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    I'm sure this has been asked alot but I'm new here. 

    How much does it cost to emigrate roughly. This is our circumstances 

    Family of 2 adults and 6 children wanting to come out on a 189 or 190

    Agent who specialises in character issues

    One dog. (We could never leave without him. He will be 8 so still young) 

    Flights 

    A move cube (We don't have anything of great value so would start a fresh.

    Rental of a 4 bed house (We would love to go to western Australia and be no more then a 15 minute drive to the beach)

    Money in the bank to keep us comfortable intill we got on our feet. 

    We wouldn't move unless we had jobs to go to as I couldn't take that risk with a family to support. 

    I no there are lost of hidden smaller costs. I'd just like a rough idea of what to be aiming for 

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    Hi Kbald86

    Welcome to the forum

    It's many years ago since we emigrated, so I can't advise on a lot of the costs, hopefully some of our members can help.

    However, I'll start the ball rolling. 

    Flying in March (which tends to be the cheapest month) 2 adults and 6 children London to Perth would be in the region of £3,800 (although it depends on the age of your children). 

    There are many good agents who post on the forum who I wouldn't hesitate to recommend.

    @Richard Gregan http://www.overseas-emigration.co.uk/

    @wrussell   http://www.pinoyau.com/ 

    @Raul Senise http://www.ozimmigration.com

    @Alan Collett https://www.gmvisas.com/ 

     

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    Visa application charge $3600 for the primary applicant plus $1800 each for each secondary applicant 18 years or older plus $900 for each secondary applicant under 18 years 18 years. A few hundred up to a few thousand for the mandatory pre-migration skills assessement, depending on your skilled occupation plus medical, travel, supporting document, settlement costs, state nomination fees (if applicable) $3000 or so for the dog, agents fees? Budget at least $50 000.


    Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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    I pretty much concur with wrussell. We moved out here (with dog) for good 4.5 years ago (citizenship test on Monday coming) the whole thing roughly cost us between £65,000 to £70,000 but that’s including two trips out here prior to the big move.

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    26 minutes ago, Plentymech said:

    I pretty much concur with wrussell. We moved out here (with dog) for good 4.5 years ago (citizenship test on Monday coming) the whole thing roughly cost us between £65,000 to £70,000 but that’s including two trips out here prior to the big move.

    Quite some difference between $A50,000 and GBP 65,000 and 70,000 though.

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    Many of those costs are fixed and easy to find on the net.  The less obvious costs are school fees - even public schools charge a few hundred and expect you to buy equipment and books even for primary and uniforms can be expensive too.  Driving licenses, insurance, cars, rental deposits, setting up costs all add up.  It is not cheap.  You can save by buying stuff from gumtree etc but some things will be fixed.  

    If you have an idea of the area you are going to you can look at rentals and schools to get an idea.

     

    as for getting a job before you go, that isn’t easy, depending on your occupation of course, but most people find that employers prefer someone they can see in the flesh.  The majority of people move without of having jobs to go to, so you will need a few months living expenses to tide you over.

    If you get a PR visa you will be entitled to some child benefits, so worth checking those out too.

    There is a lot of research to do!

     

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    So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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    4 hours ago, Plentymech said:

    I pretty much concur with wrussell. We moved out here (with dog) for good 4.5 years ago (citizenship test on Monday coming) the whole thing roughly cost us between £65,000 to £70,000 but that’s including two trips out here prior to the big move.

    Actually I was going to estimate somewhat more than that with 6 kids and a pooch - you also have to take in those other things like buying and insuring a car or two and maybe 3-6 months out of work plus rental bonds and up front rents, house insurance, medical insurance, pet insurance, generic set up costs, etc. It seems like you haemorrhage money at the beginning but I guess £70k would be a starting point so if it actually costs you less then you’d have a small pot of savings for emergencies.

    If you come with a job on a temporary visa then the costs change as you are assured of the income but you have other costs like school fees which can be a bit steep with 6 kids, no benefits to fund child care, medical costs for things that are elective etc.

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    Just now, wrussell said:

    School fees in public (state) schools are voluntary.

     

    Not so with the stationery, school trips, uniform, lunches, snacks etc etc etc Even if you can avoid paying the so-called voluntary contributions, 6 kids at school will set you back a lot of $$

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    Stae and other shools offer a discount for quantity.

