubt. The NHS is not being destroyed. 

    • Haha 1

    Happy in UTOPIA.

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    12 hours ago, bristolman said:

    As someone who lives in the UK I can't agree, it's not perfect but it's one of the best systems in the world, no doubt. The NHS is not being destroyed. 

    Says you. 

    Many people I know who are also living into the UK and working in the NHS, frontline staff, including a GP, consultant, nurses and midwives say otherwise. Also people who need to access NHS services on a regular basis (including my own family) have struggles and issues getting the care they need. I’m inclined to listen to their views over yours. 

     

     

     

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    Well when we were back for 3 months this year I have good news and bad news to report. 

    I had to go to A&E and had to attend a follow up visit plus GP visits and can't fault it. The hospital seemed really well staffed.

    The bad news!!! Grandson needed to see a GP on Good Friday, OK not an emergency but necessary, can't remember the tel. no. you ring, 101? took several hours before rang back. We rang every Dr in the area and  not one Dr was open even the walk in clinic was closed even though supposed to be open. This was in Bristol, We are talking a major city, later finally found one miles and miles away on the very far side of Bristol the only Dr available for the whole of Bristol, and yes before any one jumps down my throat, might be the same in lots of places in Oz? but we have 3 local surgeries near us on The Sunshine Coast that are open 7 days a week and you can't compare the size of population here to Bristol. Really surprised by the lack of GP cover.

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    I have been unlucky enough to need an NHS hospital three times in the last year. Three different hospitals in two different UK countries - Scotland and England. 

    The first, I went to my GP with a mole on my back that looked funny. Saw my gp on the morning who said it wasn't looking bad, but better to be safe than sorry. I was at the hospital the same day for initial tests!! Within two weeks, I was in surgery. The results came back positive, but the consultant is confident they have removed it all. Oh, and this is something I had gone to my gp in Oz about. So a very lucky escape. 

    The second was a work accident earlier this year. A steel tool weighing 80kg fell on my hand and it looked pretty nasty.  Went to A&E in Gateshead. 

    Within two hours, I had been examined, x-rayed, given an anti inflammatory injection issued pain killers and sent home - it wasn't bust. 

    Two weeks ago, on the Monday, I woke up not feeling great but set off for work. I am on a project in Lichfield at the moment, so a long drive and on a Monday set off at 2am. As time went on I felt worse and by the time I got to Gretna I decided to turn around and head home. Got home and went back to bed. Woke and not only felt bad but had chest pains. Decided, been a middle aged guy to go to A&E - there has been a campaign recently telling, particularly middle aged people to not ignore chest pain and go to hospital / call an ambulance. I was seen by triage immediately, scanned and x-rayed within an hour, had 3 ECG's and consultant was happy I wasn't having a heart attack. Two lots of blood samples sent. Then sent to cardiology where more tests done. All together I was in and out and on my way home in 4 hours. Turns out to be a nasty chest infection which is causing muscle spasms. 

    I can't think of a health system in the world that would have treated me better or faster. 

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    45 minutes ago, VERYSTORMY said:

    I have been unlucky enough to need an NHS hospital three times in the last year. Three different hospitals in two different UK countries - Scotland and England. 

    The first, I went to my GP with a mole on my back that looked funny. Saw my gp on the morning who said it wasn't looking bad, but better to be safe than sorry. I was at the hospital the same day for initial tests!! Within two weeks, I was in surgery. The results came back positive, but the consultant is confident they have removed it all. Oh, and this is something I had gone to my gp in Oz about. So a very lucky escape. 

    The second was a work accident earlier this year. A steel tool weighing 80kg fell on my hand and it looked pretty nasty.  Went to A&E in Gateshead. 

    Within two hours, I had been examined, x-rayed, given an anti inflammatory injection issued pain killers and sent home - it wasn't bust. 

    Two weeks ago, on the Monday, I woke up not feeling great but set off for work. I am on a project in Lichfield at the moment, so a long drive and on a Monday set off at 2am. As time went on I felt worse and by the time I got to Gretna I decided to turn around and head home. Got home and went back to bed. Woke and not only felt bad but had chest pains. Decided, been a middle aged guy to go to A&E - there has been a campaign recently telling, particularly middle aged people to not ignore chest pain and go to hospital / call an ambulance. I was seen by triage immediately, scanned and x-rayed within an hour, had 3 ECG's and consultant was happy I wasn't having a heart attack. Two lots of blood samples sent. Then sent to cardiology where more tests done. All together I was in and out and on my way home in 4 hours. Turns out to be a nasty chest infection which is causing muscle spasms. 

    I can't think of a health system in the world that would have treated me better or faster. 

    I promise I have no intention of an Oz against UK, but have to counter your post with an equally good one.

    Yesterday Friday, I had to call an ambulance for my husband. Ambulance here within max 10 mins. 3 medics checked him ecg etc. Off to hospital, straight into trauma? unit,  obviously ecg plus goodness knows what else as I have no medical knowledge. Not a heart attack but for lack of a better description heart not right pulse very very high bp very low? Monitored for hours till stable, stayed in over night monitored constantly, staff fantastic.

