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Iain1

First time seeking to travel WHV in australia

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    Hi 

     

    Im from the UK  looking if anyone planning  to go australia on working holiday visa by late 2018 or early 2019. 

     

     I am in two mind to go traveling solo plan it all myself or be with travel buddy, or go with them travel group for first couple of weeks, i am hoping  start regional work first so i could be eligible for 2nd WHV and give me more time to  travel spend time there. 

    Have couple of question too.

    1. where would be best season to go to find regional work, as i seen on many forums  from nov to jan busy period, where everyone looking for work also most expensive time for getting flights which i am trying not to go for.

     

    2. Where would you recommend i should start off first, i was thinking to do western australia to do work.

     

    3. Banking as i will be transferring money before go out there.  as well back and forwards to uk  while in australia which bank would anyone recommend so i not paying fortune on transaction fee on exchange rate. i have seen HSBC which i could open in Australia not pay any fees while transferring money back and forwards to uk will need to double check this.

     

    Any tip or recommendation will be greatly appreciated.

     

    Thanks

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    Moneycorp

    Moneycorp

    I use Transferwise to move money from the UK to Australia between my UK and Aussie bank accounts. It might be worth applying for a "card reader" for added security - I have one for each of my English bank accounts - like a mini calculator in which you insert your bank card then follow prompts on the computer to access your bank account.

    I don't know which bank to recommend you choose in Australia. We have a similar "big four" to the UK - ANZ, Commonwealth, Westpac, NAB, and now no more charges when you use each other's ATMs. I used the Commonwealth ATM opposite my flat on Melbourne Cup day to do a free withdrawal - I'm with ANZ. There are other banks just as good as the ones i mentioned.

    It's probably nice to travel with a friend but if you are coming on your own, well, once you are in a hostel you will soon make some friends. There still seems to be plenty of bar work in the pubs where I live in Surry Hills (Sydney) but you need to get your RSA (Responsible Service of Alcohol) which I understand is not too difficult. I know young French guys and German girls who have just walked into pubs and asked if there are jobs.

    I came to OZ in November, 1978 starting off in WA before moving to SA, briefly, and finally to Sydney where I finally got a job at the end of January, 1979. Some companies do go into holiday mode around December/January although there might be a corresponding lift in hospitality work. 

    I am not familiar with obtaining farm work although some I think follows the seasons. You might get other work in regional areas to fulfil those visa obligations, e.g. in a roadhouse.

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    Hello there

    I suggest coming alone. You won't be alone for long, as you will easily meet up or pair up with other backpackers. It is easier to make friends if you are alone.

    In my opinion, the best banks are: ING and The Commonwealth Bank.

    https://transferwise.com/gb/blog/opening-a-bank-account-in-australia

    Do a Google search for : "Australian harvest trail" or "backpackers working in roadhouses" or "working at an outback farm or station".

    You can follow the harvests around Australia. You could also do Woofing which will give you some great experience and exposure to rural living. 

    Loads of websites with information.

    But are you sure you want to do regional work? It is bloody hard work, in hot conditions, often on snake infested farms, for very little pay. And some of those roadhouses and cattle stations are miles from anywhere and full of dubious rough-as-guts characters. Yes you will have some great stories to tell your grandkids, but not exactly a picnic to do.

    Hospitality work is a good job to get. Something like bar attendant and waiter. You will need a RSA (Responsible Service of Alcohol) Certificate and these are easy and cheap to get. http://www.rsasydney.nsw.edu.au/

    Many businesses shut for the "summer holiday" which is basically the whole of January. But on the other hand, because a lot of people are holidaying in January, that does mean lots of hospitality jobs will be available, especially in the cities.

    https://www.backpackerjobboard.com.au/

    I would do it in 2018. Why wait? Best thing I ever did was a WHV to Australian from the UK when I was 20. Honestly best year of my life. And loved the place so much; I then migrated here.

    I purposely arrived in Sydney in September. Weather was coolish, but it prepared me nicely for summer in Sydney. Had I arrived in January I would have had a shock. From snow leaving London to a heatwave in Sydney within a space of 24 hours, would have been too much of a shock I think.

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    On 12/9/2017 at 21:11, FeralBeryl said:

    But are you sure you want to do regional work? It is bloody hard work, in hot conditions, often on snake infested farms, for very little pay. And some of those roadhouses and cattle stations are miles from anywhere and full of dubious rough-as-guts characters. Yes you will have some great stories to tell your grandkids, but not exactly a picnic to do.

    Regional work is necessary if you want to get a second WHV so it's often a good idea to do it first and get it over with rather than struggling to find something when you are nearing the end of your first year.


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    186 ENS Temporary Residence Transition - Granted Dec 2013 :biggrin:

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