    School fees with extras such as subject levies, stationery, sports and other uniforms costs me about $3600 a year for 3 grandchildren (one has reached year 7) and all of whom I have 24/7. This does not count computers, cell phones, excursions, the daily school run, lost clothing,  lost tablets, their bloody dog (that eats like a horse) pocket money, overseas trips, Netflix, 1500 GB of mindnumbing downloads every month.


    Westly Russell Registered Migration Agent 0316072 www.pinoyau.com

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    6 hours ago, wrussell said:

    Stae and other shools offer a discount for quantity.

    School fees with extras such as subject levies, stationery, sports and other uniforms costs me about $3600 a year for 3 grandchildren (one has reached year 7) and all of whom I have 24/7. This does not count computers, cell phones, excursions, the daily school run, lost clothing,  lost tablets, their bloody dog (that eats like a horse) pocket money, overseas trips, Netflix, 1500 GB of mindnumbing downloads every month.

    Haha kids are ace at draining the bank arnt they. 

    If we ever did move out eldest 3 would be 16+ so only have 3 to put into school. At the moment It's just a pipe dream but I'm trying to get as much info as possible so we can decide if it's something we will aim for or if it's a dream we have to let go. We would need to save a substantial amount of money every month if we were to give it a shot 

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    1 hour ago, Kbald86 said:

    Haha kids are ace at draining the bank arnt they. 

    If we ever did move out eldest 3 would be 16+ so only have 3 to put into school. At the moment It's just a pipe dream but I'm trying to get as much info as possible so we can decide if it's something we will aim for or if it's a dream we have to let go. We would need to save a substantial amount of money every month if we were to give it a shot 

    You need to ensure that they are still dependent on you then, or they cannot come on your visa - once they are over 18 dependency can be hard to prove. 

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    If they are around 16 then you will need to be careful as that is a transition age in Australia and they really need to do the final two years of school in Aus or they need to stay in UK and finish A levels. If they are beyond that and not in full time education they run the risk of not being dependent on you as has been said. And if they are still studying and plan to continue that in Aus, you will be looking at even bigger fees for Uni

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    As others have said, you need to research the dependancy aspect asap so you are fully informed of what it entails for your kids and their gaining or not gaining a visa. If they are not dependant (ie have gone out and gotten a full time job or perhaps moved out for 6 months) you could be stuffed trying to include them on your visa application. So be aware and keep up to date in case they move the goalposts. Pleading unawareness to the rules or changes made to them when it comes to visa applications is not an excuse that will fly. Do some reading and consult a decent migration agent for a consult perhaps. Many offer a free one to look over your case. Any of those on here, including the migration agent who has posted in this thread would be a good starting point. 

    As for costs, much will depend on you, your ability or willingness to budget and perhaps live frugally for a while. Don't count on you both securing work from overseas either. Its rare this happens and many have to make the move without jobs and job seek once in Aus. Also keep in mind if you were going to hang out to secure employment before you moved, you would perhaps need to all make a validation trip to validate your visas and then return to the UK till work is found. You will all only have a limited time in which to make first entry into Aus, be that moving or validating and leaving again. Everyone will need to validate, not just the parents. Factor that into your plans and cost accordingly. 

    Much will depend on the area you move to also housing as to cost. Some areas are cheaper than others. This could mean you are perhaps in a not so in demand area to live and its perhaps reflected in the standard of schools etc in the area. In the main cities, they can sprawl out for miles and miles. So there are options to choose from but you could be a long way from the actual 'city' area and what it offers. 

    TBH I'd not like to say how much. Looking at your list you can price up some of the things easily enough yourself.

    Movecube will give a price over the phone. We got our quote based on location either end and it was a pretty standard price (others who shipped also came in around the same from different areas going to different cities). Small, medium or large cube, give them a call :)

    Dog - Contact pet shippers (  and they will explain how you measure your dog. Its not based on weight but size and so bigger breed dogs will cost more. Shippers make crates to fit the dog so there is room for them to stand and turn round. Depending on the size of your dog, cost will vary. Plus there is the rabies blood work etc. It could well be a fair few thousand £ you are looking at for the dog. @BobPetairUK can probably help with your questions and price :)

    Flights - Without knowing where and to, its hard to say. Plus there is one way, return etc and if you are prepared to fly a longer or more awkward route with longer connections or some such to save some ££'s. I'd go check out places like Skyscanner and where you are prepared to fly from and in to and see what comes up. I tend to fly direct and like Singapore Airlines but they are not the cheapest. Emirates often are out of the main carriers but I loathe that route and the Dubai hub for flight change. Then there are airlines like China Southern who come in cheaper usually but it means flying via China and perhaps a long layover or delays once in China. Japan can be a good route cost wise but it could mean doing a night at an airport hotel as it could be a 18 hour layover (airline used to cover this cost, not sure now). 