    On top of all this, don't laugh, I only recently had a heart procedure so my heart went into overdrive, so I had to be checked over thoroughly as well, ecg etc!!! Mine was definitely caused by.stress and calmed down but they didn't take any chances and was told to come straight back if in any pain.

    So an equally good experience, a brand new hospital, state of the art equipment, can't fault the care given, just the same as my treatment when in UK this year. 

    Husband home today, has to have further checks and then a similar procedure to me. You couldn't make it up, especially as neither of us thought we had a problem!! 

    Edited by ramot

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    There will be good and bad stories from  both countries.  

    Hope you and your husband are feeling a lot better today Ramot.  I have a dicky heart (inherited from my Dad) and can't complain about any treatment/procedures I've received here.  The local hospital can't treat me so I go to Launceston to see the cardiologist.  

     

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    7 minutes ago, Toots said:

    There will be good and bad stories from  both countries.  

    Hope you and your husband are feeling a lot better today Ramot.  I have a dicky heart (inherited from my Dad) and can't complain about any treatment/procedures I've received here.  The local hospital can't treat me so I go to Launceston to see the cardiologist.  

     

    Thank you, certainly less stressed and both our son and daughter have come to sort us out!!! Like you have been so well looked after, my Dr's surgery is really well equipped and I am under strict instructions to come straight in not phone if worried, and will be seen instantly ecg etc. All been a bit scary.

    hope you are ok as well. 

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    1 minute ago, ramot said:

    Thank you, certainly less stressed and both our son and daughter have come to sort us out!!! Like you have been so well looked after, my Dr's surgery is really well equipped and I am under strict instructions to come straight in not phone if worried, and will be seen instantly ecg etc. All been a bit scary.

    hope you are ok as well. 

    Thanks!  Yes, fit as a fiddle these days.  :)

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    1 hour ago, VERYSTORMY said:

    I have been unlucky enough to need an NHS hospital three times in the last year. Three different hospitals in two different UK countries - Scotland and England. 

    The first, I went to my GP with a mole on my back that looked funny. Saw my gp on the morning who said it wasn't looking bad, but better to be safe than sorry. I was at the hospital the same day for initial tests!! Within two weeks, I was in surgery. The results came back positive, but the consultant is confident they have removed it all. Oh, and this is something I had gone to my gp in Oz about. So a very lucky escape. 

    The second was a work accident earlier this year. A steel tool weighing 80kg fell on my hand and it looked pretty nasty.  Went to A&E in Gateshead. 

    Within two hours, I had been examined, x-rayed, given an anti inflammatory injection issued pain killers and sent home - it wasn't bust. 

    Two weeks ago, on the Monday, I woke up not feeling great but set off for work. I am on a project in Lichfield at the moment, so a long drive and on a Monday set off at 2am. As time went on I felt worse and by the time I got to Gretna I decided to turn around and head home. Got home and went back to bed. Woke and not only felt bad but had chest pains. Decided, been a middle aged guy to go to A&E - there has been a campaign recently telling, particularly middle aged people to not ignore chest pain and go to hospital / call an ambulance. I was seen by triage immediately, scanned and x-rayed within an hour, had 3 ECG's and consultant was happy I wasn't having a heart attack. Two lots of blood samples sent. Then sent to cardiology where more tests done. All together I was in and out and on my way home in 4 hours. Turns out to be a nasty chest infection which is causing muscle spasms. 

    I can't think of a health system in the world that would have treated me better or faster. 

    Good post. All we can do is comment on personal experiences. Ours have certainly been mixed in Australia going back to the 90s when I had an operation on my leg cancelled as I was being wheeled in, then after the operation some weeks later to stem the not insignificant bleeding they simply wrapped more and more bandage around my knee, the bandage was completely soaked through by the time I got home. When my eldest son broke his arm at a school when another boy pushed him off some steps, he was taken to hospital where he sat on a trolley for hours and it wasn't until I made a fuss that a doctor came to see him, bearing in mind he was about 6 years old. The doctor seemed most put out that I had bothered her. He then went on to sit around for hours more. When your children are involved it tends to colour your opinion. About a year after we arrived here by youngest broke his arm on a trampoline and the whole experience couldn't have been more different, night and day. Prompt treatment from friendly helpful staff.

    I agree with your last line 100%.


    Happy in UTOPIA.

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    I'm so happy to report that when my youngest broke her wrist at school this week we were able to park for free right outside A&E and were dealt with almost immediately. Including several x-rays, assessments and plaster casting in and out within a couple of hours. 

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    Oh I wish some posters would shut up!! There's good and bad in both countries!!!!!

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    Certainly not the case at any Brisbane Hospital, cost us a fortune to park. 

    Edited by bristolman

    Happy in UTOPIA.

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    3 minutes ago, ramot said:

    Oh I wish some posters would shut up!! There's good and bad in both countries!!!!!

    Indeed there is. 


    Happy in UTOPIA.

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