    Rental - Check out rentals on https://www.realestate.com.au/rent TBH with 6 kids and you both wanting to work, I'm not sure WA or Perth is the best bet. Do your homework on the employment situation there and also on the market for rentals (ie if there are loads but cost still high and job market poor). Perhaps post and ask in our WA area of the forum for some feedback on things there. It could well be for your budget and where you secure work, 15 mins from the beach isn't realistic. 

    Cars cost over here. Even an older well driven one will set you back. Check here to give you an idea. https://www.carsales.com.au/

    I'd say save as much as you can to bring over with you. If you are planning to sell a house before moving and it will give you a lump sum, be prepared to watch that disappear with 8 of you making the move. Some people manage on a lesser amount, others spend 50K before they know it. Much will depend on how you are used to living and are prepared to live to start off (and possibly in the longer term also) when you make the move. It isn't going to be magically better or see you living 'the dream' from the off. The dream can be a bloody hard slog for a few years. For some it falls apart and their dream is ruined and they leave Aus. With so many of you to consider, keep in mind some may love life in Aus, others may not. Be prepared for the fallout of some are unhappy. Taking a while to find a job can be the biggest issue. Can really kill off the positivity people had about their move and see them struggle. 

     

     

     

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    3 hours ago, snifter said:

    As others have said, you need to research the dependancy aspect asap so you are fully informed of what it entails for your kids and their gaining or not gaining a visa. If they are not dependant (ie have gone out and gotten a full time job or perhaps moved out for 6 months) you could be stuffed trying to include them on your visa application. So be aware and keep up to date in case they move the goalposts. Pleading unawareness to the rules or changes made to them when it comes to visa applications is not an excuse that will fly. Do some reading and consult a decent migration agent for a consult perhaps. Many offer a free one to look over your case. Any of those on here, including the migration agent who has posted in this thread would be a good starting point. 

    As for costs, much will depend on you, your ability or willingness to budget and perhaps live frugally for a while. Don't count on you both securing work from overseas either. Its rare this happens and many have to make the move without jobs and job seek once in Aus. Also keep in mind if you were going to hang out to secure employment before you moved, you would perhaps need to all make a validation trip to validate your visas and then return to the UK till work is found. You will all only have a limited time in which to make first entry into Aus, be that moving or validating and leaving again. Everyone will need to validate, not just the parents. Factor that into your plans and cost accordingly. 

    Much will depend on the area you move to also housing as to cost. Some areas are cheaper than others. This could mean you are perhaps in a not so in demand area to live and its perhaps reflected in the standard of schools etc in the area. In the main cities, they can sprawl out for miles and miles. So there are options to choose from but you could be a long way from the actual 'city' area and what it offers. 

    TBH I'd not like to say how much. Looking at your list you can price up some of the things easily enough yourself.

    Movecube will give a price over the phone. We got our quote based on location either end and it was a pretty standard price (others who shipped also came in around the same from different areas going to different cities). Small, medium or large cube, give them a call :)

    Dog - Contact pet shippers (  and they will explain how you measure your dog. Its not based on weight but size and so bigger breed dogs will cost more. Shippers make crates to fit the dog so there is room for them to stand and turn round. Depending on the size of your dog, cost will vary. Plus there is the rabies blood work etc. It could well be a fair few thousand £ you are looking at for the dog. @BobPetairUK can probably help with your questions and price :)

    Flights - Without knowing where and to, its hard to say. Plus there is one way, return etc and if you are prepared to fly a longer or more awkward route with longer connections or some such to save some ££'s. I'd go check out places like Skyscanner and where you are prepared to fly from and in to and see what comes up. I tend to fly direct and like Singapore Airlines but they are not the cheapest. Emirates often are out of the main carriers but I loathe that route and the Dubai hub for flight change. Then there are airlines like China Southern who come in cheaper usually but it means flying via China and perhaps a long layover or delays once in China. Japan can be a good route cost wise but it could mean doing a night at an airport hotel as it could be a 18 hour layover (airline used to cover this cost, not sure now). 

    Rental - Check out rentals on https://www.realestate.com.au/rent TBH with 6 kids and you both wanting to work, I'm not sure WA or Perth is the best bet. Do your homework on the employment situation there and also on the market for rentals (ie if there are loads but cost still high and job market poor). Perhaps post and ask in our WA area of the forum for some feedback on things there. It could well be for your budget and where you secure work, 15 mins from the beach isn't realistic. 

    Cars cost over here. Even an older well driven one will set you back. Check here to give you an idea. https://www.carsales.com.au/

    I'd say save as much as you can to bring over with you. If you are planning to sell a house before moving and it will give you a lump sum, be prepared to watch that disappear with 8 of you making the move. Some people manage on a lesser amount, others spend 50K before they know it. Much will depend on how you are used to living and are prepared to live to start off (and possibly in the longer term also) when you make the move. It isn't going to be magically better or see you living 'the dream' from the off. The dream can be a bloody hard slog for a few years. For some it falls apart and their dream is ruined and they leave Aus. With so many of you to consider, keep in mind some may love life in Aus, others may not. Be prepared for the fallout of some are unhappy. Taking a while to find a job can be the biggest issue. Can really kill off the positivity people had about their move and see them struggle. 

     

     

     

    Thankyou for taking the time to write all of that down, it's very helpful and some useful links. It's such a huge decision and with there being so many of us it's a gamble knowing how everyone would adapt. We have 3 that are old and 3 younger and my worst nightmare would be getting there and one of the older ones leaving and going back to the UK. 

    I understand that 5 years is a long time but to make this happen we would be saving every penny in that time to afford it. We are very good at cutting back and saving if we have a goal but our income is not high so having a rough idea of the costs involved will help us to decide if it's an achievable goal in the time frame we have. We feel we need to leave before the eldest is 18 to stand a chance of going and him coming with us. I could never leave any of them behind so if it's going to divide us we just couldn't do it. 

    I have alot of research still to do. 

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    Apply as soon as you can if you are able.  Don’t wait 5 years to apply.  Rules can and do change so you may find you no longer qualify.  Also age is a factor for the main applicant as well as the kids.

    once you get the visa you will have 5 years in which to make the move.  You do need to enter Australia to validate the visa within 12 months of your medical/police check dates though.

    what is the age and occupation of the main applicant?


    So many wineries ......so little time :yes:

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    Depends on your spending power and the type of person you are ofc.

     

    I would say AUD50k sounds much fairer than GBP70k. I know people who have done it for a lot cheaper...

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    5 hours ago, Kbald86 said:

    Thankyou for taking the time to write all of that down, it's very helpful and some useful links. It's such a huge decision and with there being so many of us it's a gamble knowing how everyone would adapt. We have 3 that are old and 3 younger and my worst nightmare would be getting there and one of the older ones leaving and going back to the UK. 

    I understand that 5 years is a long time but to make this happen we would be saving every penny in that time to afford it. We are very good at cutting back and saving if we have a goal but our income is not high so having a rough idea of the costs involved will help us to decide if it's an achievable goal in the time frame we have. We feel we need to leave before the eldest is 18 to stand a chance of going and him coming with us. I could never leave any of them behind so if it's going to divide us we just couldn't do it. 

    I have alot of research still to do. 

    Kids grow up and leave. Its a fact of life. You could stay in the UK and have some of them go live overseas. I'd get them their visas and after that its up to them if they make use of it and move or move and stay or go. Hopefully the older ones will want to come out and give it a try but for many that age its a hard sell and/or they may find it hard to settle. Friends and so on are a big thing at that age and if they don't have school or uni to go in to to make new ones, it could be hard for them. 

    If you are planning all this for in 5 years, I'd say stop planning. As has been said, visa lists can and do change. I'd save for sure if you want to be able to make the move but until the time comes to actually applying for the visa, there isn't much else you can do. Or else apply for the visas now and know you have them, validate and have the 5 years or so in which to actually make the move. 

     

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    4 hours ago, rammygirl said:

    Apply as soon as you can if you are able.  Don’t wait 5 years to apply.  Rules can and do change so you may find you no longer qualify.  Also age is a factor for the main applicant as well as the kids.

    once you get the visa you will have 5 years in which to make the move.  You do need to enter Australia to validate the visa within 12 months of your medical/police check dates though.

    what is the age and occupation of the main applicant?

    Neither of us currently have a skill on the list. This is why it's a 5 year plan. We are going to the college open evening next week to sign up. I'm doing a degree in early childhood studies which I will complete June 2022 and my husband was hoping to do metal fabrication and welding and get work here to get the 3 years experience, but that being said he needs to speak with his cardiologist as to if that's a safe occupation as he has a pace maker. He isn't to worried what he gets a skill in aslong as he can get well paid work in the uk doing it. 

    The way we have looked at it is that we have spent 13 years growing and raising our family and the time has come to work on the chapter that comes once they have flown the nest. Be it in the UK or Australia. If we aim for Australia and the skill is removed or we change our minds, we will of still got ourselves forward in life in the UK and have careers to focus on for the years between the kids flying the nest and us reaching retirement. It may seem like a far fetched plan to some but we like to set our goals high. :)

     

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    59 minutes ago, Kbald86 said:

    Neither of us currently have a skill on the list. This is why it's a 5 year plan. We are going to the college open evening next week to sign up. I'm doing a degree in early childhood studies which I will complete June 2022 and my husband was hoping to do metal fabrication and welding and get work here to get the 3 years experience, but that being said he needs to speak with his cardiologist as to if that's a safe occupation as he has a pace maker. He isn't to worried what he gets a skill in aslong as he can get well paid work in the uk doing it. 

    The way we have looked at it is that we have spent 13 years growing and raising our family and the time has come to work on the chapter that comes once they have flown the nest. Be it in the UK or Australia. If we aim for Australia and the skill is removed or we change our minds, we will of still got ourselves forward in life in the UK and have careers to focus on for the years between the kids flying the nest and us reaching retirement. It may seem like a far fetched plan to some but we like to set our goals high. :)

     

    So, if I am understanding your position.

    You presumably currently both work but have 6 school age children.  You plan to carry on with your existing jobs but learn new skills in your spare time with a view to moving straight into well-paid jobs in the new line of work you have chosen and your husband has a serious heart condition.

    You are hoping to save £50-70,000 over the next 5 years during which time you plan to apply for a visa on the basis that those skills will still be required in Australia and then secure well paid jobs in Australia with a view to moving in 2022 at which time all 6 of your kids will still be under 18, dependent on you for financial support, and willing at that time to emigrate with you at which time you will come over without possessions.  Your dog who will then be 8 will be coming with you too.

    You do not mention your ages but that may be an issue for you both as might your husbands health.


    Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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    52 minutes ago, Gbye grey sky said:

    So, if I am understanding your position.

    You presumably currently both work but have 6 school age children.  You plan to carry on with your existing jobs but learn new skills in your spare time with a view to moving straight into well-paid jobs in the new line of work you have chosen and your husband has a serious heart condition.

    You are hoping to save £50-70,000 over the next 5 years during which time you plan to apply for a visa on the basis that those skills will still be required in Australia and then secure well paid jobs in Australia with a view to moving in 2022 at which time all 6 of your kids will still be under 18, dependent on you for financial support, and willing at that time to emigrate with you at which time you will come over without possessions.  Your dog who will then be 8 will be coming with you too.

    You do not mention your ages but that may be an issue for you both as might your husbands health.

    No he does not have a serious heart condition he has a valve to small from being born very prem. 

    We live a comfortable life financially and work but not within jobs on the skills list. My college course is 2 days a week when my children are in school and nursery and my husband's course will be evenings. 

    I wouldn't even be on here asking questions if saving that type of money wasn't possible. 

    And no I do not expect to walk into a high paid job, I struggle to see where I've implied this in this post, all I said is of prefer to have work to come out to so I wasn't risking months with no wages coming in and children to provide for. 

    Yes my older 3 will be under 18. Between 15 and 18.

    We are both 31 and yes we would bring our dog. I feel like you may be patronising me here. 

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    13 minutes ago, Kbald86 said:

    No he does not have a serious heart condition he has a valve to small from being born very prem. 

    We live a comfortable life financially and work but not within jobs on the skills list. My college course is 2 days a week when my children are in school and nursery and my husband's course will be evenings. 

    I wouldn't even be on here asking questions if saving that type of money wasn't possible. 

    And no I do not expect to walk into a high paid job, I struggle to see where I've implied this in this post, all I said is of prefer to have work to come out to so I wasn't risking months with no wages coming in and children to provide for. 

    Yes my older 3 will be under 18. Between 15 and 18.

    We are both 31 and yes we would bring our dog. I feel like you may be patronising me here. 

    Definitely not patronising you.

    Best of luck with your plans as you need a fair number of ducks to line up in a row and clearly a lot of effort as well over the next 5 years to achieve your goals.


    Timeline: 309/100 Sent 7/8/13, Money Taken 9/8/13, CO appointed 3/9/13. Med 3/12/13. Police check 4/12/13. VISA GRANTED 8/4/14, Subclass100. Recce August 2014. Arrived 30 July 2015.

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        Hi guys just a quick note..had our 190 visa granted on 11th August we will be arriving in Sydney on 5th November staying with my sister in law in Ashfield inner west, initially as a base for our travels and untill we decide if were gonna settle or not. I'm a gas fitter and plumber in the UK and my fiancee is an optical dispenser (works in an opticians)...would anyone know the like wages combined we may achieve in Sydney with relation to renting etc....we are renting out our 3 bed semi in Liverpool and have a decent amount of money to get us started...any help appreciated
         
         
      • By The Pom Queen
        Food     Basic lunchtime menu (including a drink) in the business district AU$16   Combo meal in fast food restaurant (Big Mac Meal or similar) AU$11   500 gr (1 lb.) of boneless chicken breast AU$5.80   1 liter (1 qt.) of whole fat milk AU$1.24   12 eggs, large AU$5.82   1 kg (2 lb.) of tomatoes AU$4.43   500 gr (16 oz.) of local cheese AU$8   1 kg (2 lb.) of apples AU$4.45   1 kg (2 lb.) of potatoes AU$3.31   0.5 l (16 oz) domestic beer in the supermarket AU$5.41   1 bottle of red table wine, good quality AU$18   2 liters of Coca-Cola AU$3.28   Bread for 2 people for 1 day AU$2.23 Housing     Monthly rent for 85 m2 (900 Sqft) furnished accommodation in EXPENSIVE area AU$2,925   Monthly rent for 85 m2 (900 Sqft) furnished accommodation in NORMAL area AU$2,180   Utilities 1 month (heating, electricity, gas ...) for 2 people in 85m2 flat AU$307   Monthly rent for a 45 m2 (480 Sqft) furnished studio in EXPENSIVE area AU$2,257   Monthly rent for a 45 m2 (480 Sqft) furnished studio in NORMAL area AU$1,921   Utilities 1 month (heating, electricity, gas ...) for 1 person in 45 m2 (480 Sqft) studio AU$620   Internet 8 Mbps (1 month) AU$46   40” flat screen TV AU$665   Microwave 800/900 Watt (Bosch, Panasonic, LG, Sharp, or equivalent brands) AU$226   Laundry detergent (3 l. ~ 100 oz.) AU$14   Hourly rate for cleaning help AU$27 Clothes     1 pair of jeans (Levis 501 or similar) AU$103   1 summer dress in a High Street Store (Zara, H&M or similar retailers) AU$68   1 pair of sport shoes (Nike, Adidas, or equivalent brands) AU$135   1 pair of men’s leather business shoes AU$151 Transportation     Volkswagen Golf 1.4 TSI 150 CV (or equivalent), with no extras, new AU$27,280   1 liter (1/4 gallon) of gas AU$1.25   Monthly ticket public transport AU$126   Taxi trip on a business day, basic tariff, 8 km. (5 miles) AU$21 Personal Care     Cold medicine for 6 days (Tylenol, Frenadol, Coldrex, or equivalent brands) AU$10   1 box of antibiotics (12 doses) AU$21   Short visit to private Doctor (15 minutes) AU$68   1 box of 32 tampons (Tampax, OB, ...) AU$7   Deodorant, roll-on (50ml ~ 1.5 oz.) AU$5.01   Hair shampoo 2-in-1 (400 ml ~ 12 oz.) AU$6   4 rolls of toilet paper AU$2.95   Tube of toothpaste AU$3.93   Standard men's haircut in expat area of the city AU$29 Entertainment     Basic dinner out for two in neighborhood pub AU$60   2 tickets to the movies AU$36   2 tickets to the theater (best available seats) AU$185   Dinner for two at an Italian restaurant in the expat area including appetisers, main course, wine and dessert AU$114   1 cocktail drink in downtown club AU$18   Cappuccino in expat area of the city AU$5.02   1 beer in neighbourhood pub (500ml or 1pt.)  AU$10   iPad Air 2, 64GB AU$751   1 min. of prepaid mobile tariff (no discounts or plans) AU$0.35   1 month of gym membership in business district AU$69   1 package of Marlboro cigarettes AU$26
         
      • By The Pom Queen
        Food + 16% Food in Perth (Australia) is 16% more expensive than in London (United Kingdom)   Basic lunchtime menu (including a drink) in the business district AU$16 (£10) £10 - 4%   Combo meal in fast food restaurant (Big Mac Meal or similar) AU$11 (£6) £5.96 + 9%   500 gr (1 lb.) of boneless chicken breast AU$5.80 (£3.50) £4.09 - 14%   1 liter (1 qt.) of whole fat milk AU$1.24 (£0.75) £0.95 - 21%   12 eggs, large AU$5.82 (£3.52) £3.05 + 15%   1 kg (2 lb.) of tomatoes AU$4.43 (£2.68) £2.46 + 9%   500 gr (16 oz.) of local cheese AU$8 (£5.12) £4.99 + 3%   1 kg (2 lb.) of apples AU$4.45 (£2.69) £1.96 + 37%   1 kg (2 lb.) of potatoes AU$3.31 (£2.00) £0.83 + 141%   0.5 l (16 oz) domestic beer in the supermarket AU$5.41 (£3.27) £1.62 + 101%   1 bottle of red table wine, good quality AU$18 (£11) £9 + 17%   2 liters of Coca-Cola AU$3.28 (£1.98) £1.78 + 11%   Bread for 2 people for 1 day AU$2.23 (£1.35) £0.97 + 39% Housing - 5% Housing in Perth (Australia) is 5% cheaper than in London (United Kingdom)   Monthly rent for 85 m2 (900 Sqft) furnished accommodation in EXPENSIVE area AU$2,925(£1,768) £2,272 - 22%   Monthly rent for 85 m2 (900 Sqft) furnished accommodation in NORMAL area AU$2,180(£1,318) £1,845 - 29%   Utilities 1 month (heating, electricity, gas ...) for 2 people in 85m2 flat AU$307 (£186) £207 - 10%   Monthly rent for a 45 m2 (480 Sqft) furnished studio in EXPENSIVE area AU$2,257(£1,364) £1,608 - 15%   Monthly rent for a 45 m2 (480 Sqft) furnished studio in NORMAL area AU$1,921(£1,161) £1,079 + 8%   Utilities 1 month (heating, electricity, gas ...) for 1 person in 45 m2 (480 Sqft) studio AU$620 (£374) £160 + 134%   Internet 8 Mbps (1 month) AU$46 (£28) £22 + 27%   40” flat screen TV AU$665 (£402) £305 + 32%   Microwave 800/900 Watt (Bosch, Panasonic, LG, Sharp, or equivalent brands) AU$226 (£137) £80 + 72%   Laundry detergent (3 l. ~ 100 oz.) AU$14 (£8) £7 + 26%   Hourly rate for cleaning help AU$27 (£17) £12 + 43% Clothes + 12% Clothes in Perth (Australia) is 12% more expensive than in London (United Kingdom)   1 pair of jeans (Levis 501 or similar) AU$103 (£63) £73 - 14%   1 summer dress in a High Street Store (Zara, H&M or similar retailers) AU$68 (£41) £31 + 32%   1 pair of sport shoes (Nike, Adidas, or equivalent brands) AU$135 (£82) £76 + 8%   1 pair of men’s leather business shoes AU$151 (£91) £96 - 5% Transportation - 39% Transportation in Perth (Australia) is 39% cheaper than in London (United Kingdom)   Volkswagen Golf 1.4 TSI 150 CV (or equivalent), with no extras, new AU$27,280(£16,486) £18,069 - 9%   1 liter (1/4 gallon) of gas AU$1.25 (£0.76) £1.19 - 36%   Monthly ticket public transport AU$126 (£76) £137 - 44%   Taxi trip on a business day, basic tariff, 8 km. (5 miles) AU$21 (£13) £19 - 33% Personal Care + 0% Personal Care in Perth (Australia) is 0% more expensive than in London (United Kingdom)   Cold medicine for 6 days (Tylenol, Frenadol, Coldrex, or equivalent brands) AU$10 (£5.97) £3.49 + 71%   1 box of antibiotics (12 doses) AU$21 (£13) £8 + 57%   Short visit to private Doctor (15 minutes) AU$68 (£41) £69 - 40%   1 box of 32 tampons (Tampax, OB, ...) AU$7 (£4.33) £2.68 + 61%   Deodorant, roll-on (50ml ~ 1.5 oz.) AU$5.01 (£3.03) £1.91 + 59%   Hair shampoo 2-in-1 (400 ml ~ 12 oz.) AU$6 (£3.90) £3.55 + 10%   4 rolls of toilet paper AU$2.95 (£1.79) £1.79 - 1%   Tube of toothpaste AU$3.93 (£2.37) £1.89 + 25%   Standard men's haircut in expat area of the city AU$29 (£18) £18 - 3% Entertainment + 5% Entertainment in Perth (Australia) is 5% more expensive than in London (United Kingdom)   Basic dinner out for two in neighborhood pub AU$60 (£37) £35 + 4%   2 tickets to the movies AU$36 (£22) £24 - 9%   2 tickets to the theater (best available seats) AU$185 (£112) £144 - 23%   Dinner for two at an Italian restaurant in the expat area including appetisers, main course, wine and dessert AU$114 (£69) £63 + 10%   1 cocktail drink in downtown club AU$18 (£11) £11 + 4%   Cappuccino in expat area of the city AU$5.02 (£3.03) £3.20 - 5%   1 beer in neighbourhood pub (500ml or 1pt.)  AU$10 (£5.99) £4.98 + 20%   iPad Air 2, 64GB AU$751 (£454) £442 + 3%   1 min. of prepaid mobile tariff (no discounts or plans) AU$0.35 (£0.21) £0.15 + 38%   1 month of gym membership in business district AU$69 (£42) £65 - 35%   1 package of Marlboro cigarettes AU$26 (£16) £10 + 66% TOTAL - 11%  
        These prices were last updated 12 minutes ago. Exchange rate: 0.604 GBP / AUD
      • By The Pom Queen
        Following on from the other thread I thought we could have one on where to find the cheapest beer each week.
        IT is unusual to see the words Perth and cheap beer in the same sentence. Drinkers have long endured high prices for their pints, middies and schooners. 
        But some pubs, driven by the state of the economy, are looking to turn the tide by offering cheaper options for drinkers to wet their whistle.
        On Stirling Highway in Nedlands, the Captain Stirling Hotel is one venue turning to cheaper beer to woo customers.
        Late last year, managers noticed the weekends did not have the right atmosphere, and crowds were thin.
        They decided to offer $6 pints on Fridays and Saturdays in an attempt to bring the vibe back.
        Six months later, manager Sasha Nikulinsky says it is working.
        “Basically, the Fridays and Saturdays weren’t performing. We didn’t have the clientele,” he said.
        “A previous manager instigated the special to expand our weekend trade and bring the local pub vibe back again.
        “We’ve got a decent vibe here now throughout the night. We’ve got a good atmosphere during the late afternoon and the early evening because of the deal.”
        Down the road at the Albion Hotel in Cottesloe, $5 schooners are drawing in crowds from all walks of life.
        Assistant manager Lorna McMullan said the pub had received good feedback.
        “It’s just about good value. It’s definitely added a bit of interest and we’re seeing newer faces around the pub,” she said.
        On a stormy Thursday night dozens of drinkers sat at the bar taking advantage of the special, which includes old favourites such as Swan Draught.
        Mates Harry Rich, 25, and Toby Goyder-Ewan, 24, said they grabbed a drink at the Albion a few times a week, and enjoy the schooners.
        “Given we’re students, a $5 drink is super attractive and there’s a great atmosphere here, plus we’re friends with most of the staff,” Mr Goyder-Ewan said.
        The pair go so far as to say it is one of the best drink deals in Perth.
        “As far as being convenient and located locally for us, and not having to pay a membership, like you do at bowls clubs, this is one of the best deals,” Mr Rich said.
        In Leederville, Oxford Hotel owner Peter Hayes said he picked Thursday night to offer $8 pints for every beer on tap because it was a good community night.
        “It’s about offering a good-value deal for our regular customers,” he said.
        “It’s good to offer something back, especially when times are difficult. People aren’t rolling in money these days.
        “We’ve certainly seen an increase in numbers, but it’s not huge. And it’s good if pubs can offer specials, where they can afford to do it, of course.
        “Problem is while things are tough the cost of the product continues to increase twice a year.”
        The High Wycombe Tavern offers its beer of the month for $5.90, and the Elephant and Wheelbarrow in Northbridge has $7 pints of Swan Lager from Sunday to Thursday.
        At the Dianella Tavern, an $8 pint of Carlton Dry comes with an entry to a weekly draw for a carton of beer, plus all entries go into the running for a motorised esky.
        “Last year we had customer growth of 50 per cent, but this year we’ve shrunk by 15 to 20 per cent, so we decided to put on the promotion,” manager Kerry Blackburn said.
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